News – Food & Beverage https://foodmag.com.au Fri, 19 Oct 2018 01:07:24 +0000 en-AU hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.4.2 https://foodmag.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/prime-creative-media-50x50.png News – Food & Beverage https://foodmag.com.au 32 32 Two new executives appointed at PepsiCo ANZ https://foodmag.com.au/pepsico-executives-appointed/ Fri, 19 Oct 2018 01:07:24 +0000 https://foodmag.com.au/?p=69867 PepsiCo ANZ has appointed two new executives to its leadership team that bring extensive knowledge of the food industry. Stepping into the role of senior sales director ANZ is Louise Baker, who was previously the sales director at Frucor Suntory. She was also customer director at Goodman Fielder and spent 14 years in sales, marketing and … Continue reading Two new executives appointed at PepsiCo ANZ

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PepsiCo ANZ has appointed two new executives to its leadership team that bring extensive knowledge of the food industry.

Stepping into the role of senior sales director ANZ is Louise Baker, who was previously the sales director at Frucor Suntory.

She was also customer director at Goodman Fielder and spent 14 years in sales, marketing and category positions at Procter and Gamble in the United Kingdom.

“As a reputable company with many iconic brands in its portfolio, PepsiCo ANZ appealed to both my interests in shopper marketing and drive to expand the footprint of an FMCG company within its local market,” said Baker.

READ: PepsiCO, partners with companies, including Nestlé Waters, to develop bio-based bottles

“Having built a career on customer experience and sales, the sales director role at PepsiCo ANZ seemed like a natural fit and next step for me and I look forward to steering the sales team in a direction that will meet consumer demand for the long-term,” she said.

Dulcie de Koning has been appointed to the role of commercial strategy director ANZ.

She was previously employed at Procter and Gamble for 20 years, working in both Australia and the United Kingdom.

De Koning’s experience spans retail channels and categories and has previously included beauty and grooming, homecare and electrical.

“I’ve worked with leading brands to deliver sustained business performance in sales, customer marketing and strategy positions and look forward to doing the same at PepsiCo ANZ,” said De Koning.

PepsiCo ANZ CEO, Danny Celoni said he looked forward to welcoming the additional two talented individuals to the team and their input on current projects.

“PepsiCo ANZ is a vibrant business and we are in a strong position to continue to drive category-leading innovation and growth,” said Celoni.

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Fruit flies targeted in new Australian trial https://foodmag.com.au/fruit-flies-australian-trial/ Thu, 18 Oct 2018 22:59:12 +0000 https://foodmag.com.au/?p=69863 A new trial is being launched to combat fruit flies in Australia. The new tech start-up program, RapidAIM, is a real-time monitoring system using technology to detect the presence and location of fruit flies. It has the support of the Australian government, with hopes it will potentially cut down the need for time-consuming manual monitoring. … Continue reading Fruit flies targeted in new Australian trial

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A new trial is being launched to combat fruit flies in Australia.

The new tech start-up program, RapidAIM, is a real-time monitoring system using technology to detect the presence and location of fruit flies.

It has the support of the Australian government, with hopes it will potentially cut down the need for time-consuming manual monitoring.

Minister for industry, science and technology Karen Andrews said RapidAIM features new technology developed by CSIRO researchers and is backed by the government’s National Innovation and Science Agenda (NISA).

READ: Australian biosecurity ‘stronger than ever’

“Fruit flies cost Australia’s horticulture sector around $300 million a year and can have a major impact on our fruit and vegetable growers,” said Andrews.

“RapidAIM’s innovations have the potential to transform the way we track and predict fruit fly movements, so our growers have the tools in future growing seasons to protect their crops more effectively.

“The coalition is investing approximately $2.4 billion in growing Australia’s research, science and technology capabilities, as announced in this year’s budget, and this type of technology can help our farmers.

“The successful launch of this new company demonstrates the true benefits of investing in Australia’s world-leading research and innovation, supporting small businesses to solve real Australian problems,” said Andrews.

Minister for Agriculture David Littleproud said the government also committed $1.35m to fund the trial of the automated smart traps as part of the RapidAIM system.

“The trial will compare the automated traps to the currently used manual traps in locations in SA, WA, NSW, Vic and Tasmania,” said Littleproud.

“The smart traps use lures to attract fruit flies. Females are lured in by food and males by chemicals they think will make them more attractive to female flies.

“Sensors will be able to detect when a fruit fly is in the trap by their characteristic movements and send an alert to a grower’s mobile phone,” he said.

“This innovative technology could provide farmers access to real-time data about the presence of fruit fly on their farms and across their regions so they can respond to an outbreak quicker,” said Littleproud.

Developed by Dr Nancy Schellhorn, Darren Moore and Laura Jones during their time at CSIRO, the technology was successfully trialled by some of Australia’s biggest fruit producers in Victoria last year.

The researchers have now founded the company to help take their invention to growers around Australia in future fruit growing seasons.

 

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Total Construction explains complexity of building a food processing plant https://foodmag.com.au/total-construction-food-plant/ Thu, 18 Oct 2018 22:23:27 +0000 https://foodmag.com.au/?p=69860 Hidden away on the top storey of an old brick building at the heart of North Strathfield, Sydney are the offices of Total Construction. If a company ever wanted to show off its wares, then its own offices are a great advertisement. Old cracked bricks surround the open-plan working space with modern furnishings, polished floors … Continue reading Total Construction explains complexity of building a food processing plant

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Hidden away on the top storey of an old brick building at the heart of North Strathfield, Sydney are the offices of Total Construction.

If a company ever wanted to show off its wares, then its own offices are a great advertisement.

Old cracked bricks surround the open-plan working space with modern furnishings, polished floors and designer furniture making it an inviting place to do business for potential clients.

Started almost 25 years ago by Steven Taylor (the number’s guy) and Bill Franks (the practical man), it has grown into a business that services many industries including food and beverage.

READ: Total Construction explains pros and cons of buying and leasing

Heading that department is the affable Tony Tate, a Carlisle man from Cumbria in England’s north who had the distinction of playing against the likes of Alan Shearer, Chris Waddle and Peter Beardsley – not in the English Premier League, but at the more modest school boy level.

It is a memory that is bound to last a life  time. However, Tate then went on to a career in the food industry. Starting out as an electrical engineer, you could almost call Tate the accidental tourist when he arrived on Australian shores.

He never intended to stay for long in Australia, but 20 years later, he is still here.

“I got headhunted from the UK to come to Australia to head up Top Notch, which was the first ready-meal, high-care facility in Australia, which was owned by Goodman Fielder,” said Tate.

“In the UK, the ready-meals industry was booming. Meals had a five- to seven-day shelf life. In Australia, we were trying to break into the market but the downside was that you could go to Darling Harbour and have a good meal for $20 instead of paying $9 for a butter chicken or lasagne from the supermarket shelf. Australia wasn’t ready, so it was probably 20 years too soon.”

When he left Top Notch, Tate started touring Australia with the intention of heading back to the UK, but then stayed when he got a job offer from Goodman Fielder.

After a couple of other roles, Tate started working for Total Construction in 2008, where his expertise in stringent hygiene standards needed for food processing factories came to the fore.

“The key was my food background – especially cutting my teeth on hygienic standards when supplying Marks and Spencers, which were world leaders in hygiene,” said Tate. “In England, 35 years ago, we were already building high-care facilities. They’ve only started putting high-care facilities in Australia over the past five years. In the last 20 years in Australia they only started doing HACCP (hazard analysis critical control point) systems. You get a lot of businesses coming to me who say, ‘we’ve got HACCP approval, aren’t we wonderful’. But to me, that is the minimum you need for food safety.”

Tate cannot reiterate enough how important food hygiene is when companies are looking at building a new food processing facility.

People can become complacent when it comes to instances of food poisoning and think that it is the purview of third-world countries.

Nothing could be further from the truth. As recently as April 2018, six people died from an outbreak of listeria that was traced back to a rock melon farm in New South Wales.

“Hygiene in Australia has been pretty low,” said Tate.

“It’s not being disrespectful. In England, people still die due to food poisoning. About 250,000 Americans die of food poisoning every year. So food safety is pretty critical. I always say people safety is synonymous with food safety.”

Tate knows Total Construction’s main job is to manage the build but believes his knowledge gives the company’s clients a head’s up on what is needed to build a facility to a certain standard.

“When I talk to the clients, they know nothing about building,” he said. “The key from our point of view is to support the client. The client has to put a roof over their head because they have to keep the rain out to protect the product. They’re interested in the process equipment, which can cost them $15 million from Europe. However, they don’t understand standards. We do. They don’t need to know the building codes of Australia. They don’t need to know the FM standards for insurances. That’s what we bring to the table. There are not many food literate builders or process engineers. We have that expertise here.”

Another key to Total Construction is that it offers an all-inclusive service – from design stage to project managing the build. And it is the extra things that it brings to the table that gives clients added value.

This can be anything from advising them whether to build up or out, through to how strong a roof needs to be on a food processing plant.

“You can’t hang your air conditioning, your pipes or other gear from the roof and its trusses if it has been designed to hold up just the tin roof,” said Tate. “I tell the story a couple of years ago when the roof on a retail warehouse collapsed. There was a huge hail storm and the hail blocked the gutters on the roof. It banked up the ice and water, which caused the roof to collapse because it was too heavy.

“Most developers build a warehouse at the cheapest and most economical cost. They don’t build a warehouse with the mind of, ‘Well, we better strengthen it just in case somebody wants to put a food facility inside of it’. With a lot of food processing plant, you could have up to 80 kilograms in various items hanging off the ceiling. This is the kind of thing we tell our clients at the scope stage.”

Another angle that is a little unusual in the building trade is that Total Construction has an open book policy whereby they will show clients how much something is going to cost. They have had issues in the past where some clients have taken a hard look at costings and not been too happy. However, Tate feels that the way they do things takes the sting out of the tail – people know what to expect.

“I have great coverage on the three major trades – hydraulic, mechanical and refrigeration,” he said. “We had one project where the price seemed a little steep for the client, but that was the market cost. All the subcontractors gave me a price based on the drawings. It was an open book to the client and we brought it under 20 per cent on what the price was. He was still a little cranky but deep down he was pleasantly pleased with the service he was getting.”

Another sticky situation arose when a client wanted to be in their facility by a certain month. However, in order to do so, Tate pointed out that the lead time was too short if they wanted to pour a concrete slab that was going to be affected by changes in temperature from 36°C to -18°C.

The temperature needed to come down gradually over a few weeks in order for the slab to retain its integrity. The client wanted it to happen over a period of days. Tate informed the client that the date had to be moved to a later time. The client was not happy and demanded that the facility be ready by the date he wanted to move in.

“I said to him that we could do what he wanted but we were not warranting the slab,” said Tate. “No cement can withstand that about of temperature range over a short space of time. I told him to hire freezer containers for $250 a week, put them in his yard and put the stock in them until we could bring the temperature down gradually. That is all he wanted. A solution. And we gave him one.”

And Tate says the payoff is tangible and can be measured by repeat business. “We get 80 percent repeat business with clients,” said Tate. “I have clients phoning me up that I haven’t spoken to for two years. They go, ‘Mate, I’ve got a problem, can you come down and give us advice?’ I go and help them and I don’t charge. But I know if they are going to build a facility – whether it be Melbourne or Sydney, or up in Queensland – their first port of call is going to be Total Construction.”

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Q-ton water heat pump – a hot water solution https://foodmag.com.au/q-ton-water-heat-pump-a-hot-water-solution/ Thu, 18 Oct 2018 22:17:59 +0000 https://foodmag.com.au/?p=69857 Located in Pontville, Tasmania the Shene Estate and Distillery has been using locally sourced ingredients and traditional methods to produce some of Australia’s best gin and single malt whiskeys. The distillery’s world famous Poltergeist Gin was awarded a Double Gold medal at the 2017 San Francisco International Spirits Competition and a Gold Medal and the … Continue reading Q-ton water heat pump – a hot water solution

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Located in Pontville, Tasmania the Shene Estate and Distillery has been using locally sourced ingredients and traditional methods to produce some of Australia’s best gin and single malt whiskeys.

The distillery’s world famous Poltergeist Gin was awarded a Double Gold medal at the 2017 San Francisco International Spirits Competition and a Gold Medal and the World Gin awards in the same year, making it one of Tasmania’s most celebrated gins.

To produce the award-winning gin and single-malt whiskey, the distillery uses traditional distilling methods which utilises hot water to heat the barley mash.

Each day, 6,000 litres of hot water is required, initially at 90°C, with the temperature then reduced to approximately 64°C-65°C, the optimum temperature to dissolve sugars contained within the starch of malted barley.

READ: Environmentally friendly, cost saving hot water solutions

Finally, the temperature is brought up again to 70°C at the end of the mashing-in process to dissolve enzymes. Given the growing production output of the distillery, this has resulted in a huge amount of water being used each day.

Conventionally, the water used in the above process is heated using an instantaneous electric hot water heater.

However, with ever increasing electricity prices, this was becoming expensive and unsustainable for the business.

While the alternative of gas was originally considered, given the estate is not connected to any gas grid, this was ruled out. An alternative and more energy-efficient hot water solution that could operate in the low outdoor temperatures was required.

The Q-ton is an industry-leading air-to-water heat pump that utilises natural refrigerant CO2 to deliver a reliable and highly efficient hot water solution in even the coldest temperatures.

The Q-ton heat pump draws air through an evaporator that contains CO2 refrigerant, which absorbs the heat in the air. 

The two-stage compressor compresses the refrigerant under high pressure to raise its temperature, while an on-board heat exchanger uses heat from the refrigerant to generate hot water, which is then stored in cylinders for sanitary use.

The Q-ton can deliver continued performance at low outdoor temperature conditions down to -25°C, making it suitable for the colder climates of Tasmania and allowing it to deliver accurate set point heated water, all year round.

The distillery’s existing water heater was only achieving a coefficient of performance (CoP) of 1, resulting in 48kW output from 48kW input.

The Q-ton can achieve a CoP of 4.3, and is able to deliver 30kW of output power while only requiring 7kW input at nominal conditions.

The Q-ton is also energy efficient to run, delivering huge reductions in both running costs and CO2 emissions, with the distillery anticipated to save 60 per cent per year on their energy bills compared to an instantaneous heater.

In addition to this, with the Q-ton’s remote-control scheduling functions, the Q-ton can produce hot water during off peak electricity periods that can be stored in cylinders for later use, offering further cost savings.

Q-ton energy consumption is 76 per cent less than an electric line heater and 46 per cent less than a gas boiler. It produces 74 per cent less CO2 emissions (47 tonnes) than an electric heater and 48 per cent less emissions (23 tonnes) than a gas boiler, making it environmentally friendly.

The Q-ton air-to-water heat pump can be configured as a stand-alone unit, or operate with up to 16 units in modular configuration, providing 3,000 to 100,000 litres of sanitary hot water daily and can be controlled from a touch-screen control panel.

This enables programmability and flexible operation not possible with a conventional hot water system that includes an electric line heater.

By working closely with the owners of the Shene Estate, MHIAA was able to deliver a reliable hot water solution that will reduce the operation’s energy costs and deliver reliable hot water, even throughout Tasmania’s chilly winters.

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Maxum Foods wins at Australian Growth Company Awards https://foodmag.com.au/maxum-foods-wins-australian-growth-company-awards/ Thu, 18 Oct 2018 05:21:34 +0000 https://foodmag.com.au/?p=69854 Maxum Foods has been recognised for its growth from a $2.7 million to a $150m company at the 2018 Australian Growth Company Awards. On October 17, Maxum Foods was named Business Services Growth Company of the Year at a ceremony held in Sydney. The Australian Growth Company Awards were launched in 2012 and celebrate excellence in the mid-market. These awards … Continue reading Maxum Foods wins at Australian Growth Company Awards

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Maxum Foods has been recognised for its growth from a $2.7 million to a $150m company at the 2018 Australian Growth Company Awards.

On October 17, Maxum Foods was named Business Services Growth Company of the Year at a ceremony held in Sydney.

The Australian Growth Company Awards were launched in 2012 and celebrate excellence in the mid-market.

These awards specifically recognise companies that demonstrate high rates of growth, as well as innovation, integrity, contribution to community and sustainable growth.

READ: Maxum Foods makes life easier for food manufacturers across Australia

CEO of Maxum Foods, Ben Woodhouse said he was extremely proud of the small but extremely dedicated team at Maxum Foods.

“Many of our staff have been with us for a long time and have contributed significantly to this growth. It is our internal culture and our ‘never give up’ attitude which has allowed us to grow from nothing in 2003 to where we are today,” said Woodhouse.

Maxum Foods has seen rapid growth since opening its doors in 2003.

The company supplies and manufactures dairy ingredients to the food, health and animal nutrition industries in New Zealand and Australia.

Dustin Boughton and Ben Woodhouse started the company because they saw a gap in the dairy supply chain to offer an exceptional service to food manufacturers from simple things like speedy, on time deliveries, to sourcing multi-origin ingredients and offering technical assistance to research and development teams.

Adding this level of value to the dairy supply chain has enabled Maxum Foods to achieve year-on-year growth since inception in 2003.

In 2003, Maxum Foods had two employees servicing five customers and it sold 600 tonnes of dairy per year with a total revenue of $2.7m.

Fast forward to 2018, the company now has 38 employees servicing 960 customers selling 35,000 tonnes of dairy per year and recorded a total revenue of $150m for 2018.

 

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