Steel belts for chocolate manufacturing solutions

Cooling and forming are critical stages in the production of both chocolate and confectionery, and few companies have more experience in these areas than Melbourne-based IPCO.

As an independent company owned by FAM AB, and part of the Swedish-based Wallenberg group, IPCO is a globally active engineering company with sales and service offices in more than 35 countries. As a business its connection with the food industry stretches back almost a century, when its steel belts were first used in bake ovens.

Milestones since then include their use for cooling chocolate drops at an American confectionery company in the 1930s, for ice-cream freezing (1959) and for chocolate conveying (1960). Today, IPCO steel belts are used in applications ranging from simple conveying to continuous processes such as cooling/solidification, conditioning, casting, freezing and finishing.

In parallel with this, IPCO has developed its own forming systems including the Rotoform FD – a food-grade pastillation system used to turn molten product, such as chocolate, fruit-flavoured jelly, gum base, fats and other additives, into solid, consistently sized pastilles.

Processing solution for industrial and decorative chocolate
This expertise in pastillation in general, and chocolate in particular, has seen the company create a specialist division focussed on chocolate processing.

With its own production facilities in Breda, The Netherlands, this division produces versatile forming systems for both industrial (chunks, chips and blocks) and decorative (rolls, shavings, blossoms etc.) chocolate products. These systems are designed to maximise productivity while also ensuring a premium quality end product.

The company has developed a portfolio that includes depositors, extruders, cutters and decorative forming systems, as well as high-performance, steel-belt conveyors and economical plastic belt systems. By combining these different elements, IPCO can offer process lines suitable for everything from low-cost, rapid-deployment start-ups to high-performance, multi-layer systems.

Rotoform rotary depositing chip production
At the heart of every IPCO high-speed, high-capacity chocolate forming system is the Rotoform rotary depositor, a unit first developed for the chemical industry but subsequently adapted for food processing. More than 2,000 Rotoform depositors are now used around the world.

The Rotoform itself consists of a heated cylindrical stator and perforated rotating shell that turns concentrically around the stator. Chocolate drops are deposited across the whole operating width of a continuously running cooling belt. The outer depositor shell can be replaced to enable the production of chips of a different size, with a changeover in less than 30 minutes.

The circumferential speed of the Rotoform is synchronised with the speed of the belt so drops are deposited without deformation. The heat of the drops is transferred to cooling air blown onto the product and also to the belt itself.

The most recent addition to this range is the Rotoform HP, a high-performance system offering a range of advantages including increased productivity, reduced maintenance and the ability to handle higher viscosity products. Reliable, versatile and easy to use, the Rotoform HP is available on all IPCO chocolate production lines, or as a retrofit replacement for piston depositors.

Suitable for the production of chips from 250-35,000 pcs/kg, this versatile module delivers a consistently sized product at depositing speeds of up to 40 m/min. Available in 800mm, 1,200mm and 1,500mm widths, the Rotoform HP can process viscosities up to 25,000 mPas.

Single- and triple-pass cooling lines
IPCO produces a range of cooling systems to meet different throughput requirements. Single-pass, end-to-end cooling lines are designed for low-to-medium capacity requirements from 200-2,000 kg/hr.

These affordable systems can incorporate a gear or rotary depositor for chip production and/or extruder and servo cutter for chunks. IPCO triple-pass cooling systems enable high throughput rates while minimising floor space requirements. The product is deposited on the first belt and adheres to the underside for the second pass. It is then removed on to a second conveyor for a third pass.

IPCO steel belts for confectionery processing
As well as producing complete process systems, IPCO is also a manufacturer of steel belts, supplying third-party machine builders (OEMs) throughout the food industry in general, and the confectionery industry in particular.

Steel belts are a versatile conveying medium. They are available in solid or perforated form and can be manufactured to virtually any length and, at IPCO’s manufacturing plant in Sweden, to widths from 25-9,000mm.

Steel belts offer a unique range of thermal properties, being capable of operating in temperatures from minus 80°C to +750°C. Cooling is an area in which IPCO has end-to-end process expertise, working with machine manufacturers to ensure optimum productivity and return on investment.

These systems are used for cooling and solidifying, with applications including chocolate, sugar mass, caramel, gelatine, hard-melt candy, nougat, nut brittle and more.

Steel belts are also used in zoned conditioning systems; slab and bar casting applications (e.g. caramel and sugar mass); freezer lines; drying units; chocolate melt reclamation; and in finishing operations (e.g. cutting, folding, layering).

In terms of cleanliness and hygienic food handling, the flat surface of a steel confectionery conveyor means there are no joints or crevices in which germs can hide. Its smoothness means a cleaner, easier discharge of lollies, chocolate and similar products at the end of a conveying or processing line.

And stainless steel can be subjected to any method of cleaning – steam, pressure, detergents, brushes, chemicals, even aggressive scrapers – to ensure the lowest levels of bacteria and the highest standards of hygiene.

IPCO supplies belts for use in OEM systems and it can also supply every aspect of a steel-belt conveying unit, including drums, compact belt tracking devices, belt and drum cleaners, safety scrapers and belt-edge detectors, cast-iron skid bars, graphite skid bars and both active and passive belt-tracking controls.

Engineers can advise on upgrade paths or optimum process layouts, and the company’s worldwide technical support network means that installations and commissioning can be carried out quickly and efficiently.

The company can also supply complete, standalone conveyor units that represent best practice in terms of hygienic food conveying. These feature a stainless-steel framework designed to allow access for cleaning, with no narrow gaps or other hard-to-reach places in which dirt, debris and bacteria could otherwise collect.

The framework is designed to minimise the risk of water pooling after cleaning, reducing the possibility of bacterial growth. The stainless-steel conveyor belt is “endless welded” to eliminate any trace of a joint and its smooth surface means there are no hidden gaps or recesses in which bacteria could collect. All bearings are food approved and lubricated for life with food-approved lubricating grease. The motor is food-approved and has IP65 protection.

Enhanced technical and service support throughout Oceania
In line with the strategic vision for business growth in the region, IPCO recently announced its relocation to a new office, warehouse and workshop facility at Burwood, Victoria. This new facility will enable IPCO to increase efficiency and enhance support capabilities – resulting in stronger partnerships with clients throughout Oceania.

SIA happy with state of fisheries

Seafood Industry Australia (SIA), the national peak-body representing Australia’s commercial fishing industry, is delighted that for the sixth consecutive year our solely Commonwealth managed fisheries are in great shape and being fished sustainably.

The release of the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES) ‘Fishery status reports 2019’ highlights the quality of Australia’s Commonwealth fisheries management.

“This is great news and is unprecedented internationally,” SIA CEO Jane Lovell said.
“The ‘Fishery status reports 2019’ provides an evaluation of 96 Australian commercial fish stocks.

READ MORE: Positive outlook for Australian fish stocks

“This positive report card given for the sixth consecutive year to Australia’s solely Commonwealth managed fisheries is the ultimate endorsement that Australia continues to be a leader in world class seafood, and sustainability.

“Australians should be proud of their seafood industry which provides fresh, high-quality seafood, year-round. “As fishers, our priority is the ocean. We advocate the health, sustainability and future of our ocean. It’s our livelihood and the future livelihood of generations to come.”

How to improve your energy efficiency

Ahead of chairing the ‘Agribusiness and food processors: Smart energy use from farm to plate’ speaker session at the inaugural Energy Efficiency Expo, Bradley Anderson (Manager of Business Energy Solutions at the Energy Efficiency Council) shares his advice for food businesses looking to manage their energy intensive operations and improve efficiency.

Question: What are the biggest energy challenges for Australian businesses?
In my role at the Energy Efficiency Council I am responsible for business engagement and energy management market transformation. What I continue to see is Australian businesses grappling with electricity and gas prices unlike anything they’ve seen before. For many industries these rapidly rising costs are a challenge they’re not capable of dealing with easily. Due to Australia’s historically cheap energy, many Australian businesses have pursued a procurement focused energy strategy and once cheap supply contracts are secured, they haven’t paid attention to the energy management opportunities available behind the meter. Now that wholesale electricity prices have doubled and wholesale gas prices have tripled, businesses need to act quickly to offset these rapid rises in energy prices.

READ MORE: Energy efficiency Expo to focus on improving energy use at cutting costs

Question: Why should Australian businesses focus on improving energy usage & reducing their environmental impact?
Most experts agree that the electricity and gas price peaks of 2017 are unlikely to be replicated, but they also expect market prices to stabilise well above their historic averages. Costs are shifting rapidly, yet the transformation of Australia’s energy system has only just begun. Businesses that are leading when it comes to energy strategy have a clear understanding of how the energy system is evolving, the trends or technology driving this transformation, and how they can leverage these to thrive.

Question: Why are food businesses, especially their supply chains, so energy intensive & how can they be managed?
The supply chain for food businesses requires energy to be used in three fundamental ways to generate products and profit. From farm to plate, energy is required to move resources around such as pumping water to irrigate crops, or for heating things up like when baking bread or sterilising packaging, and for cooling food goods down in storage facilities or transporting to stores. Despite this reliance on energy intensive processes coupled with rapidly rising energy costs, since 2006 Australia’s agricultural industry has become 21% less productive with the energy it uses. The positive news is that there are still many ‘low hanging fruit’ opportunities to reduce energy consumption within the supply chain, however, without a systematic approach to energy management many of these low-cost and even no-cost opportunities won’t be identifiable. The simple fact is that businesses need quality data and analysis to make effective business decisions – and the same applies to energy.

Question: What approach can agribusinesses and food processors take to reviewing their energy use, management and supply?
Food business and agriculture are no different to any other sector, so developing a strategy for ongoing improvement of energy performance and having the data to inform effective decision-making is the best place to start. Additionally, the Commonwealth, New South Wales and Victorian Governments all have active programs to assist agribusinesses and food processors review and better manage their energy use.

Question: How does energy efficiency improvement benefit business?
In the agriculture industry, for example, we know that 74% of identified savings within small to medium agricultural businesses have a direct payback within 5 years, which shows large portions of energy saving can be unlocked through project implementation. Again, there are Government assistance program available to support these projects or help from expert advisors is also available.

Question: Is there a general approach agribusiness and food business can apply to improve energy efficiency within operations?
The traditional ‘plan, do, check, act’ cycle of implementing and continuously improving a formal energy management system has proven results, with energy savings of up to 30% being achieved regularly by businesses that actively participate in energy management programs throughout the world.

Question: Is there a single piece of advice or a recommendation you can give to food business and agribusiness about energy efficiency?
Yes, managing your energy use doesn’t have to cost you a lot of money, in fact it doesn’t have to cost you any money.

The inaugural Energy Efficiency Expo will be held from 23-24 October 2019, at the Melbourne Convention & Exhibition Centre, with a focus on helping organisations solve their energy affordability and productivity challenges through insights shared in the conference and solutions displayed on the exhibitor floor.

Visitors will also have the benefit of gaining access to the co-located All-Energy Australia and Waste Expo Australia. All-Energy Australia is the industry’s largest all-encompassing clean energy event, with a theme of ‘Advancing Australia’s transition to a clean energy future’ in 2019. Waste Expo Australia is also a free-to-attend industry event applicable to professionals within the waste management and wastewater treatment industries.

Together, the three industry events, will combine to form Australia’s most comprehensive opportunity for businesses to learn about renewable energy, energy efficiency and sustainable solutions.

DuPont launches dairy-free protective cultures for plant-based fermented products

DuPont Nutrition & Biosciences has announced a new ingredient – Holdbac YM VEGE – as the latest addition to the DuPont Danisco Holdbac line of protective cultures, known for their ability to extend shelf-life and secure the quality of products by holding off yeast and mold spoilage – all without use of synthetic preservatives.

Now, Holdbac YM VEGE brings this effective and label-friendly spoilage prevention to plant-based, fermented foods and beverages, at a time when customer demand in this space has never been higher.

“The industry has seen enormous growth for fermented plant-based products in recent years, driven by higher numbers of flexitarian, vegetarian or vegan consumers around the world. These shifts in diets are driven by a number of factors, including a search for improved health that comes with a plant-based diet, ethical choices toward foods with lower environmental impact and which are deemed better for animal welfare, and switching to dairy alternatives for lactose-intolerant consumers,” said Eve Martinet-Bareau, global product manager, cultures for plant-based fermented food and beverages.

READ MORE: Burcon to build $70 million pea and canola protein production plant

“DuPont Nutrition & Biosciences has been working with customers for decades as consumer demands for plant-based options have increased, and we are constantly looking for ways to innovate in this space,” added Martinet-Bareau. “For example, in May 2018, we launched a new cultures line – Danisco Vege Cultures – especially designed for fermented plant-based products, helping customers attain desired taste and texture profiles in a wide variety of plant-based dairy alternatives and beverages.”

However, with that demand came certain challenges for producers of fermented goods, including the need to:

  • Gain market share in the fast-growing plant-based food sector;
  • consistently ensure high-quality products with the desired taste and texture, particularly across regions with differing consumer preferences;
  • secure that quality throughout a product’s shelf-life;
  • address the fast-growing demand for friendly labeled consumer products;
  • make a substantial contribution to the sustainability of the food and beverage sector; and
  • provide consumers with products that improve their health and wellbeing.

“As more consumers look for fermented food and drinks, our HOLDBAC® YM VEGE cultures will help our customers meet that demand.”

This innovative new ingredient also offers customers the ability to make a significant difference in terms of environmental and social impact through reduced food waste and plant-based alternatives. The potential impact is massive: DuPont has estimated that if just 5 percent of the global yogurt market is replaced with plant-based alternatives made with Danisco Vege and Holdbac YM Vege cultures, the carbon dioxide emission saving would theoretically be as high as 3,000,000 tons CO2 annually. This would be roughly equivalent to 1,700,000 EU-based cars off the roads.

“We are thrilled to add Holdbac YM Vege to our range of plant-based and sustainable offerings,” said Mikkel Thrane, Global Sustainability Lead for DuPont Nutrition & Biosciences. “We look at our environmental footprint through the lens of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and we are proud to say that this culture supports at least three – SDG 3 (good health and well-being), SDG 12 (responsible production and Consumption) and SDG 13 (climate action). Holdbac YM Vege is helping us facilitate the transition to a healthier and more environmental-friendly diet.”

This transition to a healthier diet for people and the planet is powered by DuPont’s expertise in microbiology, food protection and fermentation, as well its commitment to developing and offering more sustainable ingredients for customers

New Rockwell Automation regional vp looks to spread wings in Asia

Scott Wooldridge has spent most of his career in the automation space, and he knows that now more than ever, automation’s time has come. Over the past 40 years many factories have implemented automation in all its various forms. However, over that time, the main driver was saving on labour costs. And if companies didn’t automate, they took their manufacturing business where labour was not only abundant, but cheap.

And while automation hasn’t always worked – the Australian car industry being one example – the industrialised world is now entering a new phase, which is being headed by the IoT and Industry 4.0.

As the regional vice-president of Rockwell Automation, Wooldridge’s brief covers Australasia, Japan, Korea and Southeast Asia. Rockwell Automation has always been one of the big players in the Australasian market, but now it’s time for the American-based automation giant to spread it wings into the ever-increasing lucrative market to Australia’s north. This is a challenge that Wooldridge, and the company, are up for.

“When it comes to our traditional controller space – motion control, PLCs, HDMI, networking – we have large market share, particularly in Australia,” he said. “Less so in the other countries in Asia Pacific. We see huge opportunities for us in these other countries when it comes to our core business. We would be the market leader in Australia and New Zealand, but we have much different competition in Asia. There, we’ve got some home-grown Asia Pacific manufacturers like Omron, Yokogawa and Mitsubishi that have grown up in the region. However, we have differentiated offers in those markets, which is very important.

READ MORE: Rockwell Automation acquires Mestech

“Asia is a region that we are looking at working closely with and collaborating together to be able to exchange resources and best practices across those countries. Particularly on some of our newer product solutions and offerings that are emerging quickly, we can work with agility and share those areas of expertise.”

According to Wooldridge, there is a misnomer that Asia, as a whole, is an emerging market.
“You look at China, and some people call it an emerging market, but it is the second largest in the world now. It’s definitely emerged,” he said. “We do see other markets in the region – Vietnam for example – that are coming from a low base. It is quickly developing a manufacturing base.”

He thinks quality is an issue in the food and beverage industry when it comes to products from China, which has been to Australia’s advantage. He said Australia is seen as a high-quality food bowl into China and its emerged middle class has created a huge demand.
“We can see it in wine exports, for example. We can see it in the dairy products and baby powder, where they have confidence in our quality and they see Australian products as a luxury brand, which is a good thing,” he said. “That’s where we want to be positioned. We don’t want to be a mass market provider. We can tap into the top 10 per cent in China, which is still 150 million people – seven times our population and they are happy to pay a premium for a luxury brand. That is a good reputation for Australia to have.”

As well as increasing the company’s presence in Asia, Wooldridge is charged with consolidating its leadership role within Australasia. He’s sees plenty of opportunities available where Rockwell Automation can expand, especially in the IoT space. While new manufacturing and processing facilities will have automation as part of their build, it is the SMEs and companies that should refurbish that should to look at implementing the IoT products.

Some CEOs and CFOs may think of the IoT as an unnecessary capital expenditure cost. While spending is necessary, there are a couple of positive outputs they should be thinking about, said Wooldridge.

He advises against going like a bull at a gate, and replacing all the plant and machinery at once. Stakeholders should take their time when starting on the IoT journey. There are several plus sides to this. First, it allows those running the factory to see how even little implementations can save on time and other efficiencies. Second, if it is done gradually, companies can fund it via their operational budget because they are saving money on maintenance. Then, there is the scenario of, “what if you don’t implement IoT strategies?”

“We suggest having a five-year plan. Manufacturers will find it more expensive every year to keep the old equipment running,” said Wooldridge. “A lot of the time, we speak to people and they are already spending operationally on old equipment, or old automation gear they might have running, which only does a tenth of what their equipment should do. For a start, they can divert some of that maintenance spend into the new equipment, which will have less maintenance requirement because it is new.”

He is also quick to point out that a plant manager’s expectation that the new digital manufacturing solutions will start providing insights and outcomes quickly is a fair one.

“One of the overarching premises of IoT initiatives is that applications should be quick to deploy and deliver success,” he said. “There shouldn’t be a roll out of technology for technology’s sake. It should be agile technologies that you should be able to get a benefit from within three months of being installed.”

And don’t think that all older equipment needs to be replaced or is redundant, he said. Automation and IoT-enabled equipment can run in conjunction with gear already onsite.

“It is meant to run parallel with existing systems – your control system, your MES system or ERP system, traditional layer one, two, three, or four systems,” said Wooldridge. “An IoT platform should be able to pull data out of any of those systems easily, mash it together, and give you reporting and analytics quickly.”

The company works with the traditional manufacturing sectors, including oil and gas, mining and the food and beverage sectors. Wooldridge said there is good investment at the moment in adopting new technology across these segments including looking at higher levels of traditional automation.

“The reason is, if you are doing a greenfield factory, quite often we hear the term ‘lights out’,” he said. “In other words, how can we get it to the point where it is so automated that it is basically running itself? I don’t think that is practical or possible for all scenarios, but I think we can get far closer. I think if you have global competition, then you need to continue to evolve and invest in automation at a local level.”

Over the next few years, Rockwell expects to a step change in the IoT space and the process markets, such as the more traditional heavy process markets including oil, gas and chemical.

“We are making heavy investments in R&D and partnerships, and to Rockwell these markets are alike,” said Wooldridge. “Very close to automation and factory businesses. But they are new markets, so there is a lot of upside potential for us where we have a lot of customers that have historically used our equipment on a lot of the periphery of their processes – including food and beverage – but not at the core of it, particularly in the heavy industry space. We have ambition to the take the core, as well as protecting our factory and automation space and gaining growth in the IoT platforms space.”

Safe flooring for dairy factories

According to the Australian Department of Agriculture, the country’s dairy industry accounted for $4.4 billion of Australia’s gross value of agricultural production and around seven per cent of the country’s export income. It has a reputation for producing good quality products that are in huge demand around the world.

In order to keep this reputation intact, the factories where food and beverages are produced have to adopt clean and safe working environments. Not only for the sake of the products themselves, but for the workers, too.

A key area of any factory is its floor space. The ever-demanding world of cheese and dairy manufacturing offer tough conditions for flooring in most facilities that produce and process the products. Typically, with the producers of milk and milk ingredients such as cheese, ice cream, butter, cream and yogurt, face a common challenge with concrete corrosion, as well as dangerous, damp and wet conditions, which are compounded by heavy impact traffic.

READ MORE: The right brew for beverage and distillery flooring

Dairy processing floors are exposed to aggressive acids and alkaline chemical cleaners, including Clean in Place (CIP) chemicals. Heavy-duty, epoxy-trowelled flooring from a company such as Roxset Health and Safety Floor Coatings handles a range of corrosive acids. This includes nitric and phosphoric acid typically found in processing and chemical storage areas. Milk and other ingredients break down on the floor, forming acidic by-products that can also damage the concrete. It is critical that companies protect their concrete from oils and chemical deterioration, while handling impact, abrasion and thermal cycling.

There are strict regulations in the dairy industry, which are required in order to meet Food Standards Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code (FSC) Standard 4.2.4. This is a primary standard that dairy farms must adhere to and follow assiduously. Food Standards Australia New Zealand, Standard 3.2.2 – Food Safety Practices and General Requirements states: “Floors must be designed and constructed in a way that is appropriate for the activities conducted on the food premises”.

When the facility gets wet, which is common in dairy production, it can lead to serious slip issues. This can escalate into expensive lawsuits if care and caution are not taken. It is critical that an anti-slip HACCP complaint aggregate is built into the full thickness of the floor. The profile of this would typically be between 6-10mm for maximum protection. Drains are important in tackling slip hazards where is it important to contour the falls with the correct anti-slip aggregates. It is these types of considerations that Roxset looks into when laying down epoxy flooring at factories that specialise in dairy products.

A dairy facility floor is also challenged by extremes, like cold conditions in the coolers and warm conditions in the processing raw milk and intake side.

This is where a potential for thermal shock and thermal cycling in the floor can occur leading to damage. A heavy-duty non-toxic HACCP epoxy coating from a company like Roxset will be sensitive to any shock. However, it can also handle very hot wash downs, which are also needed in order to keep a factory in excellent condition.

HPP technology will change the future

High Pressure Processing (HPP) has been around 30 years but has become mainstream in the last few years, and will disrupt the juice industry, according to Botanica managing director, Richard Magney.

HPP is a cold pasteurisation technique used to eliminate vegetable flora. Utilising 6000 bar of pressure (there is 37 bar of pressure in your car tyre), it destructs the DNA of vegetable flora, so they no longer survive or multiply.

Due to an absence of heat treatment, enzymes, nutrients and key minerals are not affected, and flavour is amplified.

“In the world of orange juice, it is the closest thing to eating an orange,” Magney said.

“Five years ago, Botanica fell into HPP by default. We’d been trading for 12 months as a small juice company in Bondi, and the Neil Perry culinary team asked us to supply QANTAS first and business class with fresh juice, but he had a very specific brief; no preservatives and maximum vitamin retention.

“We were challenged with a difficult task – fresh juice without compromising flavour. No heat treatment but safe to drink. We were turning over $100,000 at the time, supplying cafes and small markets.”

READ MORE: CSIRO – four new technologies for food processing

They googled and found HPP technology, which he says is considered one of the world’s fastest growing food and processing disruption aids.

“Disruption can only truly occur when both the product is superior to other products in the market and economies of scale allows for both domestic and international distribution.

“The juice world we lived in 20 years ago isn’t the juice world we live in today, and the juice world we live in today won’t be the juice world we live in in another 20 years.

“There is a generational shift occurring. It won’t be the ability to change the fruit, but the availability to change the technology that will be the catalyst for the shift.

“There are companies around the world right now with dedicated scientists and engineers working to crack the code for an inline automated juicing and HPP process, which will allow juice companies to reengineer their entire outlook on what they perceive is fresh juice, and more importantly, what consumers perceive fresh juice to really be.

“It takes the inertia of two forces to create seismic change, and this is coming in the form of consumer demand and technological innovation.

“The single goal for HPP technology manufacturers is to democratise fresh. Today, fresh is expensive. The chilled category is pricey, the ambient aisle is cheap.”

Magney said HPP technology manufacturers know that if they are to remain relevant, they need to design tech that allows fresh to be affordable and accessible to all consumers no matter what their socio-economic status.

“Billions of dollars of public and private capital around the world are being poured into this generational shift of redefining the word fresh. If we stare into the crystal ball, we’ll see a global movement into greater wellbeing.

“Millennials are smart, and so is the wave of Gen A behind them, and Gen B behind them. If I was a betting man, I’d double down on HPP as most desired form of juice and viscous food in 10 years.”

Magney said in the last five years, more companies around the world have invested in HPP technology, including Coke, Pepsi, Starbucks and Hain Celestial. Coke invested in HPP in Australia in Oct, 2018.

“Today’s millennials that are spending more money on wellness and reading packaging word for word, will be the buyers, category managers, and executives of Woolworths, Coles, Aldi and Costco in the future. Understanding today’s market is critical, but understanding the future market is power.”

Nuvo-7164GC – rugged, embedded PC for high-performance graphics processing

Backplane Systems Technology has annonced the release Neousys Technology’s new Nuvo-7164GC rugged edge artificial intelligence inference platforms which is designed for advanced inference acceleration applications such as Voice, Video, and Image Services.

The Nuvo-7164GC supports NVIDIA Tesla P4 GPU featuring 5.5 TFLOPS in FP32 and Tesla T4 GPU featuring 8.1 TFLOPS in FP32 and 130 TOPs in INT8 for real-time inference based on a Trained Neural Network Model. In addition, it supports Intel 9/8th-Gen Coffee Lake Core 8/ 6-core CPU and 32GB DDR4-2666, offering great balance between CPU, GPU, and memory performance.

As Neousys’ patented cassette and air tunnel design, which guides the intake air flow through the passive Heat Sink of NVIDIA Tesla P4/T4, Nuvo-7164GC is capable of effectively dissipating the heat generated by the GPU. This design allows system operation of up to 60°C ambient temperature with sustained 100 per cent GPU loading.

READ MORE: IBase’s CSB200-818 slim fanless system

Nuvo-7164GC also incorporates cutting-edge I/O technologies to boost overall system flexibility, functionality and performance. It has an M.2 NVMe interface that supports disk read/ write speeds over 2000 MB/s and USB 3.1/ GbE ports for fast data transfer, such as acquiring HD video data.

With its innovative combination of fast CPU and inference accelerator GPU, the Nuvo-7164GC is the ideal platform for AI inference, deep learning, autonomous driving, facial recognition, and machine vision.

 Key Features:

  • Supports NVIDIA Tesla P4/ T4 GPU
  • Dedicated heat dissipation for -25°C to 60°C wide-temperature range operation
  • Intel 9th/ 8th-gen core Hexa-Core 35W/ 65W LGA1151 CPU
  • 6x GigE ports, 802.3at PoE+ option available (Ports 3~6)
  • 2 2280 M key NVMe (Gen3 x4) socket for fast storage access
  • 4x USB 3.1 gen2 ports and 4x USB 3.1 gen1 ports
  • Accommodates two 2.5p-inch SATA HDD/SSD with RAID 0/1 support
  • MezIO interface for easy function expansion

Compact toothed belt axis for automation in the tightest of spaces

Fast automation in confined installation spaces: igus has now developed an extra-compact toothed belt axis based on its flat drylin N linear system. The new axis consists of a standard fitment of components and is therefore cost-effective and easily assembled within a few minutes. Equipped with motor and control, the new system can carry loads of up to 20 Newton and a translation of 60mm per revolution.

From the lubrication-free plain bearing and the maintenance-free linear guide up to the ready-to-install linear robot, igus develops solutions for the industry with its plastics either as a single part or as a system. With the help of its linear construction kit, the company has combined its drylin N low-profile linear guide with a toothed belt and has now developed the new cost-effective drylin ZLN toothed belt axis as standard. Whether in vending machines, service robotics or even in automation systems, the new compact toothed belt system can be installed quickly and easily in the smallest of spaces. The flat drylin N linear guide ensures compact construction, which is just 27mm high and 40mm wide. The toothed belt mounted on ball bearings enables high speed dynamics. With the combination of low-profile linear guide and toothed belt, loads up to 20 Newton can be moved vertically at a ratio of 60mm per revolution.

By using high-performance polymers in the sliding carriage, users can completely dispense with lubricants and thus, the maintenance of the unit. Moisture, dirt and dust are no problem for the drylin ZLN because it has great advantages, especially for machines that are in use 24/7.

Plug in, install, low cost
The new toothed belt axis for low-cost automation consists of standard components from the drylin modular system that can be fitted together and assembled quickly. Therefore, the new axis is not only lightweight due to the use of plastic components, but also cost-effective and delivered quickly. A ready-to-install drylin ZLN can be ordered with NEMA stepper motors or with EC/BLDC DC motors, as well as a suitable drive control system. The new, cost-effective toothed-belt axis can be delivered from Treotham in the desired size with a maximum length of up to 750mm from 24 hours.

Consumer demand expected to boost cheddar cheese market

There has been a shift in consumer preferences towards various types of nutrient and protein-rich foods that also promise healthy substitutes to everyday consumable products. Cheddar cheese is a multipurpose food product that has been used in the food industry in numerous applications.

The availability of cheddar cheese in the bakery sector and food product companies are increasing as a basic ingredient in most of the food preparations requiring cheese. This has boosted the demand for cheddar cheese in the global market. Increasing consumption of cheese in various types of cuisines is also anticipated to boost the overall production of cheddar cheese in the food industry.

Cheddar cheese is increasingly being preferred over natural cheese in several bakery and snack preparations. This has also led to increased consumption and hence production in the global market. Furthermore, growing consumer demand for cheese-based breakfast products is also expected to lead to a rise in the utilization of cheddar cheese in different breakfast products.

Study found that cheddar cheese fanatics are always experimenting with food and manufacturers are coming up with new varieties of food items. Moreover, the trend of fine gourmet, cuisine and luxury culinary items has inspired manufacturers to innovate their products in order to cater to the taste preferences of consumers. As a result, the development of block cheddar cheese is expected to trigger a mass demand for cheddar cheese especially in hotels, restaurants, and cafes. A growth in the demand for gourmet and artisanal cheese products is a key factor which is likely to boost the cheddar cheese market in the long run. The expansion of online and retail outlets resulting in the easy obtainability of cheddar cheese is anticipated to create lucrative opportunities for manufacturers in the coming years.

READ MORE: Global dairy commodity update

Europe and North America markets are moving towards a saturation point, so manufacturers of cheddar cheese are looking for regions that will present them with versatile opportunities in the future. The growing cheddar cheese market in Latin America will open a plethora of opportunities for market players to capitalize on. Europe is the largest consumer of cheese in the world. Several varieties of cheese are available in the region and the application of cheddar cheese is also widespread in the food industry in Europe.

Asia Pacific Excluding Japan (APEJ) is the third largest consumer of cheddar cheese and related products in the world. With the growing acceptance of western culture in the region, the food habits and taste preferences of people are also increasing at an extensive rate. In spite of the growing disposable income of people in the region, consumers still look for inexpensive food options. As a result, the demand for cheddar cheese is increasing in several countries in APEJ.

The study also found that Japan is slowly emerging as one of the lucrative markets for cheddar cheese with the trend of mild snacking increasing in the region. Moreover, with the trend of drinking gaining traction in Japan, having light snacks especially cheddar cheese has increased considerably as a home trend. Middle East and Africa is anticipated to present manufacturers of cheddar cheese with new and lucrative growth prospects. As the governments in these regions are looking forward to generate revenue from other sources apart from oil reserves, a variety of industries are emerging as highly profitable options. For instance, in September 2019, Arla Foods a Scandinavian dairy products company will scale up its commitment to develop a sustainable dairy sector in Nigeria.

This study underlines key opportunities in the cheddar cheese market and finds that the market would exhibit growth at a value CAGR of – 3 per cent during the forecast period.

v2food and CSIRO launch plant-based meat alternative

Australia’s newest plant-based meat startup, v2food, has been launched via an innovative partnership between CSIRO, Main Sequence Ventures and Jack Cowin’s Competitive Foods Australia.

v2food is a sustainable, plant-based alternative to meat. It looks like meat, cooks like meat and tastes like meat. It was formed by CSIRO’s Innovation Fund, managed by Main Sequence Ventures, a part of the Australian Government’s National Innovation and Science Agenda (NISA), in 2018.

Competitive Foods Australia, the company behind Hungry Jack’s, also contributed seed funding to help launch the startup. With the backing of both government and industry, v2food had all the right ingredients for success from day one. The company is led by former Masterfoods and PepsiCo research director, Nick Hazell.

The company’s rapid growth, from foundation to national launch in eight months, is a result of the team’s access to CSIRO’s expansive network of expertise.

CSIRO provided research and development resources to v2food on a research-for-equity arrangement. While a one-man-team at the beginning, Hazell had access to hundreds of the best scientific minds to help perfect the product.

READ MORE: Burcon to build $70 million pea and canola protein production plant

“Making meat alternatives from plants is not a new idea but at v2food we’ve taken it a step further,” said Hazell. “We are on a journey to make plant-based food both taste better and be more sustainable. The protein substitutes available to date simply don’t taste as good as meat and they are not affordable.

“We’ve drawn upon the best food, nutrition and sustainability science from CSIRO to develop a sustainable and nutritious product, with an unmatched texture and flavour.

The goal is for our product to be a delicious alternative to meat, accessible to every Australian,” said Hazell.

Recognising that there is a need for a ‘version 2’ of the food system, v2food’s range of plant-based meat products taste great and is suited for all consumers.

Made from legumes, the company’s ‘mince’ looks and tastes like quality meat and contains added fibre and nutrients.

“We seem to have the right resources for success,” chairman and CEO of Competitive Foods Australia Jack Cowin said. “With CSIRO’s outstanding research and technology capabilities, the passion of the v2food team led by Nick Hazell and Competitive Foods Australia’s ability to help build and commercialise businesses, we believe that we have the ingredients for a successful venture.

“We’ve seen a huge opportunity for plant-based proteins and the category is set to explode. I’ve eaten beef all my life but I’ve tasted the v2food and it tastes as good as beef.

“Therefore, we can’t wait to take v2food to consumers with some fantastic new products,” he said.

v2food has been collaborating with the grain and meat industries to add plant-based meat to the Australian agricultural story. CSIRO projects this new industry to be worth more than $6 billion by 2030 in Australia. This provides a big opportunity for existing meat and grain producers. It is estimated that by 2050 the world’s population will need twice the amount of food we consume today.

Australia doesn’t currently have the capability to process legumes for plant-based meat alternatives. v2food, with the help of CSIRO, is working on developing this capability to create an all Australian value chain.

v2food will begin to appear in restaurants and cafes throughout the remainder of the year and aims to have a leading presence in-store and in cafes around Australia by early 2020.

Australian and Chinese meat sectors sign MOU

A new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the Australian and Chinese meat sectors highlights the importance of China to Australian industry and underlines a commitment to collaboration on both sides, according to Australian Meat Industry Council CEO Patrick Hutchinson.

The MOU is the result of 18 months of preparations and discussions which kicked off at the China International Meat Industry Week in 2018.

AMIC CEO Mr Hutchinson signed The China Australia Red Meat Agreement (CARMA) MOU with the China Meat Association in Chengdu, China today on behalf of the Australian Meat Industry Council, Meat & Livestock Australia and the Australian Meat Processor Corporation.

“China is the biggest export market for Australian meat, and maintaining and enhancing our relationship with this critical partner is essential for the future of our industry. This MOU serves to reinforce the strong value our sector places on the relationship and our great respect for China as a very important trading partner,” he said.

Belt meets rigorous food safety standards

Today’s food consumers’ preferences are constantly evolving. Ingredients, packaging and portion sizes mean an operation is constantly adjusting to meet demand.

What remains constant throughout this change is the need to reduce costs, achieve sustainable operational objectives and ensure rigorous food safety requirements are met.
With Rexnord, its KleanTop line of plastic modular belts is designed specifically for food processing.

Its team of industry experts is here to help users find the right product for their operation, enabling them to meet internal production goals and deliver high-quality food for their customers.

Each belt in the KleanTop line has been designed to give food processors confidence that the conveyor they install is safe and delivers high performance in food processing applications. Each product series within the line offers a unique set of benefits for a variety of food processing applications, including:

• Food-safe materials and colours approved for direct food contact, and ideal for longevity — even in harsh applications and frequent sanitation.

• Being designed to convey optimal loads in applications to maintain throughput levels with minimal product damage.

• Optimised rod retention designs that make assembly and disassembly faster, and keep the rod in place during conveyance.

• Reinforced designs to minimise risk of product contamination.

Corporate stewardship is a shared endeavour for everyone, according to Rexnord. Eliminating waste is an important element in any company’s quest for a more sustainable operation and to do its part in taking care of the planet.

READ MORE: Art Dynamic Chain for package and parcelling applications

Rexnord’s focus on engineered sustainability means companies can partner with them for products and support that guarantee optimal product handling while helping users meet productivity goals and minimise water and chemical usage.

Optimise productivity
The reliability and durability of the conveyor belting and components determine total uptime and cost to keep the line performance at required levels. Rexnord’s team of experts can help users upgrade their conveyors to increase productivity by using state-of-the-art designs and materials for the belts and components.

Minimise water and chemical usage
Sanitation is a critical part of food processing, but it also means more water and chemicals used to clean systems. Rexnord focusses on ways to help users reduce the need for excess water in sanitation through easily cleaned belt designs, or consultation on designing conveyor systems that reduce water usage overall.

Plastic modular belting
Each belting series in the KleanTop line offers a set of unique benefits to the food processing industry including reinforced edges, open hinge for ease in sanitation, and rod retention designs.

390 Series KleanTop
This unit has superior transfer capability suitable for applications with delicate baked goods, or any operation requiring careful handling of fragile products. It has a belt pitch of 8mm.

590 Series KleanTop
This belt has an optimal combination of ease in cleaning and transfer capability for the bakery, snack, fruit, vegetable, seafood, and poultry industries. It has a belt pitch of 12.7mm.

1010 Series KleanTop
This series has 60 per cent rod exposure for maximum sanitation. It is for applications in bakery, snack, fruit, vegetable and protein processing. It has a belt pitch of 25.4mm.

1090 Series KleanTop
The 1090 is designed for ease in cleaning and efficient maintenance to reduce downtime in bakery, snack, fruit, vegetable, seafood and poultry processing. It has a belt pitch of 25.4mm.

Nestlé expands plant-based burger range

Nestlé is expanding its plant-based food range in the US and Switzerland.

The launches come just days after Nestlé announced its ambition to achieve zero net greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, including by offering more plant-based food and beverages.

In both countries, Nestlé is launching plant-based burgers and grounds, with ingredients and recipes customised to meet local tastes. All the products look and cook like raw beef and provide a juicy, meat-like taste and texture.

In the United States, Sweet Earth Foods has announced the launch of their newest products, the Awesome Burger and Awesome Grounds. Both deliver on the taste and texture of beef with the environmental and nutritional benefits offered by plant-based proteins.

READ MORE: Plant-based protein worth $25 billion by 2030

The Awesome Burger is made with yellow pea protein, resulting in a burger that is high in protein and fiber. Sweet Earth’s Awesome Grounds will provide the same plant-based protein in a ground version that allows greater flexibility to cook various meals and sides, such as meatballs and tacos. Acquired by Nestlé in 2017, Sweet Earth has over 60 plant-based products in their portfolio.

In Switzerland, Nestlé is introducing its Garden Gourmet Incredible Burger and the new Garden Gourmet Incredible Mince. The two add to the already expanding Garden Gourmet range in Switzerland, which also includes many ‘veggie-centric’ options. The burger is made from soy and wheat protein and the mince from soy protein. Both contain natural plant extracts – beetroot, carrot, and bell pepper – and vegetable fats including chopped coconut oil.

The new Garden Gourmet Incredible Mince is just as versatile and juicy as ground beef. It is easily shapeable, making it perfect to create balls or skewers that can be seasoned to taste. It can also be crumbled up in a pan, for example to make a delicious Bolognese sauce or ‘Chili Sin Carne’.

Cleanaway and Coles team up over waste initiative

A Coles supermarket in Sydney’s west has become the first Australian supermarket to trial zero waste to landfill, as one of several initiatives to help Coles meet its commitment to become Australia’s most sustainable supermarket.

As part of a trial, the supermarket in Wentworth Point is sending zero waste to landfill, preventing the equivalent of 6 ½ shopping trolleys going to landfill each day.

The purpose of the trial is to change in-store processes, put greater focus on source separation, and to partner with new facilities to use waste as a resource. This will mean more packaged and unpackaged food, cardboard, plastic, metal, glass, wax boxes, polystyrene and timber will be diverted from landfill.

Coles Chief Property and Export Officer Thinus Keeve says the trial of a zero waste to landfill store will help Coles find new ways to reduce waste in stores.

“Waste management is a key component of the sustainability of any business and reducing waste is a very important issue for our customers,” said Reeve. “Everyone knows Australia has challenges in how we deal with our waste. That goes for everyone from households sorting their recycling to businesses like Coles. We all have a responsibility to play our part.”

READ MORE: Challenges abound for food waste solutions

The zero waste to landfill trial store will find new ways to recover residual dry waste such as mixed plastic and timber which historically has been the most difficult to divert from landfill.

Coles is partnering with Cleanaway to recover energy from this waste through the Cleanaway ResourceCo Recovery Facility (RRF) in Wetherill Park. The facility uses dry waste to produce Process Engineered Fuel (PEF), which is then used to offset the demands of heavy industry for fossil fuels.

Cleanaway’s Alex Hatherley, Regional Manager, Solid Waste Services NSW, said “This is a great solution for Coles stores that produce high volumes of mixed back-of-house plastics but want to achieve a zero waste to landfill goal.”

“Our facility is unique in its ability to divert commercial dry waste from landfill, recover recyclable materials and then convert the remaining combustibles to a sustainable fuel source, PEF.” Alex explained.

Doug Elliss, General Manager of the Cleanaway ResourceCo Wetherill Park facility said, “We’re playing a key role in Australia’s future sustainable energy mix by reducing waste that would otherwise go to landfill and lowering carbon emissions through production of a commercially viable sustainable fuel.”

The trial comes as Coles Group has released its first Sustainability Report as a stand-alone publicly listed company which sets out Coles commitment to reducing its environmental impact including working towards diverting 90% of waste from landfill by 2022.

“At Coles, we are proud of our partnership with food rescue services Secondbite and Foodbank. Through our supermarkets and distribution centres we donated 12.5 million kilograms of unsold edible food to SecondBite and Foodbank last financial year — the equivalent of 25 million meals for people in need,” Thinus said.

“Many supermarkets also provide food waste directly to farmers to use as animal feed. These stores across our Coles network donated 13.8 million kilograms to farmers last financial year, an increase of 11 per cent.”

“But there is always more that we can do. Everything we can’t give to SecondBite we want to give to farmers to feed their animals, recycle into compost or convert to energy.”

“We were the first Australian supermarket to offer REDcycle plastic recycling in every store. We were the first Australian supermarket to sign a renewable energy PPA, which will see Coles sourcing 10 per cent of its national energy needs from three solar farms in regional NSW.”

“We are now the first Australian supermarket to attempt a zero waste to landfill store. Coles is passionate about driving generational sustainability with innovation that reduces environmental impact.

Input sought on Middle East sheep exports

A discussion paper outlining policy options for sheep exports to, or through, the Middle East during the northern summer months is now available for stakeholder comment.

Minister for Agriculture, Bridget McKenzie, said that live sheep exports were an important part of Australia’s agricultural sector, and underpinned 3,450 jobs across rural and regional Australia.

“The export from Australia of live sheep shipped to, and through, the Middle East resumed on September 23 of this year after the Department of Agriculture prohibited these exports during the northern summer.

READ MORE: Improving oversight in live animal exports

“Feedback on the discussion paper will inform a Regulation Impact Statement (RIS), which will determine the future regulation of live sheep exports to, or through, the Middle East during the northern summer months from 2020 onwards.

“The discussion paper outlines four proposed policy option ideas.

“We are seeking input from stakeholders on the potential economic and regulatory impact of each idea but also welcome alternative options.

“I urge anyone who has a stake in Australia’s live sheep export industry to jump online and have their say on the discussion paper.”

In 2017–18 Australia exported around 2 million live sheep valued at over $259 million to trading partners wanting our high-quality live sheep.

Positive outlook for Australian fish stocks

A new report from the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES) has delivered generally positive news for wild fish stocks in Australian Government managed fisheries.

Acting ABARES Executive Director, Peter Gooday, said the latest Fishery status reports 2019 revealed 70 per cent of fish stocks reviewed were not overfished and not subject to overfishing.

“The reports reflect a generally stable trend of stock status, with only five stocks changing status from last year,” Gooday said.

“A jointly managed stock, striped marlin in the Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery, is now classified as both overfished and subject to overfishing, and Australia is working with the other fishing nations of the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission to try to rectify that.

“In fisheries solely managed by the Australian Government, no stocks were classified as subject to overfishing.

READ MORE: Why mass flow meters are important in fish farming

“However, a number of stocks in these fisheries remain classified as overfished and it is uncertain whether stocks will rebuild under current mortality rates. The
Australian Fisheries Management Authority continues to work with stakeholders on strategies for rebuilding these stocks.

“There is also a small proportion of stocks, in both Australian Government managed and jointly managed fisheries, that are now classified as uncertain due to outdated assessments or to changes in catch that need to be monitored.

“The reports also look at the economic performance of fisheries managed by the Australian Government, with $390 million generated in gross value of production (GVP) in 2017–18. This represents 22 per cent of the $1.79 billion GVP of Australia’s total wild capture fisheries.”

This report forms part of a suite of ABARES publications that provide a comprehensive and multidimensional account of the trends and outlook for Australian fisheries.

Toby’s Estate gets on the oat milk bandwagon with Califia Farms

More Australians than ever before are choosing plant milk over dairy, but there’s one in particular that’s fast becoming the new favourite for coffee – oat milk. With this in mind, Toby’s Estate has teamed up with Califia Farms to offer oat milk to its café customers nationwide.

“With compelling health, ethical and environmental benefits it’s no wonder more people are turning to plant-based diets. When it comes to coffee, they’re now looking for more options than just soy and almond and so we knew we had to listen to our customers,” said Jody Leslie, Toby’s Estate general manager.

After a launch in the US, Califia Farms recently launched its new Oat Barista Blend in Australia and now Toby’s Estate is the first specialty coffee roaster who will soon be distributing it to its café network across Australia, starting with NSW.

READ MORE: Coles to stock locally manufactured goat’s milk

“We found the perfect product in Califia Farms Oat Barista Blend because it’s so creamy and delicious, yet importantly doesn’t overtake the flavour of our coffee. It’s ideal for baristas too because it’s easy to stretch, has a smooth pour and it doesn’t split. It is very close to how full fat milk performs,” added Leslie.

According to Dan Kaplan, national business manager for Califia Farms Australia, in the US oat milk is the number two dairy alternative in coffee shops after almond milk and it looks like Australia is headed in the same direction.

“Oat milk is not only dairy free and not a nut milk, but it’s free from soy and made from a sustainable grain, which makes it a very appealing option for consumers,” said Kaplan.

Califia’s Oat Barista Blend is made from whole rolled oats and is unsweetened with no added sugar, gums, dairy or soy. It also has half the amount of natural sugar than other oat milk brands.

Winmate’s IP69K stainless P-Series with conduit pipe in Panel PC

Backplane Systems Technology has introduced Winmate’s New IP69K stainless P-Series with waterproof conduit pipe Panel PC. It features screen sizes ranging from 15-inches to 23.8-inches, with P-Cap touchscreen to ensure a user-friendly multi-touch experience and a waterproof conduit pipe for extra cable protection. It is engineered to be the perfect terminal for operations in demanding environments that call for uncompromising hygiene requirements, such as in the Food, chemical or pharmaceutical industries

The unit consists of SUS304 stainless steel, the housing is full IP69K-rated water, dust and corrosion-proof, withstanding extensive wash downs with corrosion resistance against cleaning agents, especially against close-range, high-pressure (up to 30 Bar) and high temperature (up to 80°C) Wash Downs.

The custom-built waterproof conduit pipe is preinstalled to give an additional layer of protection for the peripheral cables connected to the device. The included air vent valve comes with an automatic mechanical system to act as a safety device that controls and maintains pressure without the user’s assistance in order to avoid air related problems.

With the projective capacitive technology, the P-series delivers excellent responsive performance, even in extreme environments, by supporting multi-touch and allowing for the use to operate it easily with fingers.

The P-Series boasts versatile mounting options, including Panel, Yoke and VESA Mount, for installation in all the industrial scenarios.

The P-Series IP69K Panel PC is equipped with a high performing Intel Core i5-7200U Kaby Lake processor, meaning it can easily handle multimedia content. The wireless connectivity is not compromised due to the support for wi-fi and Bluetooth for real-time communications and data transfer.

Features include:

  • Custom-built waterproof conduit pipe
  • Close-range, high-pressure (up to 30bar)
  • High temperature (up to 80°C) wash downs
  • Intel Core i5-7200U Kaby Lake 2.5GHz processor
  • 4GB DDR4 2133 (Optional up to 16GB)
  • Screen sizes ranging from 15” ~ 23.8”
  • Support multiple mounts: Panel, Yoke, VESA.

Food regulations helps accelerate natural food colour additives sales

The global natural food colour additives market is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of more than 5 per cent during the forecast period in terms of value. With the growing awareness of the masses towards using clean label products, the usage of natural food colour additives has been gaining traction. The aversion of consumers towards the synthetic and chemical products has been evident in the recent past. The key factors affecting the natural food colour additives market are the increasing downstream demand and consumer health consciousness.

The rules and regulations regarding the chemical content limits have become stringent and have been heavily imposed by various governments. Major changes have been implemented in the global food colour additives market with the introduction of ISO 22000, designed to address food safety management systems. This will help garner significant demand for product in the forecast period.

The demand for the natural and plant derived products is creating significant opportunities for the food and beverage industry. Manufacturing companies are replacing synthetic or artificial colours with natural food colour additives. According to various health associations and organisations, the consumption of food with such additives are beneficial for health, as it fulfils a  range of nutrients demand. The long-term use of the these additives will help the consumers to sustain better food and snacking habits.

READ MORE: Five signs of a lagging food safety culture

These products refer to any substance used to impart desired colour when mixed. Natural food colour additives are either vegetable and fruit derived, or animal derived, or can be obtained from other natural sources. Multiple product offerings are available for natural food colour additives like Carotenoids, Turmeric oleoresin, Enocianina, Paprika oleoresin, Spirulina Extract, Chlorophyll, Carmine and others. The portfolio of these products is increasing day by day.

Catering to the needs of the consumers, industry players have been using natural food colour additives in beverages, milk products, baked goods, confectionery, snack and cereals, soups and sauces, meat products and others. Among beverages, natural food colour additives are used for carbonated soft drinks, energy drinks, milk drinks, juice-based drinks and others. Beverages holds a prominent share for natural food colour additives and is expected to augment the market growth during the forecast period. Use of these additives in dairy products include yogurt, ice cream, frozen dairy products, dips and spreads and cheese. Natural food colour additives in bakeries and similar institutions for making baked goods usually have a standard offering of bread, cakes,  biscuits and cookies. In terms of meat products, these additives are used to make the processed meat and poultry and seafood, aesthetically pleasing.

Due to the shifting consumer behavior toward the vegan and organic trends in United States, the companies with clean labels and organic claims have been gaining special brownie points. The FDA’s ban on PHO’s (Partially Hydrogenated Oils), the majorly used emulsifiers, has created the need for alternatives. The inclination of end use industries for natural food colour additives is due to the broad range of colours and colour stability. Research for cheaper and sustainable ways for extraction of these additives will help the end use industries with a plethora of options. The markets for these products in East Asia and South Asia are expected to have exponential growth rate in the forecast years. Albeit the icky factor that comes with carmine, a colour derived from cochineal beetles, the growth of carmine will hold a steady growth rate in this market