News – Food & Beverage https://foodmag.com.au Fri, 23 Feb 2018 03:13:48 +0000 en-AU hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.4.2 https://foodmag.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/prime-creative-media-50x50.png News – Food & Beverage https://foodmag.com.au 32 32 Woolworths first-half profit up 38pc https://foodmag.com.au/woolworths-first-half-profit-38pc/ Thu, 22 Feb 2018 23:37:16 +0000 https://foodmag.com.au/?p=66583 Woolworths’ first-half profit has risen by 38 per cent to $969m and the supermarket giant has also recorded a 3.8 per cent increase in sales.

The post Woolworths first-half profit up 38pc appeared first on Food & Beverage.

]]>
Woolworths’ first-half profit has risen by 38 per cent to $969m and the supermarket giant has also recorded a 3.8 per cent increase in sales.

The company also announced a dividend per share of 43c, up 26.5 per cent.

“At the end of FY17, we said that we were moving from turnaround to transformation. In the current half we have seen some early signs of this transformation with good progress on a number of strategic initiatives and pleasing sales growth from all of our businesses. We remain committed to our focus on building a customer and store-led culture and team with a highlight in the half being the continued improvement in customer, team and supplier advocacy scores across the Woolworths Group,” said Brad Banducci, Woolworths Group CEO.

“In Australian Food, despite beginning to cycle some more challenging prior year numbers, sales increased by 5.1% with a strong second quarter (comparables sales: +5.0%). EBIT increased by 11.1% due to strong sales and continued improvement in stock loss despite investment in key strategic initiatives such as digital, incremental team training and IT as well as higher depreciation costs.”

The post Woolworths first-half profit up 38pc appeared first on Food & Beverage.

]]>
Women in Industry Awards 2018 – nominations now open https://foodmag.com.au/women-industry-awards-2018-nominations-now-open/ Thu, 22 Feb 2018 22:43:35 +0000 https://foodmag.com.au/?p=66573 Nominations for annual Women in Industry Awards, the annual event celebrating women who are making a mark in the Australian industrial sector, are now open.

The post Women in Industry Awards 2018 – nominations now open appeared first on Food & Beverage.

]]>
Nominations for the Women in Industry Awards, the annual event celebrating women who are making a mark in the Australian industrial sector, are now open.

This opportunity only comes around once a year, so now is the time to consider those women who have achieved success through their leadership, innovation and commitment to their sector.

This is your opportunity to recognise the women who are driving change in your industry and – in doing so – breaking down barriers and creating new possibilities for the next generation.

These may be women you work with, women whose achievements are inspiring you from afar, or women who are providing you with invaluable guidance and support. We believe their dedication and exceptionalism should be celebrated.

Nominations are open in 10 categories and will close on 30 April 2018.

WHEN: 6:30pm, Thursday 14 June 2018
WHERE: Doltone House, Jones Bay Wharf, Sydney

To nominate, click here.

WIIA2017Edit- (76 of 612)

The post Women in Industry Awards 2018 – nominations now open appeared first on Food & Beverage.

]]>
Proposals to improve pork industry make good reading https://foodmag.com.au/proposals-improve-pork-industry-make-good-reading/ Wed, 21 Feb 2018 23:57:50 +0000 https://foodmag.com.au/?p=66556 An Australasian pork research organisation has received 40 submissions to its call for research proposals to enhance the competitiveness and sustainability of the Australasian industry.

The post Proposals to improve pork industry make good reading appeared first on Food & Beverage.

]]>
An Australasian pork research organisation has received 40 submissions to its call for research proposals to enhance the competitiveness and sustainability of the Australasian industry.

Novel means of monitoring and improving pig health and reproduction, alleviating summer infertility and enhancing genetic progress across the Australian pig herd, were just some of the subjects covered in quality research proposals submitted this week to Australasian Pork Research Institute Limited (APRIL).

APRIL, which replaces the Cooperative Research Centre for High Integrity Australian Pork (Pork CRC), is fully member based with an initial investment in 2018-2019 approaching $3 million and is actively seeking new science and creative new ideas.

Pork CRC CEO, Roger Campbell, said that at first reading the submissions looked promising, with some potential game changers, including from overseas scientists.

“APRIL is seeking innovative research proposals that can really drive positive change for Australia’s pork industry, which contributes $5 billion a year to Australia’s economy and employs 36,000 people,” Dr Campbell said.

APRIL’s strategic plan for research is about making the Australasian pork industry more resilient and sustainable by markedly reducing cost of production through enhanced productivity and differentiation in specific areas.

The target cost of production (COP) is $2.22/kg carcass weight. The current COP, with feed at $370/tonne, varies from $2.60 – $2.80/kg carcass weight.

APRIL’s three programs cover resilience, cost and return on assets.

Intending to commission research by the middle of 2018, basically one year before the close of Pork CRC operations, APRIL projects should ensure continuity of the current level of research and support opportunities for relevant research during the wind-down.

 

The post Proposals to improve pork industry make good reading appeared first on Food & Beverage.

]]>
South Melbourne Market wins environmental award https://foodmag.com.au/south-melbourne-market-wins-environmental-award/ Wed, 21 Feb 2018 22:32:59 +0000 https://foodmag.com.au/?p=66548 The market’s work to recycle tonnes of food, vegetable and other waste, and other sustainable practices is cutting business costs and greenhouses gas emissions.

The post South Melbourne Market wins environmental award appeared first on Food & Beverage.

]]>
The South Melbourne Market’s work to recycle tonnes of food, vegetable and other waste, and other sustainable practices is cutting business costs and greenhouses gas emissions.

The market, won the Institute of Public Affairs Australia’s Victorian Environmental Sustainability Award, sponsored by Sustainability Victoria in Melbourne on Tuesday night.

“As community expectations about environmental sustainability grows and waste disposal costs rise, it’s clear that the South Melbourne’s market is hitting the mark on both counts,” Sustainability Victoria CEO Stan Krpan said.

“The South Melbourne Market’s comprehensive program could be applied to other markets and shopping centres, not just in Melbourne, but around Australia,” Krpan said.

“The City of Port Phillip, market management and the businesses that operate there are doing a great job to reduce the amount of waste going to landfills, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and helping vulnerable people in the community.”

The market processed around 400 cubic metres of green waste in 2016/17 (equivalent to more than 22 garbage trucks) through a worm farm creating Market Magic, a mix of worm poo and mushroom compost which is sold at the market.

The market also has a fast-working Gaia recycling unit which turns 8.4 tonnes of food and other waste into compost, also sold at the market, every week. Over a year, the weight recycled is equivalent to 20 Melbourne trams.

Approximately 10,800 litres of oil was collected from the Market in 2016-17. Most is turned into biodiesel which is used in the vehicles which collect it.

The post South Melbourne Market wins environmental award appeared first on Food & Beverage.

]]>
Sugary soft drinks could increase cancer risk, no matter your weight https://foodmag.com.au/sugary-soft-drinks-increase-cancer-risk-no-matter-weight/ Wed, 21 Feb 2018 22:23:55 +0000 https://foodmag.com.au/?p=66545 Drinking sugary soft drinks could increase cancer risk, regardless of body size, reveals new research from Cancer Council Victoria and University of Melbourne.

The post Sugary soft drinks could increase cancer risk, no matter your weight appeared first on Food & Beverage.

]]>
Drinking sugary soft drinks could increase cancer risk, regardless of body size, reveals new research from Cancer Council Victoria and University of Melbourne.

People who regularly drank sugary soft drinks were found to be more at-risk of several types of cancer than those who didn’t, according to the study, published in the Public Health Nutrition journal today.

“These particular cancers are commonly associated with obesity, however our research found this risk existed for all participants, no matter their size,” said Associate Professor Allison Hodge of Cancer Council Victoria’s Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division.

The findings are based on a research study of more than 35,000 Australians who developed 3283 cases of obesity-related cancers.

“We were surprised to find this increased cancer risk was not driven completely by obesity.

“Our study found that the more sugary soft drinks participants drank, the higher their risk of cancer. This was not the case with those who drank diet soft drinks, suggesting sugar is a key contributor,” said A/Prof Hodge.

“Even people who were not overweight had an increased cancer risk if they regularly drank sugary soft drinks.”

The caramel colouring (4-methylimidazole) used in cola drinks, and artificial sweeteners, did not seem to affect cancer risk, she said.

“Interestingly, though, we found those who regularly drank diet soft drinks were just as likely to be obese as those who regularly drank sugary soft drinks, which still carries health risks”.

Cancer Council Victoria CEO Todd Harper said these findings provide yet another reason for people to cut back their consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks.

“Sugary drinks, including soft drinks, are already known to be a cause of obesity, which greatly increases the risk of 13 types of cancer,” he said.

“And cancer is just one of many chronic health conditions associated with sugary drink consumption – including increased risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and tooth decay.”.

“We need more people to understand the connection and make the switch to water.”

The study looked at adult soft drink consumption, but the problem is likely even more significant in younger Australians, according to Obesity Policy Coalition Executive Manager Ms Jane Martin.

“Younger Australians are consuming significantly more sugary drinks than older people, they are widely available and often discounted” Ms Martin said.

“Big brands bombard kids with marketing for these unhealthy sugary drinks, including through sport, which can set kids up for a lifetime of health problems.”

“A 20% health levy on sugary drinks can help deter people from these cheap and very unhealthy drinks, and help recover some of the significant costs associated with obesity and the increasing burden this puts on our public health care system.”

Ms Martin also said people should still be cautious about drinking artificially-sweetened drinks, as these have also been associated with weight gain and obesity, which is in turn associated with cancer.

A/Prof Hodge said she would like to see these findings confirmed among other populations, and understand why – and the extent to which – sugar seems to increase cancer risk.

“This is one of the first studies to identify an association between sugary soft drinks and cancer risk, and so we hope this study will encourage more research in this area going forward,” she said.

The post Sugary soft drinks could increase cancer risk, no matter your weight appeared first on Food & Beverage.

]]>