Manufacturer can offer bespoke solutions for food industry

For more than 40 years, Victorian-based Enmin has been building custom vibratory and material handling solutions for a myriad of applications and environments.

The company’s knowledge and expertise in this area has seen their list of customers grow to include most of Australia’s leading food industry manufacturers.

Enmin’s range of product handling and vibratory equipment includes the Mi-CON modular conveyor – a hygienically designed full wash-down system to offer multiple standardised components – plus a range of hopper feeders and screeners, spiral conveyors, conditioning conveyors and more.

“All our products are designed and constructed first and foremost to meet the rigorous requirements of the food and pharmaceutical industries such as maximum hygiene, ease of cleaning and the reliability essential to meet the demands of continuous 24/7 operation,” said Enmin general manager, Anthony Gallaher.

Over the years, the company has earned an enviable reputation for designing and building equipment to the highest standards using the finest materials  to provide complete reliability and longevity.

Supporting other local manufacturers is a priority for Enmin and the company currently purchases 304 stainless steel, various steel and plastic machined parts, castings, coils and electrical components as well as outsourcing their laser cutting, all domestically.

Gallaher sees several benefits to customers of purchasing Enmin’s locally made equipment. These include the ability to offer individual design and customisation, expert local advice, consistency of supply and outstanding back-up and support.

In many cases Enmin is the only Australian company manufacturing specific material handling components.“We are the only company manufacturing electromagnetic drives in Australia and our many years in application experience will ensure the right drive is nominated for the tray requirements and process,” he said.

“Our equipment is designed to provide years of trouble-free operation with minimal moving parts, next to no on-going maintenance and, best of all, low energy consumption. All this ensures a reliable, low-cost method of product handling,” said Gallaher.

“Customisation is an important part of our business; depending on a customer’s requirement we can recommend either standard equipment components or design bespoke equipment,” Mr Gallaher added.

“A recent example was a requirement for a hopper feeder where the depositing system dictated a height that would be unergonomic for the production line staff to easily and safely access the storage hopper. Using our design expertise and state-of-the-art software, we designed a mobile unit with retractable operator steps. When not required, these steps can be folded out of the way quickly and with very little effort thanks to pressurised struts on each side,” Gallaher said.

“Another benefit of being a local manufacturer is being able to see first-hand a customer’s existing production line set-up to ensure our equipment will integrate seamlessly with other components already in place. We can ensure that mechanical components fit with minimal or no modifications and electrical interfaces are all talking to each other,” Gallaher said.

“There are many pieces of non-branded equipment brought in from overseas and these often need replacement parts; this is where our knowledge and expertise also comes into play to ensure that the right part is specified,” Gallaher went on to say.

“And of course, being a local manufacturer means we are only a quick phone call away to immediately respond to any customer query or provide service and parts support throughout Australia,” he added.

Enmin also invests heavily in R&D to provide Australian manufacturers with the latest developments in materials handling solutions and improve production efficiencies.

An example of this is Enmin’s design and development of a range of modular components. “The key benefit of modular components is that it eliminates equipment redundancy and expands with the customer’s business. It can be added to, extended and modified in the years ahead as a company’s production needs evolve,” said Gallaher.

“Whilst lower cost equipment from overseas may initially seem an attractive proposition, it is ultimately false economy. In the long term delivery turnaround, the ability to work closely with us during every phase of the project combined with the quality, reliability and opportunity to easily add to or modify years later as production needs change, far outweighs any price difference. In terms of return on investment, there is simply no comparison,” said Gallaher.

Enmin also has a range of Industrial vibrators to suit any industry that handles bulk material. The range is designed to suit Australia’s environment and covers a multitude of applications such as mining, quarrying and agriculture.

Research shows younger generations care about free-from foods and small portions

Free-from claims and smaller, more convenient pack sizes are important to younger consumers, research from a 2017 Nielsen report suggests.

At the iba baking and snack trade fair, a panel of experts from the baked goods sector spoke about the importance of moving towards free-from and organic products.

The forum, which took place on the 18th of September, showed a strong need for food manufacturers to cater to an increasing desire for clean products.

The information based on a Nielsen research report from 2017, on the US market, showed that organic sales among households with a millennial head of house, were 38 per cent greater than sales among total US households.

READ: Industry 4.0 a hot topic at iba Munich baking and snack trade fair

Robb MacKie, CEO of the American Bakers Association, said despite the data being from the US market, the association’s European counterpart found similarities in the data.

“The connections between the US and the international market are very strong.

“We are seeing health and wellness claims are the fastest growing areas for sales on the retail level in the US market,” said MacKie.

There is a big trend in free-from claims, he said.

“A lot of the soy-free and some of the others are growing at a very fast rate.

“The younger consumers are gravitating the most to those health claims,” said MacKie.

“The greatest generation, which is considered to be the World War 2 generation, is not really being impacted by some of these health claims. In baby boomers you start to see some movement,” he said.

But despite people being drawn to health claims, MacKie said cream filled pies, speciality desserts and muffins are on the rise in the US market.

“Taste is still King,” he said.

The key to the success is being healthier, but still having a tasty product on offer, he said.

Corbion vice president Mark Hotze agreed that consumers still have a need for food that tastes good.

“For us to be successful as an ingredient supplier, it’s really that willingness to roll up our sleeves, partner with our customers and understand where they want to go in that space.”

The consumers need to know an item is worth the calories, said Hotze.

Brian Dwyer, vice president of bakery manufacturing at Kroger, said the supermarket chain noticed people going for smaller portions.

“The one trend that I would say I’ve seen with indulgent food is the move to smaller pack sizes. Whereas in the past our consumers would pick up a 12 inch or and 8 inch pie, we are seeing that move to a smaller size, maybe a 5 inch pie,” said Dwyer.

“What we are seeing is there’s a need for indulgent, but our consumers want to eat that and have that indulgent experience without feeling guilty.

“The health and wellness is clearly a rapidly growing segment. We are seeing a lot of activity and a lot of energy around the health and wellness sector,” he said.

Kroger’s Simple Truth and Simple Truth organic brands have been the company’s  fastest growing brand ever, said Dwyer.

Research from Nielsen shows the dollar growth of grain free products in the bakery section has increased by 51 per cent from 2017.

Cruelty-free products have increased in US dollar growth by 30 per cent, and grass fed products have in increased by 28 per cent from 2017.

Workshops across Australia aim to help growers with pest and disease management

A series of free workshops to be held across Australia in August and September will give growers help with pest and disease management.

They will have the opportunity to hear from leading entomologists on how they can use integrated pest and disease management to help maintain orchard health and viability.

The nine workshops will focus on pests and diseases affecting local orchards in each state, including control measures and chemical interactions.

The workshops form part of a pest, disease and weed management program for the Australian apple and pear industry, which is a levy-funded project delivered under the management of Agriculture Victoria entomologist, David Williams.

READ: Hybrid mega-pest threatening global food crops

Williams is recognised nationally and internationally for expertise in integrated pest and disease management development and adoption.

Williams will be the key speaker at the nine workshops being held around Australia in August and September.

He will be joined by Australian experts and fellow entomologist, Christopher Adams, from Michigan State University.

The free workshops start on the 21st of August in Tatura, Victoria and on the 22nd of August in Bundoora.

There will also be workshops in Tasmania, SA, WA, NSW and Queensland.

Orchardists will hear case studies of successful initiatives and be guided through a process of developing their individual integrated pest and disease management plans for the coming season.

Participants will also have an opportunity to identify a local pest or disease management issue for further study.

The workshops are part of a project funded by Hort Innovation using the Apple and Pear research and development levy and funds from the Australian Government.

The Victorian Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources is delivering the project in collaboration with Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, NSW Department of Primary Industries, Western Australia Primary Industries and Regional Development, Tasmania’s Institute of Agriculture; and Lenswood Cooperative.

Melbourne food trade expo attracts a dozen producers from NSW

The Fine Food Australia trade expo in Melbourne in September attracts thousands of producers, including gourmet producers from NSW.

Prodcuers come from places small and large, including Sydney, Snowy Mountains and Illawarra-Shoalhaven.

NSW government minister for trade and industry Niall Blair said the “Flavours of NSW” stand at the event will feature stunning gourmet food and niche beverages from locations such as Riverina-Murray, Central Coast and Hunter.

“Fine Food Australia is our annual olympics for food, bringing together 1,000 plus exhibitors from over 60 countries to compete for the attention of more than 20,000 food industry buyers and importers,” he said.

READ: A taste of NSW at Fine Food Australia

“The event gives NSW food and beverage producers a chance to market their brands to a who’s who of the industry and sell their products to the nation and the world. This year’s event is in Melbourne and we’ve assembled a diverse list of our best and most innovative producers to showcase what we’re made of here in NSW,” said Blair.

“Our products will include mouth-watering artisan cheeses, gourmet coffee, native bush food, award winning condiments, sugar free chocolate, seaweed infused creations, and niche beverages including craft ginger beer and Snowy Mountains schnapps,” he said.

Fine Food Australia, to be held from 10-13 September, is a trade-only event targeted at professionals working in the foodservice, hospitality and retail industries.

NSW has more than 50,000 agricultural, aquaculture, fishing and food and beverage processing companies that contribute to a food and agriculture export industry worth more than $7 billion a year.

Fine Food Australia will also allow the NSW exhibitors to learn from industry leaders about the latest industry trends, and for restauranteurs to source the best and newest NSW products for their menus to keep diners walking through the door.

Exhibitors from NSW include Blushing Blueberries of Macksville, Julianne’s Kitchen from Hornsby, Little Creek Cheese from Wyong, and White Horse Coffee from Sutherland.

Consumers know best – the key to making new products flourish

Why do products such as Cadbury Marvellous Creations’ popping candy chocolate and Chobani’s high-protein Greek yoghurt succeed, when others fall short of the mark?

Because the people behind these products listen to consumers and offer the best packaging to get people grabbing for their products.

Food innovation expert Angeline Achariya explains that companies often forget to find out what consumers want, which leads to products failing before they even hit a high.

“Take a consumer inspired approach. Understand the market, understand the consumer,” she said.

READ: Food companies can learn from start-ups, Practical Innovation says

“In FMCG (fast-moving consumer goods), 90 per cent of products fail in the first 12 months of product launch,” said Achariya.

Perhaps with better consumer knowledge and packaging this wouldn’t be the case.

In a presentation hosted by St.George Bank, in Sydney in July, Achariya talked about “finding the next UBER in food”.

Food producers and manufacturers gained valuable advice on how to introduce new products to the market that will bring consumers back for more.

Achariya is the chief executive officer at Monash University’s food innovation centre. She and her team helped Chobani succeed in the Australian dairy retail sector, and she recalls Mondelez buying “all of the popping candy in the world” for its Cadbury Marvellous Creations range.

Cadbury listened to consumers. People liked the chocolate melting on their tongues to reveal textured candy with a satisfying crunch. They liked the crackling on the roofs of their mouths, which reminded them of their childhood, said Achariya.

“The most successful things in the market place are always meeting a need. It’s really about making sure that consumers want it.”

During the innovation cycle process, focusing on packaging first was necessary, said Achariya.

When it comes to launching new products, it’s what’s in the outside that counts at first glance.

“Consumers eat with their eyes first,” said Achariya.

Beak & Johnston founder David Beak agreed that good market research, and the right packing, helped the success of a product.

Beak’s company is a family owned food processing business with 30 years’ experience dealing in fresh cut and value added meat products, fresh soups, sauces and prepared meals.

It wasn’t always smooth sailing for the company, which brought products, such as fresh ready meals, out a decade too soon, Beak said.

“A lot of the ideas we had 25-30 years ago were 15 years or 20 years too early. It comes back to doing market research,” he said.

Although it could be daunting to launch a new product, it was all about perseverance, Beak said. “Don’t give up.”

St.George relationship director Mark Burgess said the event was about supporting businesses in the food and beverage industry.

“We love bringing our customers together to showcase different perspectives and trends in the industry.”

Learning more about consumers’ needs and wants, and making sure this is reflected in packaging, could help a new product succeed.

These steps may seem simple, but speakers at the event, Achariya and Beak, highlighted them as they can get lost in a large list of ‘must-do’ tasks.

 

Expansion and government funding recipe for success at Geelong Bakery

 The government of Victoria is helping a family owned bakery in Geelong expand its operations and create new jobs in the area.

The Routley’s Bakery in North Geelong received a $187,500 grant from the government through its local industry fund for transition.

The bakery is undergoing a $2.2 million expansion.

Money from the grant has gone towards renovating the current production site, purchasing new food manufacturing equipment and towards taking on six new workers – with more new jobs to be created.

READ: Victoria’s wine industry gets a $2 million boost from the government

Established 70 years ago, the company makes pies, cakes and bread for clients within the retail, education, health and aged care, leisure, transport and logistics, defence and government sectors.

Member for Geelong, Christine Couzens, said supporting companies such as Routley’s Bakery was important in employing more people in the community and supporting the local economy.

Routley’s Bakery has also been in touch with The Gordon’s Skills and Jobs Centre to recruit staff, including those from the automotive industry.

Minister for industry and employment, Ben Carroll, said the government would always support companies that help boost productivity and create new jobs.

“[The] government will support local businesses so they continue to grow and innovate – which will allow them to employ more Victorians.”

Victorian manufacturing contributes $27.7 billion to the Victorian economy and is home to more than 13,000 businesses employing more than 286,000 people.

The Victorian government has provided more than $120m in manufacturing support, creating more than 6,000 jobs and driving more than $1.6b in private investment.

The local industry fund for transition helps businesses generate new investment and create jobs for retrenched workers in areas affected by closures elsewhere.

The fund has supported more than 40 projects – expected to create more than 1,200 new jobs, more than 1,000 of which are suitable for ex auto workers.

Nestlé sells off confectionery brands in New Zealand

Nestlé is selling off toffees, licorice and other confectionery in New Zealand.

The company is saying goodbye to lollies, but it’s staying in the business of producing chocolate and baking goods for the New Zealand market.

RJ’s in New Zealand will purchase the Mackintosh’s, Heards, Oddfellows, Black Knight and Fabulicious Red Licorice brands from Nestlé.

The completion of the sale is expected to happen on the 31st of August.

READ: Nestlé joins Global Coalition to advance animal welfare standards

Where possible, RJ’s intends to continue the manufacture of these brands in New Zealand, with plans to be finalised in the coming weeks.

Nestlé will also sell the Life Savers brand to Darrell Lea in Australia.

The sale of these brands will result in up to 55 redundancies from Wiri factory, but RJ’s is helping to identify opportunities for redundant workers.

Earlier in July, Nestlé announced it was committed to using certified sustainable palm oil in all its products by 2023.

Nestlé’s global head of responsible sourcing Benjamin Ware said transparency in Nestlé’s supply chain had always been a priority.

“Nestlé has always been committed to implementing responsible sourcing and has made significant progress towards our commitment to using fully responsibly sourced palm oil,” he said.

“Nestlé supports RSPO’s role in driving industry wide change and appreciates its decision following the submission of our action plan, which focuses on increasing traceability primarily through segregated RSPO palm oil,” said Ware.

The Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil reinstated Nestlé’s membership following its time-bound action plan to achieve 100 per cent RSPO certified sustainable palm oil.

 

Rabobank appoints new group executive with extensive knowledge of food and agribusiness sector

Rabobank Australia and New Zealand has appointed Karin van Selm as group executive for wholesale banking.

In her current role, as the bank’s general manager of corporate banking, van Selm provides for the increasingly complex requirements of Rabobank’s large corporate clients operating in the food and agribusiness sector.

She’s worked in her current role with Rabobank since January 2016.

Rabobank Australia and New Zealand managing director Peter Knoblanche said van Selm was ideally placed to take on the position of group executive to ensure a seamless continuation of the expansion and development of Rabobank’s wholesale banking operation.

READ: Shift in rankings of companies listed in Rabobank Global Dairy Top 20

“Karin has extensive experience and exceptional understanding of the corporate banking needs of major companies involved in the food and agricultural sector,” said Knoblanche.

Rabobank is one of Australia’s largest agricultural banks and a major provider of specialist corporate financial services to the region’s food and agribusiness sector.

Van Selm worked in structured finance at ING Barings, before moving to Australia in 2005, from the Netherlands.

She then joined Westpac, where she worked in various roles in the banking consumer and agribusiness team.

She holds a Master of Laws, specialising in international tax and economics.

Van Selm said the future opportunities for Australia and New Zealand’s corporate food and agribusiness were exciting, with both countries producing world-class agricultural produce and with rapidly-growing export markets.

“That said, businesses in the F&A sector are challenged to remain competitive in the various commodity markets, faced with increasing costs of labour, water, energy and insurance, as well as stricter regulatory environments,” she said.

“Rabobank, with its both global and local reach in food and agriculture, and its deep understanding of the various segments of the agri market, is well positioned to enable, facilitate and connect our clients in the value chain and support them with their growth ambitions,” said van Selm.

She will start the new role on the 1st of August, taking over from Els Kamphof, who has been appointed to head the regional wholesale banking operations in the Netherlands and Africa.

 

Heat and Control, and Ishida, open their doors to industry people

With a combined 200 years of experience in the snacks industry, Heat and Control, and Ishida open their doors to industry people.

The companies demonstrated their complete solutions in a snacks food production Open House event at the Ishida factory facility in Birmingham, UK.

About 100 snack food producers visited the demonstration centre during a three-week period in June, 2018.

The event provided snack food producers the opportunity to see the equipment in action and to participate in a series of information and training sessions.

READ: Ishida and Heat and Control announce enhanced co-operation

Packaging & Inspection Systems business manager Robert Marguccio, said the event was a great way for customers to interact with snack food experts from both Heat and Control and Ishida.

“Given the automation benefits of Industry 4.0, engaging with a single source supplier like [Heat and Control] Snack Solutions can add value through increased connectivity levels and digital data exchange, along all stages of the processing and packaging production lines,” said Marguccio.

Working with one supplier was a far easier and cost effective process, as customers only needed to speak to one team, he said.

Snack food producers were able to see demonstrations of product moving through key sections of the processing and packaging lines.

One example was potato chips moving from a switchback conveyor into an incline conveyor, which can move product vertically to where it’s needed, while reducing drop damage.

After reaching the top of the incline conveyor, the potato chips are transported down the line through Heat and Control’s fastback revolution proportional gate.

The gate eliminates product breakage during gate closure and provides an accurate feed of product to weigher via the fastback Left Right Center (LRC).

The LRC is a double multihead weigher feed solution designed to provide a precise and consistent product stream to Ishida’s patented back-to-back 218 twin weigher.

The product then moves from the weighers into twin or single snack food bagmakers.

For quality control, Ishida checkweighers will verify correct product weight or count, eliminate underweights, and protect profits by eliminating costly product overweight giveaway.

The snack product is then packed using the ACP-700 case packer, which can be integrated into any snacks production line.

Automation of the line is controlled using Heat and Control, and Ishida’s data solutions technology, which enables operators to fully oversee the production line and provide real time feedback to the operator.

The companies came together to form a strategic alliance that provides snack customers with full end-to-end processing and packaging solutions.

In Australia, New Zealand and the USA, Heat and Control is the exclusive distributor of Ishida packaging and inspection technology.

In India, Heat and Control is the exclusive distributor for snack food packaging.

Dick Smith Foods will be closing down over the next 12 months

After 19 years, Dick Smith Foods is closing, as sales were already on a downward spiral in 2010.

Owner, Dick Smith, said sales had continued to drop until about 2010.

“At that stage, I was considering closing the business down. However, everyone came out with incredible support and I put in a lot of extra time in trying to revitalise the brand,” he said.

“As you can see, we had a small blip in sales, but then once we stopped selling our products at cost or less than cost, the sales started dropping again,” said Smith.

READ: Dick Smith wins fight to keep Ozemite on shelfs

Dick Smith Foods will be closing down over the next 12 months.

The company’s products include cereals, peanut butter, jam and tomato sauce.

Smith thanked people for supporting the brand.

“Our suppliers are going to keep our products on the shelves as long as they can, so please look for them and try to support them.”

Smith was also the owner of retailer Dick Smith Electronics, which he founded in 1968.

Woolworths took over the electronics chain in 1982.

Mindfulness is a key factor in people’s food choices for 2018

Mindfulness and individual choice are at the forefront of people’s minds when it comes to food choices in 2018.

Although these are not new trends, they are ongoing factors that continue to shape the consumer food market.

Consumers are developing a more holistic way of questioning what they eat.

Rather than random selection, they’re looking to connect with a brand’s values – be it health and wellness benefits, a social conscience, or enhanced nutrition.

READ: The top six food trends for 2018 – a manufacturer’s guide

Consumer packaged goods companies must become more innovative and relevant to meet consumer needs.

This pushes companies to run incubator programs for product innovation and experiment with creative technology in stores to keep consumers satisfied.

Studies conducted by Haines Consulting Group show that consumers are increasingly mindful in their food choices. It is the main driver to consumer behaviour in the food industry.

Modern consumers want to know what is in their food and how it was sourced, so they can make better decisions about their health and how the product impacts the environment and the community.

This behavioural shift means that brands must advertise and create an environment that empowers consumers through convenience, health and choice.

The technology and tools available to consumers mean they have more insight into their personal health than ever before.

Knowing how many steps they’ve taken, calories they’ve burnt, or how much sleep they’ve had, can play a big role in people’s food choices.

For brands, messaging is key, to help consumers make the desired choice for their health.

Consumers are becoming more educated on nutrition and food quality, as they want to make responsible food decisions.

Food is becoming less of a commodity and more of an individual choice.

Preferences need to be catered for and shopping needs to feel relevant and personal.

But, it’s a fine line to find the balance of enough options to overwhelming choice.

The ability to personalise is essential, but people don’t want to be confronted with too many choices.

Brands also need to effectively communicate food messages about nutrition and health.

Another trends that isn’t new, but is proving important to consumers, is fitting products into people’s busy lifestyles.

Products need to be conveniently packaged and marketed to tick the convenience box for consumers.

This trend is evident in the uptake and increase in food delivery services and meal packages, blurring the line between restaurants and supermarkets.

E-commerce is set for huge growth with fast ordering and delivery services, meaning shoppers can get everything they need quickly and easily.

Understanding all of these consumer trends can help business increase engagement and ultimately increase brand sales and success, Haines Consulting Group explains.

 

 

Food companies can learn from start-ups, Practical Innovation says

Practical Innovation helps food companies develop innovative products, with similar ideas to those used by start-up companies.

The aim is to get companies, stuck in their old ways, to take more risks that will benefit them long-term.

Practical Innovation pushes companies to break the old paradigm of marketing the same products on a reduced margin, which can set the product up for eventual failure.

Practical Innovation CEO Tal Leizer said gambling a company’s reputation in the market with a new product that might not survive on-shelf was a huge impediment.

“If you want to succeed in the competitive food market, the very first step is to take failure off the table and start thinking audaciously, like a start-up.”

There is a huge gap between start-ups that launch innovative products and traditional companies that don’t, irrespective of company scale.

Using the multidisciplinary expertise of professional innovators is necessary to drive the changes required and to launch win-win products.

Many established food companies want to develop new products and increase sales and revenues, but to do so involves harnessing tremendous efforts and resources that are not always available to traditional companies such as bakeries and sweetener companies.

Starting an innovation process in an existing company that has produced the same products over many years comes with challenges.

With so much at risk, older, and larger, companies often only make minor changes rather than introducing new ideas.

Being inherently risk-averse, they might only add a new flavour, improve packaging, or simply cut costs.

Leizer shares a few tips on how to revive a company’s innovation process, which include searching for creative ideas, even if those ideas seem impossible.

Identifying important food trends, and knowing what the market wanted, now and five years from now, was also important, he said.

Company’s also had to make the concept feasible and scalable, said Leizer.

 

Survey shows ALDI is the most trusted brand in Australia

A recent survey has bumped ALDI up the food chain as the most trusted supermarket brand in Australia.

In the latest Roy Morgan Net Trust Score survey, ALDI is ahead of big names such as Qantas and Bunnings.

The supermarket brand went from third place to first, in the July survey results.

About 4,000 Australian were asked which brands they trusted and distrusted. The previous survey was conducted in April 2018.

READ: ALDI to sell Australian-supplied products in China 

Conducted by Roy Morgan, the latest survey reveals ALDI has come in just ahead of insurer NRMA with Bendigo Bank, Qantas and Bunnings.

Qantas has fell from its number-one spot as Australia’s most trusted brand, to fourth position.

ALDI’s main supermarket rivals, Woolworths and Coles, are rated highly when considering trust but fell behind ALDI on net trust score.

Despite ALDI’s strong performance with the top net trust score of any brand, supermarkets as a category fall behind other industries such as automotive, consumer product brands, travel, and technology.

According to Roy Morgan CEO Michele Levine, the importance of trust to a brand’s sustainable future is increasingly recognised as a key metric.

“Nowhere is a high level of trust more important than when it comes to the provision of the food we eat,” said Levine.

“The success of ALDI’s entrance to the Australian market has been built not only on discount prices but also a reputation for reliability and meeting the needs of consumers. ALDI’s ability to excel at its core competencies has built a level of trust in the Australian market without at the same time attracting the degree of distrust seen by its rivals,” she said.

“Measuring trust alone is never enough – we need to measure distrust and then subtract if from trust to reveal the accurate health of a brand. Although ALDI’s larger rivals both have high levels of trust, it is the number of Australians who express distrust in the two market leaders that they should be worried about,” said Levine.

The top brands in Australia ranked by the positive net trust score are:

  • ALDI
  • NRMA
  • Bendigo Bank
  • Qantas
  • Bunnings
  • Kmart
  • ABC Network
  • IGA
  • Australian Post
  • ING

Roy Morgan indicated that important drivers of trust include reliability, customer focus, knowledgeable staff, ease of contact and previous good experiences with the company.

Drivers of brand distrust revolve around perceptions of self-centredness, greed, and dishonest and deceitful business practices.

Food and Beverage Awards Industry finalists announced

From fruity drinks to coconut yoghurt, the finalists for the Food and Beverage Industry Awards 2018 shows the broad range of companies making their mark on the food industry.

The prestigious awards program recognises successful and innovative people in the industry, including brands that have a focus on health, and companies that are committed to providing equipment and services that focus on safety-first.

All finalists are automatically entered for the ‘Best of the Best’ award, sponsored by Flavour Makers.

Beverage of the Year – Sponsored by VEGA Australia

UTONIC – UTONIC Repair

The Good Seed Kefir – Kefir Soda, fermented beverage

Chai Addict – Chai Addict and Chai Harder

Emma and Tom’s – Colour Cleanse Purple Recovery

PepsiCo ANZ – Pepsi Max Vanilla

Ingredient Innovation

Raglan Coconut Yoghurt – Coconut yoghurt range

Fermentanicals – Organic sprouted grain line

Golden Grind – Golden Grind full range

Botanical Innovations – Apple cider vinegar

Chr. Hansen – SafePro

Morlife – Hemp falafel mix

Food Safety Equipment and Materials

Mitrefinch Australia – Time and attendance access and fatigue management

SICK – Bottle cap detection

ACO – Hygienic drainage systems

CCP Technologies – CCP Network Australia

Packaging Innovation – Sponsored by Jet Technologies

Result Group – Grape n’ Go

PakWorld – Pic’s Peanut Butter Slugs

The Low Carb Living Group – Protein Bread Co baking mixes

Chai Addict – Chai Addict and Chai Harder

Innovative Technology of the Year – Sponsored by NHP

Mitrefinch Australia – Mobile time and attendance live reporting

Aerofloat – DAF and MBBR

Automaint Solutions – HSC Lidding Attachment

HMPS – HMPS8000 Robotic Flat Bread Packer

JCurve Solutions – JCurve ERP

SICK – Bottle cap detection

Health Foods – Sponsored by JCurve Solutions

Well and Good – Hamburger buns

Nuts By Nature Mylk – Almond Mylk base

Extraordinary Foods – Pure kale chips

The Low Carb Living Group – Plant based range

COYO – COYO kids’ pouches

Mr Lee’s Pure Foods – Mr Lee’s noodles

Best in Design – Sponsored by Wiley

The Low Carb Living Group

Monash university – Incubation facility

Victorian Government and La Trobe University – AgriBio

Oji Fibre Solutions – Yatala packaging plant

Meat, Poultry and Smallgoods

Country Cooked Meats – The Standard Meat Co char siu pork

Hazeldene’s Chicken Farm – The Bare Bird

The Original Lamb Bacon Co. – Lamb bacon

Sunshine Meats – Smoked duck breast

Paddock to Plate

Prestige Foods Manufacturing – Chickpeas

Australian Primary Hemp – Hemp seeds and oil, hemp balance, hemp boost

The Original Lamb Bacon Co. – Lamb bacon

Fonterra – Anmum QR code

The Food & Beverage Industry Awards 2018 will be held at Dockside, Cockle Bay Wharf, Sydney on Thursday the 16th of August 2018.

Bega Cheese buys Western Australian dairy facility for $250m

Bega Cheese is expanding its reach by buying a Western Australian facility for $250 million.

The company is purchasing Saputo Dairy Australia’s Koroit facility, which currently processes about 300ML of dairy products per year.

Bega expects the facility to generate about $20m at its current intake per year.

Items produced include milk, retail butter and milk powders.

READ: Bega Cheese buys Vegemite

As part of the transaction, Bega and Saputo entered into agreements whereby Saputi is required to guarantee the supply of 300ML milk per year until June, 2020. The transaction is subject to ACCC approval.

Bega CEO Paul van Heerwaarden said the Koroit facitily would give Bega operational flexibility its other milk processing sites.

It would also provide the cheese company with a better presence in Western Victoria, said van Heerwaarden.

“The acquisition will support the continued growth of our core dairy business and provide domestic and export customers with an expanded range of products.

“We welcome the 108 employees of Koroit to Bega Cheese.”

Bega executive chairman Barry Irvin said it was a delight to have acquired the dairy facility.

“Bega Cheese has been collecting milk in Western Victoria for almost 1 years and the opportunity to acquire such significant and quality infrastructure will cement our presence in one of the strongest dairy regions in Australia.

“We will work closely with dairy farmers to grow supply to the Koroit Facility. This is another important step in creating an Australian owned dairy and food company that is competitive and efficient in Australia and the world.”

 

 

Australia’s top 100 food and beverage companies

IBISWorld has released its annual list of the Top 100 food and beverage companies in Australia. The list offers detailed insight into the largest companies in two of the nation’s most diverse subdivisions.

 
The largest 100 food and beverage companies in Australia generate in excess of $AUD100 billion in revenue (up from over $AUD96 billion in 2014-15) and employ more than 130,000 Australians. 
 
IBISWorld has identified key industry trends underpinning major company movements in 2015-16. 

These include:
·         Strong growth in food processing industries – particularly meat processing – driven by free trade agreements and increasing global demand for Australian produce.

·         Milk production in Australia has benefited from joint ventures and expansion of airfreighted fresh milk exports to growing Asian markets, particularly China.

·         The beer manufacturing industry has struggled as consumer tastes have shifted towards craft beer, and industry revenue is set to decline as alcohol consumption, particularly of traditional beer brands, continues to fall.

·         The wine production industry is moving towards recovery, following a wine glut that negatively affected the industry for the better part of the past decade.

The list also highlights:
·         Fonterra: remained number one on the list of top food and beverage companies by revenue generated.
·         Lion Nathan: remained number two on the list.
·         Coca-Cola Amatil: remained number three on the list.
·         Parmalat: jumped from number 27 last year to reach number 19 this year.
·         Green’s Foods: made it onto the top 100 list for the first time at number 87.
·         a2 Milk: made it onto the top 100 list for the first time at number 100.
·         Goodman Fielder: slipped 3 places to settle at number 11.
·         Mars: slipped 3 places to settle at number 22.
·         Bindaree Beef: moved from number 51 last year to reach 35 this year.
 
“The two newcomers to the list are Green’s Foods and a2 Milk. Green’s Foods has entered the list at rank 87, while a2 has entered at 100. Green’s Foods posted a surge in revenue of 72.6% over the year through December 2014. This was the result of the company’s acquisitions of Goodman Fielder’s and Waterwheel’s biscuit businesses in 2013. a2 Milk posted revenue growth of 40.2% over the year through June 2015, on the back of fresh milk exports to China and substantial sales growth in a2 Platinum Infant Formula across Australia and New Zealand,” said IBISWorld senior industry analyst Spencer Little.
 
“After purchasing the remaining 50% interest in the a2 Milk Company Limited joint venture and converting it to a fully owned subsidiary, a2 Milk began exporting fresh milk to China in August 2014. Sales of the company’s infant formula skyrocketed in 2014-15,” concluded Little.
 

ACCC working to ensure a successful Food and Grocery Code

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission has reassured the Australian Food and Grocery Council (AFGC) that it will do what it can to ensure the Council’s Code of Conduct succeeds.

At an industry forum held in Canberra, ACCC Chairman Rod Sims said that the Code can redress the imbalance in bargaining power existing between suppliers and large grocery suppliers.

According to Mr Sims, “Ensuring suppliers are aware of their rights is crucial to the success of the Code. Our public action was designed to help with this.”

Plans to increase focus on the agricultural sector were also outlined, with further discussions to be held concerning the proposed changes to the country of origin labelling regime and the role of regulators. 

KUKA extends Arctic sub zero range of palletising robots

KUKA Robotics Australia has extended its Arctic range of palletising
robots with the introduction of the new 700kg payload model. This extension
follows the re-release of the Arctic sub zero range of palletising robots in
the 120kg to 240kg category in 2014.

The new 700kg payload layer palletising robot in the Arctic range can
quickly and efficiently palletise full layers of ice cream, meat, fish or any
frozen products, and also comes with a huge 3,320mm reach and hollow gearbox
wrist for higher reliability.

KUKA has also extended the zero degree operation to its entire range as
standard, from the ultra-high speed 40kg capable of 56 cycles per minute, through
to the medium 120 to 240kg class, and now the 300, 470 and 700kg models, with
no change in price. The upper temperature range of 55°C remains the same.

KUKA’s palletising robots have been able to
achieve this new zero degree operation without the need for suits, heat bands
or other additional extras, enabling dairy producers to keep their product
below 4°C even while palletising to ensure food safety.