New extrusion mill for Ridley Corporation

Ridley Corporation continues its path upstream, with the announcement that Wiley will take on the responsibility of design build partner and principal contractor for its new extrusion mill project in Westbury, Tasmania.

The new state of the art, purpose built mill, will have an annualised capacity of up to 50,000 tonnes per annum, on-site bulk storage capacity and fit for purpose warehouses for both raw materials and finished goods. The Extrusion Mill will manufacture and supply feed primarily to the salmon industry, as well as other aquaculture species in Australia and in New Zealand.

Wiley have been engaged by Ridley to design and construct the Extrusion Mill and the duo have been working together on the design of the facility over the past year. Following the recent Development Approval for the project, the collaboration will continue through the construction phase on to a fully operational facility.

“We are proud to collaborate with Ridley on this fantastic project. It’s great to work with a company that shares similar values to our own. Our commitment to Ridley and the broader aquaculture industry is to deliver value at every stage of this project and unlock a new level of commercial possibilities for the industry in doing so,” said Wiley Innovation and Strategy Director, Brandon Miller.

The new extrusion mill will add to Ridley’s already strong position as the market leading producer of high quality animal nutrition solutions. This modern processing facility will incorporate the latest technologies from around the world and provides the industry with a wide range of benefits. These include a greater capacity in shorter lead times and the ability to collaborate more closely on new product development and dietary enhancements.

“We’ve been a part of what is going into the design and engineering of this project and it is truly world class. It’s due for completion in 2019 and it is now our job to bring it to life,” said Miller.

Wiley awarded Bundaberg sugar terminal roofs upgrade project

STL, the owner of the State’s Bulk Sugar Terminals (BSTs) and its operator, Queensland Sugar Limited (QSL Operations), have announced that Wiley has been awarded the project to deliver their roof replacement project in Bundaberg. The project involves the roof replacement and recladding of galbestos on two existing bulk sugar terminals, spanning over 30,000m², which will remain in operation during construction.

This project is part of a larger scope of works by STL, to replace roof cladding containing asbestos on twelve sugar storage sheds over a period of eleven years. This particular project is to be staged over 18 months and requires a high degree of coordination to ensure that the BST’s operations are not impacted by construction.

Works onsite in Bundaberg will begin next month. Stage one will take approximately six months to complete before a six month break to meet the sugar industries storage requirements and avoid works during the cyclone season. The final stage will follow with another six months to completion. Construction completion dates are critical to ensuring smooth operations are maintained.

“We are looking forward to collaborating with STL, QSL Operations and Ranbury to deliver this project. Wiley has secured this project based on our superior construction and safety methodology. It is a significant investment by STL into the facility to ensure the future of its operations as well as huge contribution to the sugar industry in Bundaberg,” said Simon Spittle, Wiley’s Business Operations Director.

In addition to the roof refurbishment, structural strengthening works are being undertaken to the roof purlins, trusses, end walls and roller doors. Apex walkways are also being refurbished, replaced or added, depending on the existing arrangement and condition. The works involve a combination of high-risk activities such as asbestos removal, and working at heights, on a 34° pitch roof.

Preparation key to building success for food making facilities

When pie manufacturer Baked Provisions wanted to design a new facility in Western Sydney, it had to make sure that not only was the budget met, but it would have a building that would meet its operational needs and capital constraints. Luckily, Total Construction was able to meet both these requirements.

When building a new facility, a food manufacturer knows that such a capital investment of a bespoke building can be a costly affair. Baked Provisions knew this, so they knew they needed a company that would not only build a quality facility to its specifications, but would do so within its budget.

Total Construction is a company that specialises in building commercial facilities that are designed to give clients the best value for money, and to make sure that the finished product meets the operational needs of a busy, modern enterprise.

Total knows the key to a successful project is to make sure the client involves a builder early on in the process.

Baked Provisions’ management team embraced this strategy and it wasn’t long before the company started helping the Prestons-based bakery conceptualise and design the project from the ground up.

Early Contractor Involvement

“Commonly known in the construction game as Early Contractor Involvement (ECI), having a builder involved during the scoping and design stage can allow critical cost items in any build/ fit out be identified and alternatives discussed,” Total Construction’s national business manager Rob Blythman told Food & Beverage Industry News.

“For instance, you may have a plan to construct a mezzanine level in your operations. Although perfect for the intended process flows, it can be extremely costly to construct.”

Blythman pointed out that sometimes clients cannot see the forest for the trees. They are so entrenched in their business they only see one aspect of the project, such as increasing efficiencies in their production.

“Involving a builder with process engineering capability in the food and beverage industry, such as Total Construction, can allow different eyes to see the requirements and suggest alternatives to the building layout that just don’t reduce the need for costly building works, but can potentially improve the process flow overall,” he said.

How does ECI work to help companies like Baked Provisions meet their budget?

The first step is a site visit, or investigation, which is carried out by the builder. This is similar to scoping a site. Total Construction looked at the existing site and the blueprint of the new facility. This allowed it to see all the services Baked Provisions would need in order to have an efficient operation.

The company also took stock of what utility services were available at the site. The Western Sydney industrial estate where the facility is located was fairly new so it was important to make sufficient services were available (i.e.. gas and electrical capacities). This is something that some businesses forget to do. Not only do you have to make sure the services are available, but increasing power or gas supply to a site can be very costly to the project and create delays.

Another area that needs consideration in the case of an existing building to be fitted out, is the structure integrity. Having to strengthen this to cope with the additional weight of fit out and services can often blow out project costs.

Getting stakeholders together

“A workshop was carried out with all stakeholders to identify required efficiencies, confirm proposed outputs and flag any potential limitations,” said Blythman. “As part of this workshop all production processes were mapped and detailed for both the existing and proposed operations. A comprehensive list including capacities and dimensions of all equipment both existing and new was developed. This helped to identify all utility services required and set the benchmark for power and gas requirements at the proposed site.”

One of the main reasons for being so comprehensive in the planning stage is, again, to save money for the client. It helps identify potential bottle necks in current processes and highlights any hygiene requirements in the new fit out, something that is a key ingredient in the food and beverage industry. Getting all this data captured was critical in maximising efficiencies of the new facility.

Once all these things were scoped, the Total Construction team got to work on the practicalities of the build for Baked Provisions.

“A review of the build-ability of the facility was done and sketch design layouts were completed to optimise process flows to best fit the client’s objectives,” said Blythman.

“A building/fit out SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis was carried out and build/ fit out costs were derived. Through consultation between ourselves and the client this process allowed savings to be identified early on in the overall design and layout of the facility.”

When Blythman talks about a detailed design, this includes all the services and other requirements, which is then put to the market for live market costing. This was so the client could get a firm understanding of what they could get for their dollar. It was at this point that the building of the facility was finalised.

“Here is where working to a budget comes in,” said Blythman. “Once the ideal building and fit out costs are established, it is then possible to derive further reductions in the overall project spend through rationalising the design. This included, but was not limited, to reducing the number and sizes of rooms, freezer/cool room capacities and locations, and finishes in the design.”

He said that this could be done while keeping future expansion capability intact in the design and maintaining the client’s required production output for their new facility.
Total Construction knew that a key to the success of the build was making sure it met Baked Provisions’ needs, as well as giving them the best advice during all stages of the project.

The new facility will make Baked Provisions' range of pies, savoury items and cakes.
The new facility will make Baked Provisions’ range of pies, savoury items and cakes.