Australia gets silver in packaging awards

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) entered seven student design projects for the first time in the WorldStar Student Awards which resulted in a silver in the Sustainability category and all seven teams receiving Certificates of Recognition.

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AIP: How Do I Design a Test if I Don’t Know My Supply Chain? webinar

Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) Members to access ‘How Do I Design a Test if I Don’t Know My Supply Chain’ Webinar for Free

As part of the partnership with the IoPP, all AIP Members will have access to the How Do I Design a Test if I Don’t Know My Supply Chain? webinar on 17 September

The presenter will be Rodney Prater, Principal Packaging Engineer, SC Johnson & Son Inc., who has 26 years in the industry.  Rodney manages the distribution test laboratory at SC Johnson and applicable distribution test protocols.

Problem: How can you properly design, test and validate your product to withstand the rigors of distribution within a region and from one region to another region?

Solution: Understand your supply chain handling process and create a test protocol for more robust and faster validation.

This webinar will walk you through the steps of the intuitive, informative and interactive process map of SC Johnson’s global supply chain environment to assist in product development and validation. You will learn how to utilise process maps to create regional simulated distribution test protocols.

Additionally, you learn how to create a BCT (Box Compression Test) tool and PSF (Product Support Factor) procedure for a corrugate performance-based specification that is supplier agnostic based on the regional supply chain criteria.

Due to the different time zones it would be difficult for AIP Members to attend the live webinar but you can register to view the rebroadcast – simply email info@aipack.com.au  by the 16th of September to register to view the recording.

The AIP will arrange your FREE access to the rebroadcast of this IoPP webinar – a USD$99 saving and special benefit of your AIP membership.

AIP webinar discusses role packaging has in minimising food waste

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) is to discuss the important role that packaging plays in minimising food waste at up-coming APCO Webinar on 26 August

This webinar will be looking at the journey of food from farm to fork and the important role packaging plays in food waste prevention. Globally, one-third of all food produced for human consumption around the world goes to waste and here in Australia the government estimates food waste costs the Australian economy $20 billion each year. As Australian businesses and communities look to phase-out single-use plastic packaging, and redesign their packaging for recoverability, food waste avoidance is another critical issue packaging designers must consider.

Topics for discussion include:

  • An update on the research and projects being delivered within the Fight Food Waste CRC – an organisation that brings together industry, research and the community to capitalise on Australia’s food waste opportunities.
  • Training, tools and resources for businesses working to reduce food waste through packaging
  • Save Food Packaging Design Guidelines
  • Award-winning Best Practice examples of Save Food Packaging Design

Speakers:
Nerida Kelton MAIP
Executive Director
Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP)

Karli Verghese FAIP
Program Leader
Fight Food Waste CRC

Mark Barthel
Special Advisor Food Waste
Fight Food Waste CR

New AIP course: The New World of Plastics Technology – Polymers and recycling

Today, there are hundreds of identified ‘species’ of synthetic polymers. Any of these are available in a range of molecular masses, most can be influenced by processing conditions.? Therefore the choice in plastics is almost limitless. Polymer science is the subfield of materials science concerned with polymers, primarily synthetic polymers such as plastics. The field of polymer science includes researchers in multiple disciplines including chemistry, physics, and engineering.

This course is intended for those that have spent a number of years in some related plastics industry. This course is intended to extend those attending to new levels of understanding the complex world of polymer science. Every attendee will learn new aspects of polymers, test themselves and their ability of remembering what they know. All those wanting to know more about the complex world of polymer science are welcome. The course will cover certain aspects of organic chemistry, revisit the raw materials, syntheses, and applications, only touching on the manufacturing and moulding aspects. It will ensure that those attending are reminded of the main classes of plastic materials as a function of the molecular properties of polymers used in the plastics industry.

It will discuss the molecular structure of plastics in relation to the two main families of plastics, namely thermosets and thermoplastics. In addition we explore plastics recycling. Plastic is versatile and very cheap to produce, it’s no surprise that it’s used so much, but it doesn’t belong in our environment forever. Plastic recycling is the process of recovering scrap or waste plastic and reprocessing the material into useful products. Since the majority of plastic is non-biodegradable, recycling is a part of global efforts to reduce plastic in the waste stream, especially the approximately 8 million metric tonnes of waste plastic that enters the Earth’s ocean every year. We will learn how and what we can do about attaining a better environment with less plastics around.

Course objectives

  • Revisit the basic knowledge of polymer chemistry
  • Know how to quickly identify the mainstream plastics
  • Learn why we use plastics as much as we do, and what are the alternatives
  • The future of plastics and its correlation to recycling of plastics
  • Learning collection systems for recycled plastics
  • What do recyclers do with the plastics
  • What valuable products can be created from recycled plastics
  • Environmental considerations

Who should attend?

This course is  suited to anyone who has limited knowledge on polymers and plastics as a material. In addition, packaging technologists and designers, product developers, marketing personal, technical and production staff using packaging, sales and marketing reps will benefit from this course.

Deadline for PIDA Awards announced

Entries are now open for the 2020 Australasian Packaging Innovation & Design Awards for Australia and New Zealand. The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP), in conjunction with Packaging New Zealand, have designed the Australasian Packaging Innovation & Design Awards (PIDA) to recognise companies and individuals who are making a significant difference in their field in Australia and New Zealand. The PIDA Awards are the exclusive award program for all Australia and New Zealand entries into the prestigious WorldStar Packaging Awards, which are coordinated by the World Packaging Organisation (WPO).

2020 PIDA categories include:

  • Design Innovation of the Year: Food
  • Design Innovation of the Year: Beverage
  • Design Innovation of the Year: Health, Beauty & Wellness
  • Design Innovation of the Year: Domestic & Household
  • Design Innovation of the Year: Labelling & Decoration
  • Sustainable Packaging Special Award
  • Save Food Packaging Design Special Award
  • Accessible Packaging Design Special Award
  • Young Packaging Professional of the Year
  • Industry Packaging Professional of the Year
  • Packaging New Zealand Scholarship

Click here to down load entry forms.

Packaging initiatives designed to reduce food waste

The scale of food waste globally is epic. It is a huge amount of waste. It is probably one of the biggest environmental challenges of our time. Not only because of the food waste itself, but the resources and the cost of that waste. Not only the food that people don’t use and consume, but all the resources wasted going into producing that food.”

Thus said Sealed Air’s sustainability director Alan Adams. He was speaking on the Food Waste Stage at the Australian Waste and Recycling Expo in a session titled The Role of Packaging in Minimising Food Waste. Emceed by FIAL’s manager of food sustainability, Sam Oakden, Adams was joined by the Australian Institute of Packaging’s (AIP) executive director, Nerida Kelton, as well as Mark Barthel, who acts as a special advisor to the Fight Food Waste Cooperative Research Centre (CRC).

Being a plastics packaging specialist, Adams knows that Sealed Air and other companies that use the multi-purpose product are fighting an uphill battle with regard to public perceptions of packaging. Not just plastic, but any type of packaging that is not seen as being biodegradable (at a minimum) or compostable. However, as his title suggests, he, along with the other panellists, champion sustainability.

It is no longer in anybody’s interest to have what can best be described as a laissez faire attitude towards packaging.

For some time now, industry bodies such as the AIP have been pushing for designers to produce smarter and more environmentally friendly packaging. And it’s beginning to pay off. But Adams still belts out statistics that show there is still a long way to go.

“Food that is wasted consumes up to 25 per cent of the world’s potable water,” said Adams. “That’s the environmental cost. Alongside that, the decomposing food we don’t eat generates greenhouse gases, another significant environmental challenge. Then there are the costs including the social cost.

“Every country around the world has some people with food insecurity. It’s criminal that we waste so much food.”

To encourage packaging designers to put their ideas out there, and at the behest of the World Packaging Organisation (WPO), the AIP created the Australasian Packaging Innovation & Design Awards (PIDA).

The awards, which are now in their sixth year, not only reward those designers who think outside the square, but have a more practical purpose – making sure that any ideas that contribute to sustainability and the reduction of food waste become part of the mainstream.

And it’s not just about extending shelf life – although that certainly adds to a reduction in food waste – but other criteria also need to be considered.

A more recent example is how packaging affects people with disabilities.

“If you look at the Arcadis baseline report this year, we have quite high losses in food waste in hospitals and aged care facilities,” said Kelton.

“Anybody designing packaging in Australia and New Zealand has a responsibility to consider this. What we can do to craft better and intuitive designs that can minimise food waste for people who have difficulty opening a package? It is not only the ageing population that has issues with difficult-to-open packaging; it is also people with disabilities, arthritis sufferers and even children. People can’t grip, open or close the product, which can be a huge issue.”

Having spent quite a bit of time in the UK recently, Barthel had some interesting insights into that market – some of which he wishes he could implement here. He worked in a behavioural interventions lab in the UK whereby they spoke to businesses and consumers about some of the challenges around food waste and came up with interesting ideas on how to reduce it.

“For example, with a standard size loaf of bread, we were finding that, more often than not, the last quarter of the loaf was ending up as waste,” said Barthel. “We worked with a couple of bakery companies and tested some visual cues. By the time a consumer got to the last part of the loaf, there was message on the packaging that said ‘freeze me, and toast me later’.

“It was mapping into a clear visual clue. It’s normalising behaviour – in this case freezing bread to store it properly so you don’t waste it.

“It is really a neat piece of behavioural intervention. It’s a combination of understanding behavioural science and how you communicate that science to consumers, and the language, and using visual cues that they will get.”

Adams also came up with an example of the avocado, which made up part of entry in the Save Food Packaging Design Special Award in the PIDAs. One company had packaged avocados in such a way that the shelf life was extended markedly.

“Extending the shelf life of a product should be an obvious thing to do to reduce food waste,” he said. “It gives us more time to consume the product, more time to buy it, more time to enjoy it.

“What this company did was effectively make a guacamole product that had a shelf life of 90 days. An unseen win for this, was that when adding more shelf life, they also increased the processing window of the avocado industry. This enabled the industry to create products they can sell, therefore increasing the amount of harvest it utilised,” Adams said.
A lot of food that is produced, particularly in fresh produce, doesn’t even get off the farm, according to Adams. It doesn’t get sold or a chance to be eaten. Some packaging strategies can enable solutions that can help consumers use a larger slice of harvest.

Kelton also outlined how criteria for the Save Food Packaging Design special awards are evolving, with food waste playing an important part when a product is being considered for an award.

Measures include its resealability, openability, portion control, consumer convenience, extension of shelf life and barrier, recyclability, as well as smart and intelligent packaging and more.

“One of the most discussed criteria at the moment is; how do we meet the 2025 National Packaging targets , offer small portions, and provide consumer convenience?” said Kelton.
“That is where we hope the Save Food Packaging CRC project, led by the AIP, will engage with surveys, research, PhDs etc, as part of a project to better understand how it works and come up with really smart and intuitive design ideas that we can start implementing.”

Another topic covered during the session was that of Life Cycle Assessments (LCAs), which all three panellists agreed, that while laborious, are important in the designing process. While LCAs are not mandatory, the amount of information that can be garnered from doing one can be invaluable to both the designer and the customer.

“When it comes to LCAs, very few companies that I come across and I work with have a defined sustainable packaging strategy,” said Adams. “And if you don’t know where you are going, LCAs can be a waste of time, or potentially give the wrong result. I think it is incumbent on all of us to figure out what our objective is for the environment.”

“Optimisation, recycled content, functionality, shelf life extension – all of these things are important when it comes to designing packaging,” said Barthel. “An LCA is a really good way of underpinning that, although in saying that, I would be happy if I never had to do another LCA study in my entire life because they are so detailed. But, they have to be.”

“For the institute, LCAs are really important for all packaging designers and packaging specialists to do,” said Kelton.

“If you are not doing LCAs at the moment, you are going to miss out. How you are going to help customers? Because if you can find what the true impacts are across your value chain, then you can communicate that.

“It’s really important to the tell the customer what you are doing and why you are doing it. If you are extending the shelf life of meat because you are using vacuum packaging, tell them.”

One thing all three agreed on – and has been a theme being pushed by the AIP especially over the past 12 months – is that processors and manufacturers have to do a better job of selling packaging to consumers. A lot of the time it is seen as the “bad boy” of the supermarket shelf space, when in fact most companies are doing their utmost to not only reduce the amount of packaging they use, but also trying to extend the life of on-the-shelf products. Barthel put it succinctly when he summed up the packaging versus food waste conundrum.

Barthel has the last word on where food waste stands in the pecking order of having an effect on greenhouse gas production in the UK, but whose numbers can be easily transposed to Australia, too.

“The latest WRAP (Waste and Resources Action Plan) estimates that the total carbon footprint of food and drink consumed in the UK is 130 million tonnes CO2 eq per year,” he said.

“This is approximately equivalent (eq) to a fifth of UK territorial emissions, or two tonnes of CO2 eq per person per year.

“Excluding emissions from wasted items, the average impact of a tonne of food and drink purchased is 3.4 tonnes CO2 eq, rising to 3.8 tonnes of CO2 eq per tonne of food alone.”

Future of Soft Plastics Technical event Part II

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) is pleased to advise that due to popular demand and the recent success of the Future of Soft Plastics Technical event that was held in Victoria, a lunch time version will be held on the 17 of July in New South Wales and all of industry is invited to attend.

The AIP, along with their many industry members, are concerned about current discussions and challenges directed at ‘single use plastic’ packaging and this technical seminar will help to guide you and your teams to better understand the current and true state-of-play with Soft Plastics in Australia.

Discussions will include understanding the issues surrounding Soft Plastics and the important benefits this packaging format brings (food safety, convenience and reducing food waste). Speakers will provide insights into some of the excellent initiatives that are already underway in the country to effectively recycle this packaging format.

This technical seminar will focus on soft plastics and the current recycling programs being undertaken and the evening is aimed at challenging the industry to be more involved in promoting a better understanding of the benefits and opportunities for soft plastics.

Speakers will include: Caitlyn Richards, Responsible Sourcing Manager, Sustainable Products and Packaging, Coles Group, Peter Tamblyn, Sales & Marketing Manager Asia Pacific, Close the Loop, Mark Jacobson, Marketing Director, Replas, Anthony Peyton MAIP, Director, PREP Design and Keith Chessell, AIP Board Member, APCO

AIP Members pack 2175kgs of potatoes and carrots for KiwHarvest

As a part of the Australian Institute of Packaging’s commitment to Fighting Food Waste two teams of Members headed to KiwiHarvest in Auckland, NZ over the last month to help pack 2175 kgs of potatoes and carrots into approx. 145x 15kg bags. The bags KiwiHarvest use are the malt bags from boutique breweries which saves them from going to waste as well.

The recipients who receive the potatoes and carrots are all over Auckland from Orewa in the North to Pukekohe in the South. The completed bags are given to foodbanks to distribute to individual families, used for community meals such as Everybody Eats, charities like Shine Womens Refuge, schools.

So who are KiwiHarvest?
KiwiHarvest are New Zealand’s perishable food rescuers; collecting good food before it goes to waste and distributing it to those in need to nourish the wider community. Every month they deliver over 60,000 kgs of food to 220 charities nationally. Their work is already changing the fact that 103,000 tonnes of food is thrown away by New Zealand industry every year. KiwiHarvest is here to create lasting positive change so that good food does not go to waste. Moreover, those that need nourishment will receive it. KiwiHarvest reduces the negative impacts of food waste on our environment by redistributing excess food; helping to create lasting positive social change by nourishing those in need.

So how can AIP Members and industry colleagues help KiwiHarvest?
Join our AIP KiwiHarvest Volunteer Program; either as an individual, with your staff and colleagues, or even with your families. The AIP will work directly with KiwiHarvest to book in some days where our volunteers can visit the Ellerslie Warehouse and help pick and pack fresh vegetables into sacks. The day will start with a formal introduction on how KiwiHarvest works and information on their charity partners. The AIP will be offering more volunteer days throughout the year for NZ industry.

AIP supports Certified Packaging Professional roll out

As the peak professional body for packaging education and training in Australasia it is paramount that the Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) offers professional designations that are internationally recognised and have the ability to raise the profession of packaging technologists and designers across the globe. Such a designation is the CPP; which is a registered trademark of the Institute of Packaging Professionals (IoPP) in the United States.
Since 1972, IoPP has awarded over 2000 qualified applicants the designation Certified Packaging Professional (CPP) and is recognised as the premier designation in the industry signifying excellence as a packaging professional.

Candidates achieve the CPP designation by demonstrating industry expertise and experience, measured through a flexible applicant testing process.

Attaining the CPP recognises the designation as a commitment to excellence in the packaging profession and the credential demonstrates that a packaging practitioner possesses packaging knowledge, experience and skills to the degree that they deserve recognition as a true packaging professional. CPP’s are in demand
as speakers and as leaders on packaging teams.

Approximately three years ago, the AIP approached the IoPP about the possibility of rolling out the CPP program into Australia. Since then, the AIP announced that the region has 20 certified packaging professionals, with enrolments coming in every week from across Australia, New Zealand and Asia.

As a member country of the World Packaging Organisation (WPO), the AIP recently agreed to provide support for CPP program roll outs for other countries across the globe. This has been to ensure that the CPP designation and the packaging profession is recognised globally. WPO member countries that are in the process of the rollout include Nigeria, Brazil, South Africa and Singapore with many others to follow shortly.

The CPP designation is now internationally recognised by several organisations including the IoPP, the AIP and the WPO.

By encouraging other countries to roll out the CPP program the aim is to see packaging technology and design become more globally recognised as a profession, which in turn will encourage more people to attain greater packaging skills and knowledge.

The flow-on effect will be more people developing long-term careers in packaging across the globe.

The CPP designation should also assist companies to recognise and employ highly skilled packaging professionals through various means including international transfers and exchange programs.

Attaining the CPP designation is an excellent investment in a packaging professional’s development and the credential defines the packaging professional, allowing organisations to seek out and hire the right professional based on verified knowledge, skills and industry contributions.

In an ideal world, all companies who are hiring packaging professionals should ensure that the CPP designation is a recognised and required skill-set for the hiring and promotion processes.

The CPP is the premier designation in the industry, signifying excellence as a packaging professional.

The most recent IoPP salary survey has revealed that CPPs earn anywhere between seven per cent and 10 per cent more than their co-workers who don’t have the certification.
Using the CPP program to assess and evaluate one’s professional competency will validate the person as internationally proficient as a packaging professional.

Nerida Kelton MAIP
Executive Director – Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP)
ANZ Board Member – World Packaging Organisation (WPO)

AIP takes sustainable packaging design course to New Zealand

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP), in conjunction with Packaging New Zealand, will be taking their new “Introduction to Sustainable Packaging Design” half-day training course and Materials Recycling Facility (MRF) visit to Auckland on the February 13, 2019.

The course is designed to assist anyone who is responsible in their business to make packaging changes to meet ‘War on Waste’ questions, changes to retailer and consumer trends and behaviours; while not spending any more money at the end.

It will provide attendees a better understanding of the practical guidelines and criteria needed to design and develop sustainable packaging including the Sustainability Hierarchy of Reduce, Reuse then Recycle and the Circular Economy approach to packaging and the environment.

Discussions will also cover plastic, glass and metal packaging and their impact on the environment and whether the use of non-renewable resources, plant-based bioplastics, compostable and recycled materials and various tools can assist their business to understand the full life of packaging.

READ: AIP will run food waste and packaging seminars at FoodTech PackTech

This will involve the impact of ‘Food or Product Waste’.

Participants will be invited to bring with them a sample of their company’s packaging materials to use as a case study.

As part of the course, attendees will visit a Material Recovery Facility (MRF) to expose participants to the realities of a working MRF facilities, their equipment, limitation and material handling issues.

The participants will get an understanding of what is and is not separated out for possible recycling, and why. This is followed by understanding the next stage of the recycling process after the MRF, for example the current five material beneficiation processes.

Course objectives:

  1. To provide participants an understanding of the current environmental issues that are impacting the producers of packaging and the manufacturers and retailers of packaged product.
  2. To provide participants an understanding of sustainable packaging design and the practical design guidelines and approaches required in the packaging design process including End of Life (EoL) thinking.
  3. To provide participants with a better view of Best Practice Examples and Case Studies of award-winning Sustainable Packaging and Save Food Packaging innovations.

Who should attend?

If you are responsible for your business’s packaging design, performance or purchase specification, then you should attend. Packaging Designers, Technologists and Engineers, anyone responsible for Environmental Strategy Development, Marketing & Sales, Graphic Designers.

Presenter:

Ralph Moyle FAIP, CPP, education coordinator for AIP.

Moyle is an experienced food-packaging consultant with 40 years in the food processing industry and 20 year’s focused on packaging.

Through a unique range of senior management experiences in Packaging, Operations, Technical and Quality Assurance in large and medium FMCG businesses, Moyle has brought increased value to many organisations through the value of smarter packaging at less waste.

Moyle’s packaging knowledge has resulted in successful contemporary designs and material selections, improved shelf life, lower material costs, shorter supply chains and environmentally-friendly selections that have provided greater economic value.

Moyle is a past National President of the AIP, a Certified Packaging Professional (CPP) and a Fellow of the AIP.

Foodbank shows behind-the-scenes process with volunteer program

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) has continued its long-standing partnership with Foodbank by introducing a new volunteering day in Victoria, which allows members to find out how the organisation operates.

The first day held in late October and the AIP Foodbank Warehouse Volunteering Program will continue in 2019.

It allows members and their colleagues to work directly with Foodbank Victoria to help the Yarraville Warehouse pick and pack on-line orders and mixed grocery boxes.

The program provides the opportunity to better understand how Foodbank works and is a combination of picking and packing of on-line food orders and packing mixed grocery boxes.

READ: AIP president explains biodegradable and compostable packaging

The on-line orders have been placed by many of the 470 charity partners who look after the thousands of Victorians currently experiencing food insecurity.

The mixed groceries items are donated by school students, community groups, clubs and corporate organisations who run food drives to provide the ingredients for the food boxes.

Their charity partners are able to order these boxes which they then pass on to those families or individuals who need that extra help with grocery items.

The volunteering program provides vital work supporting struggling Victorians.

Members have supported numerous charities across the state by packing their food orders, packing around 1600 boxes of cans and also packing a range of mixed vegetables for Foodbank Victoria.

Together the AIP team packed a 21,459kg – equivalent to about 38,256 meals for the community.

That is the equivalent of feeding a family of four, three meals a day for about nine years.

AIP will continue this program in 2019 and will be announcing new dates shortly and everyone is invited to join.

Businesses learn about sustainable packaging that minimises food waste

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) lead training and education programs as a part of FoodTech Packtech, which was held in Auckland last week.

Over the three days, in September, AIP provided discussions on key issues that are challenging the food and beverage industries.

Discussions included fighting food waste, save food and sustainable packaging designs, the issues within end-of-life recycling facilities and a better understanding of lifecycle analysis.

AIP had a full house for the new half-day training course on the role of packaging in minimising food waste with attendees including staff from Frucor, Fonterra, Danone, and  Multivac.

READ: AIP will run food waste and packaging seminars at FoodTech PackTech

The course provided participants with an introduction to the seriousness of food waste in Australia and New Zealand and how we can all make a difference as team members of the product-packaging design process to this issue.

It also covered packaging design criteria for best-practice save food packaging design developments that should be considered.

Key takeaways from the attendees included a new focus on what a business needs to do to improve its packaging design.

Businesses gained a better understanding of the true benefits that packaging plays in minimising food waste and a better awareness that packaging does have a role to play in relation to food loss.

Key takeaways from the attendees of the fighting food waste, save food and sustainable packaging design seminar included gaining a better view of the current issues in sustainable packaging design.

One attendee said that once packaging is designed, businesses need to start looking at the next step in improvements as the journey never ends.

AIP had a joint stand with Packaging New Zealand that showcased all the 2018 Packaging Innovation and Design Award winners for both Australia and New Zealand and the WorldStar Packaging Awards.

The Australian Institute of Packaging will be a partner of the next FoodTech PackTech event in 2020.

Australian Institute of Packaging joins Save Food initiative to fight food waste

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) has joined the Save Food initiative as part of its commitment to the United Nations sustainable development goal and the national food waste strategy in Australia.

Save Food is a joint initiative of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, the United Nations Environment Programme, Messe Düsseldorf, and interpack – the leading global trade fair for packaging and processes.

The goal is to fight global food waste and loss through a global alliance of all stakeholders.

Messe Düsseldorf processing and packaging global portfolio director, Bernd Jablonowski, said the role of packaging in reducing food waste is crucial.

READ: AIP will run food waste and packaging seminars at FoodTech PackTech

“The Save Food packaging awards have already proven that our industry has innovative ideas to emphasise that role. Being part of the Save Food Initiative communicates the industry’s potential to the relevant stakeholders and encourages new projects and ideas to reduce food loss and waste,” said Jablonowski.

AIP executive director Nerida Kelton said the institute launched the Save Food Packaging Design awards three years ago, in conjunction with the World Packaging Organisation and the Save Food program to encourage improved food packaging design that minimises food waste.

“Australia was the first country in the world to accept the World Packaging Organisation invitation to initiate this award with Australia and New Zealand winners showcased at the international interpack trade exhibition in Germany during May, 2017.

“In May 2018 two of the award winners showcased at interpack went on to receive the Gold and Bronze Save Food Packaging Design Special Awards from the WorldStar Packaging Awards.

“The winning Save Food Packaging designs include advances in extension of shelf life, portion control, improved use-by-date information and on-pack communication, openability and resealability to help prevent wastage of packaged foods,” said Kelton.

“The Australian Institute of Packaging wants to encourage global industry support to ensure the widespread implementation of these world-leading innovations. It will make a huge difference if improved Save Food Packaging design becomes standard criteria for all manufacturers globally,” she said.

“The packaging industry needs a global platform like the Save Food initiative that can accelerate positive change. We can’t have a fragmented approach if we expect to see necessary improvements in packaging design that minimises food waste,” said Kelton.

 

AIP will run food waste and packaging seminars at FoodTech PackTech

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP), in conjunction with Packaging New Zealand, will be running a two-hour seminar on fighting food waste, save food packaging and sustainable packaging design on the 20th of September at FoodTech PackTech 2018.

Seminar – Part one: Fighting food waste and the role of packaging in minimizing food waste. Will solving New Zealand’s food waste problem help save hunger in the country?  

More than 122,500 tonnes of food waste, or the equivalent to $872 million worth of edible food, is thrown away every year in New Zealand.
The avoidable food waste could feed 50,000 and 80,000 people a year.
There is not only a social imperative to solve this problem, but also an economic one.
This seminar helps people find out how they can play a role in minimising food waste.
KiwiHarvest CEO Deborah Manning will speak at the seminar.

Fight food waste cooperative research centre: New collaboration to tackle Australia’s food waste issue.  

In April 2018 the Fight Food Waste Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) received a $30m grant from the Australian Government’s CRC program.
The Fight Food Waste CRC involves 60 participants from around Australia and overseas, who collectively raised $103m in addition to the $30m from the CRC Program.
This initiative will be an Australia-first bringing industry, government and research bodies collectively and collaboratively together to tackle the food waste problem in this country. At this seminar, people can find out how New Zealand companies can get involved in the CRC program and how they can roll out their own waste strategy.

The important role that packaging plays in minimising food waste.

While the primary function of packaging is to protect its contents, the function of packaging to reduce food waste is rarely discussed.
The connection between packaging design and food waste needs to be discussed more openly.
People can find out how packaging companies, food manufacturers and retailers can make a difference as team members of the product-packaging design process to this issue.
People can learn more about save food packaging design innovations that have come from Australia and New Zealand and understand how designing packaging to save food actually saves food.

Speakers include Dr Karli Verghese PhD, FAIP, Reducing Supply Chain Losses research program leader and Lars Ljung, special projects coordinator, Planet Protector Packaging.

Seminar ­­– Part two: Moving towards sustainable packaging by 2025.  

Every day on the news there is a new article about banning single use plastics, multinational companies pledging to move towards 100 per cent sustainable packaging, plastic free aisles and more.
This discussion will help you to better understand the current conversations in the industry, changes to regulations, how it all relates to you and what tools are available to move towards sustainable packaging.
Hear about the Australasian Recycling Label, the PREP tool and from award-winning packaging experts on how to incorporate reduce, reuse, repurpose, recycle and the circular economy approach into all of your future packaging design.

Speakers include Sharon Humphreys, executive director of Packaging New Zealand and Alejandra Laclette, recycling label program manager at Planet Ark Environmental Foundation.

AIP Half-Day Training Course alongside FoodTech PackTech 2018:

AIP is also offering a half-day training course as an additional event at FoodTech PackTech 2018.
AIP has developed a new half-day training course on the Role of Packaging in Minimising Food Waste with all of industry invited to attend.

Australian Institute of Packaging to introduce sustainable packaging design course

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) will be launching its new Introduction to Sustainable Packaging Design half-day training course.

The course is designed to assist anyone who is responsible for making packaging changes in their business to meet ‘war on waste’ questions, changes to retailer and consumer trends and behaviours, while not spending any more money.

The course will provide attendees a better understanding of the practical guidelines and criteria needed to design and develop sustainable packaging.

This includes the sustainability hierarchy of reduce, reuse then recycle, and the circular economy approach to packaging and the environment.

READ: AIP to discuss consumer & environmental trends in plastics

Discussions will also cover plastic, glass and metal packaging and their impact on the environment.

It will also cover whether the use of non-renewable resources, plant-based bioplastics, compostable and recycled materials and various tools can assist businesses to understand the full life of packaging.

Participants will be invited to bring with them a sample of their company’s packaging materials to use as a case study.

As part of the course, attendees will visit a material recovery facility to expose participants to the realities of a working these facilities, their equipment, limitation and material handling issues.

The visit to the material recovery facility will take place on the 17th October in Melbourne.

The participants will get an understanding of what is and is not separated out for possible recycling, and why.

This is followed by understanding the next stage of the recycling process after the material recovery facility.

The course aims to provide participants an understanding of the current environmental issues that are impacting the producers of packaging and the manufacturers and retailers of packaged product.

It will provide participants an understanding of sustainable packaging design and the practical design guidelines and approaches required in the packaging design process including end of life thinking.

It will also provide participants with a better view of best practice examples and case studies of award-winning sustainable packaging and save food packaging innovations.

People who are responsible for a business’s packaging design, performance or purchase specification, are encouraged to attend.

This includes packaging designers, technologists and engineers, anyone responsible for environmental strategy development, marketing and sales, and graphic designers.

Presenters include AIP education coordinator Ralph Moyle.

Moyle is an experienced food-packaging consultant, with 40 years in the food processing industry and 20 years focus on packaging.

 

Australian Institute of Packaging expands its food charity reach into Victoria

For more than eight years, the has Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) been a supporter of Foodbank across Australia through the Queensland hamper program.

It is now pleased to also introduce the Victorian Warehousing Volunteer Program. 

The AIP has spent its Christmas Party every year for the past seven years with a twist.

The members pack Foodbank hampers for people who need some assistance from their community at Christmas time.

READ: Woolworths Ltd packaging technologist wins top AIP award

In 2017, more than 150 people packed 1,100 hampers for Foodbank to provide to those in need during the holiday season.

The hampers included 800 family hampers and 300 ladies’ packs. The total valuing more than $73,000 worth of items that were either donated, or the funds raised for, by the Association and the wider industry

Over the last seven years, the team has packed 6,500 hampers to the value of close to $730,000 for people in need and they look forward to packing even more hampers in 2018.

All of industry is invited to donate items or funds to the hampers, or attend and participate at Eagle Farm Racetrack on the 7th of December 2018.

AIP asks for all those in the industry to join its new Warehouse Volunteering Program; either as an individual, with staff and colleagues, or with families.

AIP will work directly with Foodbank Victoria to book in some days where volunteers can visit the Yarraville Warehouse and help pick and pack on-line orders and mixed grocery boxes.

The day will start with a formal introduction on how Foodbank Victoria works and information on their charity partners.

The program will provide volunteers the opportunity to better understand how Foodbank works and will be a combination of picking and packing of on-line food orders and packing mixed grocery boxes.

The on-line orders have been placed by many of the 470 charity partners who look after the thousands of Victorians currently experiencing food insecurity.

The mixed groceries items
are donated by school students, community groups, clubs and corporate organisations who run food drives to provide the ingredients for the food boxes.

Their charity partners are able to order these boxes, which they then pass on to those families or individuals who need that extra help with grocery items.

Each volunteer will have the opportunity to work in both areas.

Shifts would be for four to five hours.

As a part of its commitment to the National Food Waste Strategy and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 12:3, AIP
is focused on providing long-term education and training on the role of packaging in minimising food waste, save food packaging, sustainable packaging and lifecycle analysis.

AIP also has a representative on the Department of the Environment and Energy National Food Waste Steering Committee and is a contributor of the Fight Food Waste Cooperative Research Centre.

Australian Institute of Packaging supports newly-launched digital print centre

A new digital print centre at Holmesglen will provide quality industry training.

Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) members and industry colleagues are heading to the newly-launched digital print centre on the 5th of September.

Located at the Chadstone campus, the digital centre will help contribute to increased learning opportunities to the Institute’s printing courses.

Printing is a global industry using the most advanced digital technologies alongside traditional print processes.

READ: AIP to discuss consumer & environmental trends in plastics

Holmesglen courses provide the skills to work in this highly competitive industry.

From conventional forms to ink-jet technologies, large format printing, digital printing and packaging applications and digital label printing, the printed form remains highly relevant in a digital world.

It will be led by industry-experts such as Andrew Readman – an AIP lecturer in the Master of Food and Packaging Innovation course.

Holmesglen is leading the way for future generations of printing and design professionals.

Attendees will be able to see demonstrations of the Sinapse computer simulation presses, lithography, heatset web, coldest web, flexography, central impression and corrugated board.

People can also find out about live prints to the range of Konica Minolta digital presses, EFI workstation RIPS and HP wide format inkjets.

A demonstration of Holmesglen’s online learning portal, Brightspace, and courses are also offered.

 

Melbourne food and packaging students seek internships

There’s a push for companies in the food and packaging sector to offer industry internships  as part of a Melbourne-based Master of Food and Packaging Innovation degree.

The University of Melbourne, along with Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP), are seeking companies to give students hand-on experience in the industry.

The course is a post-graduate degree, which trains students in the area food packaging processes and design.

Students completing the two-year degree, study food science, food safety, packaging materials and processes, packaging design, consumer behaviour, product innovation, entrepreneurship, business management, and marketing.

MORE: Internships land for Master of Food and Packaging Innovation Program 

Companies can benefit from offering an internship by assessing them as possible future employees.

Interns have the chance to receive some extra help with research or projects. They can also inspire new ideas and help problem-solve.

Many of the interns have worked in a diverse range of fields prior to undertaking the Master Degree and bring a range of skills obtained through previous employment.

A required of the course is to undertake 120-200 hours of work as part of the internship.

The hours can be taken over weeks or months, depending on the needs of the company.

There’s an urgent need for companies to offer internships as two students currently require positions.