2018 PIDA Awards – winners announced

The winners of the 2018 Packaging & Processing Innovation & Design Awards (PIDA) were announced at a ceremony on the Gold Coast last night.

The PIDA Awards recognise companies and individuals who are making a significant difference in their field across Australia and New Zealand, and are the exclusive feeder program for the prestigious WorldStar Packaging Awards.

The awards ceremony, which took place at the Marriott Hotel Surfers Paradise was held in conjunction with the 2018 Australian Institute of Packaging Conference. That event concludes this afternoon.

The full list of winners –

2018 Design Innovation of the Year Award – Beverage Category

8Kangaroos by ILNAM Estate and Polatote by Lactote (joint winners)

Machinery/Equipment category: Container Deposit Systems Australia (CDSA) Vision & Sorting System by SAGE Automation.

 

2018 Design Innovation of the Year Award – Food Category

Radix Nutrition foil packaging breakfast pouch by Cas-Pak Products

Machinery/Equipment category: Scott LEAP suite of technologies fully-integrated lamb processing system developed by Scott Automation & Robotics, in conjunction with Silverfern Farms and Meat & Livestock Australia.

 

2018 Design Innovation of the Year Award – Health, Beauty & Wellness

Flip-cap closure with ring-peel induction seal liner by West Wadding.

 

2018 Design Innovation of the Year Award – Domestic & Household

Precise Pour for continuous pour, anti-clog and tamper-evidence by Caps and Closures.

 

2018 Sustainable Packaging Design Award

Materials & Packaging category: ICEE Containers biofoam PLA insulated boxes.

Machinery & Equipment category: CogniPRO Link for the meat processing industry by Sealed Air Australia.

 

2018 Industry Packaging Professional of the Year Award

Craig Wellman FAIP, CEO of Wellman Packaging.

 

2018 APPMA Scholarship

Nathan Leong MAIP, a packaging and product technologist, Primo Smallgoods.

 

2018 Packaging Council of New Zealand Scholarship

Jaco Scheepers, packaging technologist, Synlait Milk.

 

2018 Young Packaging Professional of the Year Award

Regan Foster AAIP, director of Omniverse, Foster Packaging.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fundamentals of Packaging Technology

The 2018 AIP National Conference, taking place at the Gold Coast on 2-3 May, will offer a unique opportunity to undertake three of the most popular modules of the on-line Fundamentals of Packaging Technology (FBT) course as residential training.

Attendees will receive training by one of the US-based trainers from the Fundamentals of Packaging Technology Course that is now available on-line through the AIP.

The FPT course is designed as bite-sized modules and is set up for the convenience of busy working professionals, and the training platform is functionally intuitive. It offers the option to complete training when your time allows, and at your own pace.

To be led by Jane Chase (pictured), Chief Executive Officer of the IoPP in the US, the session will present three of the most popular FPT modules and will help packaging professionals to better understand the FPT course and available units and lessons.

The session will include: FPT03-1 Paper and Paperboard Materials, FPT03-03 Corrugated Fibreboard and FPT07-01 Bottle Design Criteria. At no other time will the ANZ industry be offered residency-training for this course.

Major packaging conference heading to Gold Coast

The 2018 Australian Institute of Packaging National Conference takes place at Marriott Resort, Surfers Paradise on 2-3 May, 2018.

Designed for packaging designers, technologists, engineers, sales and marketing people the biennial conference is the largest packaging and processing conference of its kind in Australia and New Zealand.

Run by industry for industry the AIP National Conference has been leading the way in professional and personal development for decades and is a part of the annual Packaging & Processing Week.

In 2018 Member Countries from the World Packaging Organisation (WPO) will be heading to Australia to speak and participate in the week.

The AIP is also hosting the prestigious international WorldStar Packaging Awards and the 2018 PIDA Awards as the gala dinner for the conference, a Women in Industry Breakfast Forum and five international editors from the International Packaging Press Organisation (IPPO) will be guest speakers during the two days.

It is anticipated that over 30 countries will be heading to Australia; making it a truly international must-attend educational event.

In search of environmentally friendly shopping bags

Free plastic carrier bags will disappear from Australia’s two largest supermarkets in 2018. There are many arguments for and against this change, as it is important to look at the all environmental impacts of their alternatives. Dr Carol Kilcullen-Lawrence writes.

Free plastic carrier bags are often referred to as single use; however, this doesn’t take into account their downstream use as bin liners for example. Studies show that, in South Australia when this change occurred, sales of bags for refuse massively increased. In many cases, these bin liners are heavier than carrier bags, so more plastic reaches landfill. Additionally, if light-weight supermarket bags are replaced with thicker bags that customers pay a small fee for, while these are designed to be reusable for a while, if they eventually end up as bin liners the negative environmental impact is even greater.

In Europe they have taken some steps to avoid this use of the sturdier bags for refuse, by describing them as a ‘Bag for Life’ so when they are no longer suitable for carrying groceries, they can be returned to the supermarket for recycling and replaced with a new one free of charge. It’s important to point out however that the colourful branding with supermarket logos etc. provides another negative environmental impact compared to plain light- weight bags.

Many would be surprised at the findings when sustainability of different carrier bags is assessed throughout their full lifecycle. A common reaction is to assume paper bags have the lowest environmental impact. In fact, although studies vary, all agree that paper bags have higher or equal environmental impact (depending upon which specific impact is being measured) as light- weight plastic bags and fabric reusable bags. Paper is only more favourable if measuring eutrophication, as manufacturing and recycling paper carrier bags has a lower impact on our waterways in terms of release of nutrients. In considering other types of environmental impact, resource use, energy and greenhouse gas production, the most favourable carrier bags are light-weight plastic and reusable fabric bags.

Looking more closely at reusable fabric bags, focus clearly needs to shift to how many times they are actually reused. To ensure their impact remains the most favourable they must be reused at least 100 times, with some analysis claiming this can be as high as 175 times. This varies depending on their actual composition, be it PP, PET, cotton or hemp and the like. Many are not sturdy enough to last the distance, in terms of stitching etc. Some customers also raise concerns about hygiene and no studies have taken into account the impacts of regularly washing bags.

While not as numerous as supermarket bags, it would be good to see investigations into other types of free shopping bags at retail outlets. The formats of these are wide and variable – high quality, heavy- weight, paper and plastic – many with elaborate ribbon and cord handles so that when customers recycle them, they are unlikely to deconstruct them into separate components that are compatible with recycling together.

Many DIY stores are giving customers access to cardboard packaging that their goods have been delivered to the store in. This was popular for groceries in many parts of the world years ago. While this could be acceptable to many customers, space is premium in supermarkets and this may not fit with the in-store image large chains want to portray.

Once light-weight carrier bags are gone, will the focus shift to the smaller light-weight grocery bags used for customers to select their own loose produce? Increasingly, there are options emerging to buy fabric reusable versions of these and in reality they could themselves be reused several times as they are not subject to the stresses put on carrier bags.

There are so many factors that come into play when assessing which carrier bags are truly best for the environment. An Australia-wide approach is more likely to achieve the best outcome, rather than individual states and supermarket chains making random decisions. Light-weight plastic carrier bags are not necessarily the worst environmental option, so perhaps the focus needs to move to offering customers effective ways to recycle them. Essentially, their composition is almost identical to many soft plastics used to package all types of products used in the home, and courier bags from online shopping. We shouldn’t accept that these are destined for landfill. Light-weight plastic carrier bags can be diverted into schemes that are emerging for such household waste.

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Dr Carol Kilcullen-Lawrence FAIP PhD is National President of the Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP). 

2018 packaging scholarship now open

The Australian Packaging and Processing Machinery Association (APPMA) in conjunction with the Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) has opened submissions for its tenth annual scholarship program which will enable one lucky packaging technologist, designer or engineer in Australia the opportunity to complete a Diploma in Packaging Technology to the value of $9,000.

The Diploma in Packaging Technology is a Level 5 qualification which is internationally recognised for those wishing to pursue a career in the packaging industry or for those who are already in the industry and who wish to extend their knowledge and expertise. The Diploma prepares students to take responsibility for packaging operations at any level through the supply chain. The qualification is comprehensive, and provides an opportunity to study the principles of packaging, packaging materials and packaging processes.

Diploma in Packaging Technology students are from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines, and are typically experienced practitioners or managers in technical, sales/marketing, QA, purchasing, engineering or design.

Completion of the Diploma in Packaging Technology demonstrates your commitment to your career and to the industry.  Delegates who successfully complete the Diploma are equipping themselves for senior positions within the packaging industry.

The APPMA annual Scholarship Program has been running for ten years and is a part of the Association’s on-going commitment to ensuring that individuals have the opportunity to further their education within the packaging industry. The 2018 APPMA Scholarship Winner will be announced at the 2018 Packaging & Processing Innovation & Design Awards which will be held in conjunction with the prestigious international WorldStar Packaging Awards on the 2 May at Surfers Paradise, Queensland.

NZ packaging scholarship launched

The Packaging Council of New Zealand is launching a new annual Scholarship program, in conjunction with the Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP), that will enable one packaging technologist, designer or engineer in New Zealand the opportunity to complete a Diploma in Packaging Technology to the value of $9,000.

“The association is extremely proud to be able to offer the scholarship to a New Zealand packaging professional each year,” commented Harry Burkhardt, President of the Packaging Council of New Zealand.

“The packaging industry is dynamic and diverse, offering career opportunities across a wide scope of disciplines. PAC.NZ has been representing businesses in the packaging industry in New Zealand since 1992 and recognises that investment in the packaging industry starts with investment in its people. We strongly encourage everyone in the industry to apply for this scholarship.

“The Diploma in Packaging Technology is a Level 5 qualification which is internationally recognised for those wishing to pursue a career in the packaging industry or for those who are already in the industry and who wish to extend their knowledge and expertise. The Diploma in Packaging Technology prepares students to take responsibility for packaging operations at any level through the supply chain. The qualification is comprehensive, and provides an opportunity to study the principles of packaging, packaging materials and packaging processes.”

Diploma in Packaging Technology students come from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines, and are typically experienced practitioners or managers in technical, sales/marketing, QA, purchasing, engineering or design.

Completion of the Diploma in Packaging Technology demonstrates a commitment to your career and to the industry. Delegates who successfully complete the Diploma are equipping themselves for senior positions within the packaging industry.

Entries are now open with submissions closing on the 23rd of February 2018. The winner of the inaugural Packaging Council of New Zealand Scholarship will be announced at the 2018 Packaging & Processing Innovation & Design Awards; which will be held alongside of the prestigious international WorldStar Packaging Awards on 2 May.

Internships land for Master of Food and Packaging Innovation program

The University of Melbourne and the Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) are offering businesses the opportunity to engage students from the Master of Food and Packaging Innovation (MFPI) for an industry internship in 2018.

The MFPI is a unique post-graduate degree, training students to be well rounded professionals in the area of NPD as well as food packaging processes and design.

“Taking an MFPI intern provides an ideal opportunity to assess your potential future employees,” said Nerida Kelton, MAIP executive officer.

“Students from the Master of Food Packaging and Innovation have the knowledge, skills, drive and enthusiasm to be highly successful employees, and potentially future leaders, in the food and food packaging industries.”

Hosting an intern supports industry development and the future leaders of the food and food packaging sectors. MFPI students are required to undertake 120 to 200 hours of work as part of their internship.

These hours can be taken over weeks or months, depending on the needs of the company.

Parties who are interested in taking an intern in 2018 can email info@aipack.com.au for more information.