Heat and Control turns 70

Heat and Control has been modernising equipment solutions for seven decades and has revolutionised the food, pharmaceutical, and non-food industries with various new technologies. The company takes pride in the machinery they manufacture and the customers they serve and has developed strategic partnerships to offer customers premium choices, efficiency, and performance.
“We have incredible people in our organisation, customers believe in our abilities, and there is respectful collaboration with our global partners,” affirms Tony Caridis, Heat and Control president.
One of the keys to Heat and Control’s success has been Caridis’ ability to recognise industry-changing technology. Vibratory conveyors dominated the industry until the FastBack horizontal motion conveyor entered the market. The technology caught his attention, “I’m always searching for ways to improve our solutions for our customers, and the FastBack technology fit well into our Heat and Control family of brands. It has grown into a product line that is leading the way in conveying and product handling arena,” explains Caridis.
FastBack – created to improve product quality
Until the 1990s, vibratory conveyors were the industry standard. Blake Svejkovsky, Heat and Control General Manager – Product Handling Systems was working in the food industry and recognised the need for a robust, reliable, maintenance-free, quiet conveying solution gentle enough to avoid product breakage, segregation, and loss of coatings. Together with his father, they created the FastBack horizontal motion conveyor. “One of the best things, from a personal perspective, about growing up around my father, who was an engineer, was learning from someone who had both the ability to think at the very highest levels of physics and the know-how to actually go out into the garage, run a lathe and milling machine, and build things,” recalls Svejkovsky. With clever thinking and design, they created FastBack in 1995 and looked to transform the conveying/product handling industry.
After overcoming misperceptions related to horizontal motion, FastBack quickly grew. Caridis saw an opportunity to boost Heat and Control’s family of brands and move to the next level. The decision to join Heat and Control was simple for Svejkovsky. Besides deep market penetration, Heat and Control was also a family-owned business with a solid reputation in the industry for integrity, reliability, innovative technology, and excellent customer service. They introduced horizontal motion technology to the world’s food processing industry, and it continues to provide gentle, sanitary, and dependable distribution and seasoning solutions with unmatched expertise.
FastBack – trusted for distribution and seasoning
“I think there are really two main contributors to FastBack’s success,” points out Svejkovsky. “The first is Heat and Control’s philosophy that “better-and-better beats better-and-best,” which means that as individuals and as a company, we’re never to consider our work as being done or a solution as the best that we could possibly produce. So then, we’re always innovating, always looking to improve our service and our products to keep our customers operating at the cutting edge of performance.
I’d say that the second contributor to FastBack’s success is simply Heat and Control’s culture of listening to the customer. As with the genesis of the FastBack, Heat and Control develops solutions based on our customers’ feedback, whether it be improvements that we could make to our existing product line or something entirely new. So, the voice of the customer is at the heart of our ever growing and improving product line, and I’m always excited about what we’ll learn next.”
For decades, FastBack technology has been moving the industry forward by providing smarter solutions that improve distribution efficiency throughout the entire plant. With more than thirty patents and more than 20,000 units worldwide, FastBack innovation and attention to detail continues to advance the industry.
Heat and Control – unmatched commitment
With almost 1,600 employees worldwide in more than 30 offices, they bring science, imagination, and unmatched commitment to every project. Heat and Control always strives to do more to help customers bring out the best in their products to market.

Global effort delivers technology to enhance the cooking processes

Most major food safety authorities around the world are aware of acrylamide and its potential health danger to consumers and it has now become a growing concern for snack food manufacturers.

Snack food producers are challenged with finding ways to reduce acrylamide formation during frying without making fundamental changes to their manufacturing process, and without compromising on taste or quality.

To meet this challenge, food processors looked to equipment suppliers, such as Heat and Control, to work with them to develop equipment solutions for potatoes.

A global collaboration
In one such collaboration, Australia-, US- and the UK-based Heat and Control teams worked with a European snack processor and a Swedish tech company ScandiNova to bring to market a solution that has enhanced the cooking process. It made the reduction of acrylamide possible and provided potato processers with a host of valuable additional benefits including improved yield and product quality, increased line efficiency and reduced operational cost.

It came about after research and development, the result of which was an equipment solution that would apply Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) processing to potatoes prior to manufacturing in order to reduce acrylamide. This solution became the E-FLO system, by Heat and Control.

The science of PEF
PEF is a unique non-thermal method of inactivating microorganisms, including many common food pathogens, without heating the product to the usual pasteurisation temperatures.

The destruction or inactivation of the microorganism is achieved by the breakdown of the microorganism’s cell membranes during exposure to electric fields.

PEF has previously been used in the food industry with juices, wine and olives as a means for sterilisation, preservation and for retaining nutritional values.

Heat and Control’s innovation was by the use of this method in a new application and for a different purpose.

For potatoes processors, the use of PEF treatment delivers cell disintegration, in place of the preheater operation. In this application, pulsed electrical fields create micro-pores in cell membranes, which enable the loss of primarily of liquid contents such as asparagine and reducing sugars but not starch loss. Structural and textural changes are also realised, reducing wear on cutting blades, increasing line yield and reducing water usage.

The benefits of this processing method have seen food processors across various industries incorporate this technology into their processing lines.

A January 2020 report by Technavio stated the global food industry PEF systems market is poised to grow to more than $325 million during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of about 24 per cent during the forecast period.

Developing E-FLO to deliver PEF
Partnering with ScandiNova, a provider of solid-state, high-power pulse modulators and RF systems, Heat and Control developed the patent-protected E-FLO Electroporation System to deliver the PEF process to the new product of whole potatoes and with the overall goal of reducing acrylamide levels in potato chips.

The technology worked by sending PEF through the cell walls of the potatoes to perforate cell membranes with microscopic holes.

This allowed sugars and asparagine to be released from the vegetable before it was cooked, thereby reducing the harmful acrylamide.

The process
Peeled and washed potatoes are supplied in measured quantities by upstream equipment and delivered to the E-FLO infeed chute.

The rotating E-FLO wheel transports the potatoes through the processing area as a compact, packed bed through a water bath.

Processing takes place in a water bath so that the electrical pulses can influence the product as desired. After a short exposure to the electric field pulses, to perforate the cell walls, the potatoes are lifted and discharged from the water bath by the continuing rotation of the wheel into the discharge chute. The potato then continues down the production line where greater amounts of sugars and asparagine can be removed during the slicing and washing stages.

In the case of the European snack processor, E-FLO saw excellent results with a reduction of acrylamide in its potato chips. As have other E-FLO installations, with some processors experiencing a reduction of acrylamide (in most cases) by over 50 per cent in their potato chips.

The E-FLO had met the original goal of reducing acrylamide while ensuring no degradation to the original taste and texture of the product. To the delight of the Heat and Control design team, the technology was able to offer other benefits.

Lower processing costs
In addition to reduced acrylamide formation, the use of PEF technology in the E-FLO system was shown to also provide yield savings with faster processing of the potatoes, cutting improvements for a longer blade life and lower oil content in the final product.

Aside from reducing acrylamide and creating a healthier product, other benefits of using electroporation included increased line efficiency and reduced operation cost. In addition to a return on capital investment due to increased yields processors enjoyed the following benefits:
• Reduced acrylamide allowed them to meet EU legislation.
• Reduced preparation time, water and energy usage.
• Less blanching – electroporation allows the tissue of potatoes to become more permeable removing the need for blanching before cooking. With less blanching, starch loss was avoided and yield was increased
• Reduced wear and tear of slicing blades – slicing thousands of potatoes daily results in dull slicer blades. PEF processing softens the tissue of the potato, allowing blades to slice between the cells of the potato rather than through them. This lessens the pressure and friction on tools, which equates to less down time and longer equipment life.
• Reduced oil use – slicing between the cells of the potato also produces a smoother chip surface. A smoother surface means the chip absorbs less oil, which significantly reduces oil expenditure in the long run.
• Health benefits – PEF treatment typically reduces fat content of the final potato by two to three per cent. This is due to increased starch content in the outer cell layers of the potato slices and smoother surface after cutting, which enhances the oil drip-off effect after frying.

This creates a more desirable, crunchier and premium product.

Today, the European snack processor continues to use the E-FLO to produce its potato chips with less acrylamide and meet EU regulations. The E-FLO Electroporation system is an example of innovative technology made in Australia with the help of global partners.
The right partner

Reduction of acrylamide is an important issue and one that industry is beginning to embrace on a global scale, regardless of regulation.

Potato processing is a significant investment and the key to success is choosing a supplier who can work with a company to meet their objectives.

The right partner can create a line that meets performance, quality, and efficiency targets from the outset.

Importantly, the total cost of ownership, rather than the individual cost of single pieces of equipment, should be considered.

Heat and Control celebrates 70th anniversary

Founded in 1950, Heat and Control, an equipment manufacturer and food processing industry supplier, celebrates its 70th anniversary on June 27, 2020. Heat and Control will celebrate this platinum occasion with a 12-month long celebration.

With seven decades of modernising equipment solutions, the company continues to advance the food, pharmaceutical and multiple additional industries. Heat and Control takes pride in the machinery they manufacture and the customers they serve. Strategic partnerships have offered customers ultimate choice, efficiency and performance and provided a resource that can be relied upon for many years.

With the father/son duo working side by side for decades, the family company continues to press forward exploring opportunities to uplift employees, satisfy customers, and build meaningful partnerships.

“Our employees, customers and partners are the heartbeat of Heat and Control,” said Andy Caridis, founder and chairman of Heat and Control, “I invested my entire adult life into this company with a hope and a dream. We started with few but now we are many. For that, I am grateful.”

“Heat and Control’s past with my father paving the way, prepared an outlook for an exciting future,” says Tony Caridis, president of Heat and Control, “We have incredible people in our organisation, customers believe in our abilities, and there is respectful collaboration with our global partners. As the President, I would like to say thank you. Here’s to celebrating the next chapter of innovation together.”

Heat and Control started in industrial process heating applications, such as, heat treatment furnaces and combustion systems, and quickly became food focused as the industry experienced growth in the 1960s. By the 1970s, it was able to supply complete food processing systems that offered a level of modernisation and automation never experienced. Through the 1980s, Heat and Control partnered with Ishida Japan, a company specialising in weighing and packaging technologies and acquired several factories to help serve their growing customer demand.

The 1990s introduced huge product line expansions and additional offices to serve the food market. New technology was introduced with FastBack, bringing horizontal motion conveying to the food processing industry providing better product handling between processing and packaging equipment, and later revolutionising the snack industry with the development of the now popular On-Machine Seasoning method of in-packaging room seasoning application.

Add that with the acquisition of Mastermatic, a frying technology company with a significant history and portfolio in coating, frying, and auxiliary systems, Heat and Control continued to strengthen its offering to the food industry.

In the 2000s, Heat and Control opened several factories and offices around the globe, increased focus on development of improved controls and information systems and partnered with CEIA, a metal detection manufacturer. Spray Dynamics, who had a long food industry history joined the Heat and Control brand family in 2011 and increased seasoning and coating capability and industry access to expertise in in-kitchen seasoning innovation.

Each of these strategic growth experiences and partnerships over the years has worked to continually build an end-to-end line solution provider that helps food companies take better control of their production and make better quality products.

With almost 1,600 employees worldwide in more than 30 offices, Heat and Control brings science, imagination, and unmatched commitment to every project. Striving to do more they help customers bring their products to market.

Rotary Dryer Roaster for nuts and meat snacks

The latest innovation in roasting technology from Heat and Control, the Rotary Dryer Roaster (RDR), will provide snack and prepared food operators with an end-to-end solution for the dry roasting of nut, seed and dry meat products like beef jerky.

The RDR multizone convection dryer/roaster system uses the technological advances in dry roasting so food processors can continuously process high volumes of foods.

“This latest addition to Heat and Control’s catalogue reinforces our strength in thermal food processing technology and provides snack and meat manufacturers with even more options, as well as confidence, that they can consistently produce high-quality product,” said Jim Strang, CEO for Heat and Control International.

“We have been offering the latest technology and the highest quality equipment since 1950, and the Rotary Dryer Roaster is the latest example of our continued commitment to develop solutions that empower our customers,” said Strang.

RDR for nuts
The RDR advances Heat and Control’s snack line capability, enabling food manufacturers to take advantage of the cost saving benefits a single source supplier can offer with a solution for seasoned and coated nut snacks, including frying, dryer/roasting, seasoning, coating, conveying, weighing, packaging, case packing, inspection, and controls.

The RDR gives operators control to dry or to roast in a continuous, gentle, and sanitary manner with optimal quality and uniform results.

“The RDR provides high volume convective airflow combined with gentle rotary motion that ensures that all product is uniformly treated with heated air. Operators have full control over the roasting or drying process variables, enhancing the finished products’ colour, flavour, and texture,” said Greg Pyne, Heat and Control sales manager, Australia.

“While this is new equipment for the industry, processors see the potential,” explained Pyne. “They recognise the benefits of the continuous process, the consistency and repeatability of the process, and the savings resulting from reduced labour and floor space requirements.”

Unlike static rack ovens, as product is gently tumbled in the RDR, heated air circulates through the product bed to facilitate uniform drying/moisture removal or roasting. The design handles the raw product in a continuous, high-density manner through a unique flighted drum that ensures positive motion.

Features include a drum design that facilitates continuous first-in-first-out product flow and independent fans and burners in multiple convection zones, which provide complete process control that can be tailored to various products. An externally mounted drum drive design provides access for internal clean-in-place piping and nozzles which provides for automated thorough cleaning.

RDR for meat products
Along with nut products, the RDR is also suitable for applications such as the drying of meats and poultry to create jerky and meat chips, as well as drying pet products to create food and treats.

While Australia has yet to see the same levels of growth as other markets for natural/protein based snacks, consumers are looking for different food options, with demand for jerky on the rise. According to intelligence agency Mintel, the UK and US have achieved 50 per cent growth in the jerky market from 2011 through to 2016. Australia is poised to follow suite for similar growth, with a wave of niche, start-up operators entering the market. Australia is also home to the fourth largest paleo-market in the world.

Jerky snacks are rich in protein, and are becoming more readily available in retail outlets and online as a substitute for cooked meats. Different product flavours, such as chili and lime, teriyaki or smoky chorizo, are also attracting consumers into seeking jerky as a protein rich option when its snack time.

Globally, the meat snack market was worth $6.4 billion in 2017, and is estimated to exceed $29.5 billion by 2025, according to PR Newswire. The growing middle class across Asia are seeking more premium meat-based snacks that are sold in accessible locations for time-poor customers. As the Australian beef market has a reputation in Asia for being a high-quality product, there is demand for the export of Australian beef jerky products, providing manufacturers the opportunity to grow their business internationally.

One of the biggest issues in jerky production is lack of efficiency in the drying process, due to the amount of time it can take to dry the product with consistent taste and quality. Food processors can expand their portfolio to capitalise on new opportunities because the RDR gives operators control to dry or to roast product in a continuous, gentle, and sanitary manner with optimal quality and uniform results.

Heat and Control appoints new sales executive for NSW packaging

With packaging technologies evolving for an everchanging world, new Heat and Control NSW sales executive Rhoardi Borbajo wants to be at the forefront for adaptive and fast-paced packaging equipment solutions.

With a background in pneumatics, Mr Borbajo has worked with major clients in dairy, beverage and pet food applications. In his new role with Heat and Control, Mr Borbajo said his focus is to ensure packaging is smart and sustainable for food and beverage manufacturers while guaranteeing safety and freshness.

“In NSW, we can see growth in the number of small to medium sized businesses looking to take the next step in automation, or looking to retail packaging where they will now need to implement quality control inspection systems,” Borbajo said.

“This can be with checkweighers, metal detectors and X-ray and includes automating production lines. The advantage of Heat and Control is that we can offer nearly everything, including project management.

“It means we can take the worry out of trying to coordinate and integrate several different suppliers.”

Heat and Control have manufactured food processing and packaging equipment for over sixty-five years.  Supplying systems for snackfood, French fries, vegetables, meat, poultry, industrial and commercial products, product handling and packaging systems, Heat and Control’s ‘total systems approach’ offers customised solutions to reach each customer’s distinctive goals.

Inspection system protects brand

Protecting your brand in the marketplace and providing customers with high quality products are some of the most important functions a food manufacturer can perform. Meeting consumer expectations for food safety and consistency can be a defining factor in a brand’s success but all the time and money spent establishing a reputation can be
lost in the event of one safety recall.

That is why developing and maintaining an effective, verifiable inspection program is no longer just an option for processors, but a necessity. The increase in innovative technology now provides a range of systems that can not only detect foreign objects, but can also operate simply, efficiently, and at high speed while collecting data to provide a transparency previously unachievable.

Metal Detection
Metal detection is an inspection process that can occur at several points throughout a production line. The primary purpose of installing metal detection is to identify ferrous (magnetic), non-ferrous metal contaminants in a product – for example aluminium, stainless steel and even paint chips.

While the use of metal detection in food production is primarily for the quality control of a product and ultimately consumer protection, metal detection units can also be used to protect machinery throughout the production line. The smallest metal particles can lead to machinery malfunction, resulting in revenue decreases due to the need for production downtime to perform repairs, as well as the cost of the repairs themselves.

Metal detectors perform differently depending on their application. When used in food processing, metal detectors are typically constructed as a metal box housing a three transmitter-receiver coil detector system. The transmitter coil generates an electromagnetic field, similar to how a radio transmitter would function.

If a metallic object is present it interferes with the electromagnetic field, causing a signal to be detected by the receiver coils. Although metal particles are able to be detected by other forms of inspection systems, metal detection systems are separated by their level of sensitivity.

Cutting-edge technology in metal detection has seen the invention of a multi-spectrum system. This new generation of metal detector is capable of eliminating false rejects without reducing sensitivity. Using proprietary multi-spectrum technology, it is able to consistently detect smaller metal particles in difficult products like wet spinach, cheese, tortillas and ground beef.

A manufacturer of metal detectors, CEIA, has developed multi-spectrum technology available in no other metal detector. The CEIA’s MS21 multi-spectrum metal detectors are the only metal detectors that use many frequencies simultaneously.

More detection frequencies mean more sensitive metal detection and fewer product effect errors. Other metal detectors – even three-frequency models – use only one frequency at a time.

Seal Checking
Seal checking or testing is used to detect leakage, as well as identify trends that may give early warning of deterioration in the sealing process. As a product moves through the seal checker/tester, an inspection head applies optimum controlled pressure to the pack to detect and evaluate any subsequent “give”.

Ishida high-performance, in-line seal checkers can inspect up to 150 bags per minute, making seal checking an integral step of the inspection process for the reduction of waste, as well as ensuring product integrity prior to it reaching retailers.

X-ray Inspection Systems
Used in conjunction with metal detection, an X-ray inspection system is the final check in a complete inspection line. X-ray inspection is a way of identifying inconsistencies, physical defects, and/or contaminants in product packaged in a pouch, bottle, can, jar, or flow of product passing through the system, without damaging the food product. Contaminants can be foreign bodies in the product such as pieces of glass, stone, shell, pebbles, bone, as well as plastics including hard rubber, nylon, PVC, and Teflon, and metals such as steel, iron, and aluminium.

X-rays are a form of electromagnetic wave of high energy and short wavelengths that are able to pass through food products. X-ray inspection systems function by passing an X-ray beam through an item as it moves along the line. As the X-ray beam passes through the item, it is converted into a greyscale image that can be easily scrutinised and recorded for historical traceability records. Contaminants denser than the product will present in this image as darker, whereas voids or missing pieces will present as lighter. This forms the basis of identification.

The Ishida range of X-ray inspection systems to help food manufacturers and processors comply with global safety standards and meet the demands of quality and safety-conscious retailers.

The IX-G2 series is able to provide a high level of quality assurance to processors and manufacturers of complex products including poultry, meat, vegetables, French fries and cereals. Its dual energy sensor provides effective X-ray detection of low-density objects.

Optical Sorting
Sorting systems are also an integral part of the food processing line. A wide range of systems are available to food processers including colour sorters, smart laser sorters and also new hyperspectral technology.

Laser sorters inspect structural properties of each object to identify and remove foreign matter to improve the quality and increase the value of the product. These quality objectives are easily achieved with today’s sophisticated range of digital sorting systems that recognise colour, shape, size, and structural properties.

Laser and laser/camera sorters are available as combination systems. Designed with up to five lasers operating at different wavelengths, they can detect and remove a variety of defects and foreign matter. When combined with high-resolution cameras for superior shape, size, and colour determination, the result is a high-quality product.

They are configurable with a range of sensor options for single- or double-side viewing of the product stream on low to medium-capacity applications.

It sorts and manages separation of the product stream into two or three sort ways. The VeryX digital sorting platform has a modular platform of chute-fed and belt-fed sorters to meet specific needs. It features innovative mechanical architecture and sensor technology, state-of-the-art electronic sort engine advances machine algorithms and rich information capabilities.

Inspection system protects brand

Protecting your brand in the marketplace and providing customers with high quality products are some of the most important functions a food manufacturer can perform. Meeting consumer expectations for food safety and consistency can be a defining factor in a brand’s success but all the time and money spent establishing a reputation can be lost in the event of one safety recall.

That is why developing and maintaining an effective, verifiable inspection program is no longer just an option for processors,  but a necessity. The increase in innovative technology now provides a range of systems that can not only detect foreign objects, but can also operate simply, efficiently, and at high speed while collecting data to provide a transparency previously unachievable.

Metal Detection
Metal detection is an inspection process that can occur at several points throughout a production line. The primary purpose of installing metal detection is to identify ferrous (magnetic), non-ferrous metal contaminants in a product – for example aluminium, stainless steel and even paint chips.

While the use of metal detection in food production is primarily for the quality control of a product and ultimately consumer protection, metal detection units can also be used to protect machinery throughout the production line. The smallest metal particles can lead to machinery malfunction, resulting in revenue decreases due to the need for production downtime to perform repairs, as well as the cost of the repairs themselves.

Metal detectors perform differently depending on their application. When used in food processing, metal detectors are typically constructed as a metal box housing a three transmitter-receiver coil detector system. The transmitter coil generates an electromagnetic field, similar to how a radio transmitter would function.

If a metallic object is present it interferes with the electromagnetic field, causing a signal to be detected by the receiver coils. Although metal particles are able to be detected by other forms of inspection systems, metal detection systems are separated by their level of sensitivity.

Cutting-edge technology in metal detection has seen the invention of a multi-spectrum system. This new generation of metal detector is capable of eliminating false rejects without reducing sensitivity. Using proprietary multi-spectrum technology, it is able to consistently detect smaller metal particles in difficult products like wet spinach, cheese, tortillas and ground beef.

A manufacturer of metal detectors, CEIA, has developed multi-spectrum technology available in no other metal detector. The CEIA’s MS21 multi-spectrum metal detectors are the only metal detectors that use many frequencies simultaneously.

More detection frequencies mean more sensitive metal detection and fewer product effect errors. Other metal detectors – even three-frequency models – use only one frequency at a time.

Seal Checking
Seal checking or testing is used to detect leakage, as well as identify trends that may give early warning of deterioration in the sealing process. As a product moves through the seal checker/tester, an inspection head applies optimum controlled pressure to the pack to detect and evaluate any subsequent “give”.

Ishida high-performance, in-line seal checkers can inspect up to 150 bags per minute, making seal checking an integral step of the inspection process for the reduction of waste, as well as ensuring product integrity prior to it reaching retailers.

X-ray Inspection Systems
Used in conjunction with metal detection, an X-ray inspection system is the final check in a complete inspection line. X-ray inspection is a way of identifying inconsistencies, physical defects, and/or contaminants in product packaged in a pouch, bottle, can, jar, or flow of product passing through the system, without damaging the food product. Contaminants can be foreign bodies in the product such as pieces of glass, stone, shell, pebbles, bone, as well as plastics including hard rubber, nylon, PVC, and Teflon, and metals such as steel, iron, and aluminium.

X-rays are a form of electromagnetic wave of high energy and short wavelengths that are able to pass through food products. X-ray inspection systems function by passing an X-ray beam through an item as it moves along the line. As the X-ray beam passes through the item, it is converted into a greyscale image that can be easily scrutinised and recorded for historical traceability records. Contaminants denser than the product will present in this image as darker, whereas voids or missing pieces will present as lighter. This forms the basis of identification.

The Ishida range of X-ray inspection systems to help food manufacturers and processors comply with global safety standards and meet the demands of quality and safety-conscious retailers.

The IX-G2 series is able to provide a high level of quality assurance to processors and manufacturers of complex products including poultry, meat, vegetables, French fries and cereals.

Its dual energy sensor provides effective X-ray detection of low-density objects.

Optical Sorting
Sorting systems are also an integral part of the food processing line. A wide range of systems are available to food processers including colour sorters, smart laser sorters and also new hyperspectral technology.

Laser sorters inspect structural properties of each object to identify and remove foreign matter to improve the quality and increase the value of the product. These quality objectives are easily achieved with today’s sophisticated range of digital sorting systems that recognise colour, shape, size, and structural properties.

Laser and laser/camera sorters are available as combination systems. Designed with up to five lasers operating at different wavelengths, they can detect and remove a variety of defects and foreign matter. When combined with high-resolution cameras for superior shape, size, and colour determination, the result is a high-quality product.

They are configurable with a range of sensor options for single- or double-side viewing of the product stream on low to medium-capacity applications.

It sorts and manages separation of the product stream into two or three sort ways. The VeryX digital sorting platform has a modular platform of chute-fed and belt-fed sorters to meet specific needs. It features innovative mechanical architecture and sensor technology, state-of-the-art electronic sort engine advances machine algorithms and rich information capabilities.

Heat and Control, and Ishida, open their doors to industry people

With a combined 200 years of experience in the snacks industry, Heat and Control, and Ishida open their doors to industry people.

The companies demonstrated their complete solutions in a snacks food production Open House event at the Ishida factory facility in Birmingham, UK.

About 100 snack food producers visited the demonstration centre during a three-week period in June, 2018.

The event provided snack food producers the opportunity to see the equipment in action and to participate in a series of information and training sessions.

READ: Ishida and Heat and Control announce enhanced co-operation

Packaging & Inspection Systems business manager Robert Marguccio, said the event was a great way for customers to interact with snack food experts from both Heat and Control and Ishida.

“Given the automation benefits of Industry 4.0, engaging with a single source supplier like [Heat and Control] Snack Solutions can add value through increased connectivity levels and digital data exchange, along all stages of the processing and packaging production lines,” said Marguccio.

Working with one supplier was a far easier and cost effective process, as customers only needed to speak to one team, he said.

Snack food producers were able to see demonstrations of product moving through key sections of the processing and packaging lines.

One example was potato chips moving from a switchback conveyor into an incline conveyor, which can move product vertically to where it’s needed, while reducing drop damage.

After reaching the top of the incline conveyor, the potato chips are transported down the line through Heat and Control’s fastback revolution proportional gate.

The gate eliminates product breakage during gate closure and provides an accurate feed of product to weigher via the fastback Left Right Center (LRC).

The LRC is a double multihead weigher feed solution designed to provide a precise and consistent product stream to Ishida’s patented back-to-back 218 twin weigher.

The product then moves from the weighers into twin or single snack food bagmakers.

For quality control, Ishida checkweighers will verify correct product weight or count, eliminate underweights, and protect profits by eliminating costly product overweight giveaway.

The snack product is then packed using the ACP-700 case packer, which can be integrated into any snacks production line.

Automation of the line is controlled using Heat and Control, and Ishida’s data solutions technology, which enables operators to fully oversee the production line and provide real time feedback to the operator.

The companies came together to form a strategic alliance that provides snack customers with full end-to-end processing and packaging solutions.

In Australia, New Zealand and the USA, Heat and Control is the exclusive distributor of Ishida packaging and inspection technology.

In India, Heat and Control is the exclusive distributor for snack food packaging.