Australia’s drinking quantity decreases but quality increases

Australians say they are drinking less but better with our per capita spend on alcohol rising as we seek out more premium alcoholic beverages, according to a new report released today.

The emma (Enhanced Media Metrics Australia) Alcoholic Beverages Trends & Insights Report* found that half of people aged 18 years and over say they are drinking less now than they used to.

There is also a move to premium beverages, with the dollar value of liquor sales rising 1.5%^ in 2015, which means Australians are spending more on their favourite drink. Australia is an overwhelmingly wine and beer drinking nation. Wine is our most popular drink, although men up to age 65 prefer beer, the emma data has found.

Cider is our third most popular drink, followed by scotch or whiskey, with other varieties well behind. Women opt for wine more than twice as often as other drinks, whereas men are more varied in their consumption patterns.

White wine edges out red as the most consumed at 43% of adults, compared to 41%, while 23% enjoy sparkling wine or champagne.

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Alcohol is still very much part of Australian culture, with three quarters of adult men and women consuming an alcoholic beverage in the past four weeks.

“The trend towards drinking better offers growth opportunities to premium brands that can tap into the mindset of these consumers.

The move by Australians towards more premium beverages and spending more as a result, underscores the importance of effective brand positioning and marketing.”

Perceptions of quality and value change as people age and emma data shows that older people are more likely to believe that Australian wine is better than that from overseas.

They were also less likely to try foreign beers, preferring homegrown brands. There has been a shift in places and occasions where Australians prefer to drink, which changes by age and life stage. The majority of Australians prefer to drink at home, which was most prevalent among 30-32 years olds at 87%.

Venues where alcohol is consumed differ among various age groups. For example, among 24-26 year olds, 61% drank at a friend or relative’s house, while 19% of 18-20 year olds drank at a nightclub.

Among older people, 50% of 45-47 year olds drank at a restaurant or café, while 36% of 54-56 year olds drank at a bar or pub and a third of 66-68 year olds preferred RSLs, bowls or an AFL club.

According to Ipsos’s consumer segmentation, there are four key segments that represent 35% of Australia’s adult population who are the most likely to drink any alcohol more than once a week.

They are the ‘Educated Ambition’ (highest earners and most educated), ‘Social Creatives’ (young, affluent urbanites), ‘Serene Seclusion’ (people at or near retirement living in regional and rural areas) and ‘Conscientious Consumption’ (middle and upper class families) segments. *

The report draws on data from emma (Enhanced Media Metrics Australia) to explore the changing mindsets, preferences and behaviours of Australian adults towards alcohol. emma interviews more than 54,000 people each year. ^ IBISWorld Liquor Retailing in Australia, March 2016

Asian food security a ‘threat to Australian industry’ says former minister

Industry experts warn the Australian food industry is missing out on potential commercial gains by failing to tap into our world-leading research facilities.

Not protecting our food and agribusiness sector from significant weather events could also place Australia’s export market into Asia in jeopardy.

Former Federal Minister for Industry and Science, The Hon. Ian Macfarlane, who officially opened the 49th Annual Australian Institute of Food Science and Technology Convention, reinforced the importance of innovation in agribusiness and highlights Australia’s poor record of converting research and development (R&D) investment into commercial outcomes.

“The Australian food and agribusiness industry spends $541 million a year on R&D and, while ranked the 17th most innovative nation in the world, is listed very poorly at 116 out of 142 countries when it comes to converting those research dollars into innovation and commercial success,” said Mr Macfarlane.

According to Mr Macfarlane, the industry has a responsibility to commercialise innovation, grow the economy and provide long-term, well-paid jobs in Australia. Australian agribusiness currently includes 27,400 businesses and accounts for more than $55 billion of Australia’s international trade, making it the fastest growing sector in Australia. Our farmers export two-thirds of their produce and farm exports have grown by approximately 40 per cent in the last five years.

Convention keynote speaker Phil Ruthven, futurist and founder of market research company IBISWorld, noted that long-term exports are in danger and may require a major rethink of how and where we produce food.

“Supplying food to 1.5 billion people in China and 1.3 billion people in India is a real challenge for Australia and one of the macro challenges we face over the next several decades,” said Mr Ruthven.

“It also brings a great challenge as to how we can have more reliable food supplies generated in Australia. Our country is infamous for its droughts, floods and lack of water. Rethinking agriculture and the way we value-add to our manufacturing – even relocating agriculture and manufacturing areas further north where there is more water – is something to be considered,” he says.

Experts at the AIFST Convention will also consider challenges such as catering for Australia’s increasing ageing and allergy-affected population by improving the allergenic profile and microstructure of foods, and the wide spectrum of industry-leading innovations that are contributing to Australia’s ‘ideas boom’.

Hosted at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, the 49th AIFST Convention is co-located with the FoodTech QLD Exhibition – the major trade event for Queensland food manufacturers.

As Australia’s largest food industry gathering for 2016, the overarching theme of the 49th AIFST Convention is ‘The Pulse of the Industry’, which demonstrates the current innovation and advanced technology employed by the industry.

Cadbury sends off Australian Paralympic Team to Rio

Cadbury has presented the Australian Paralympic Team with thousands of personal messages of support from fans across the nation as part of their campaign to Bring on the Joy in the lead-up to the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games.

The activity forms part of Cadbury’s mission to rally Australians together and support the 2016 Australian Paralympic Team as the athletes prepare to compete in Rio. As an Official Partner of the 2016 Australian Paralympic Team, Cadbury has pledged its support with an AUD $1 million contribution towards the development of para-sport in Australia.

The brand has continued its support by championing the Team as part of its consumer marketing campaign which kicked off earlier this year, encouraging fans to show their support for the athletes through a dedicated digital activation.

Australians responded in their droves with over 5,000 messages shared, aimed at inspiring the para-athletes as they prepare to compete on the world’s biggest stage. At an event held in Sydney this week, many of the Australian Paralympic Team came together as part of a celebration of the campaign and Cadbury’s contribution to the Team’s efforts.

Athletes were showered with messages in many different ways as a demonstration of the support received from the public. All messages that were shared have been printed in a specially-designed book for the athletes to keep as a reminder of the nation’s unwavering support for the team.

Lauren Fildes, Head of Strategic Partnerships and Events at Cadbury, said: “We’re delighted to have the opportunity to be partners of the team and we will be right behind them in Rio!”

Lynne Anderson, Chief Executive Officer at the Australian Paralympic Committee, said that they were “…grateful to have such a supportive partner who has helped create an unbelievable buzz around our Team as the Paralympic Games approach. To know the Australian public is right behind us provides all of our athletes with a huge boost.”

The Australian Paralympic Committee will be sending an Australian team of more than 170 para-athletes from every Australian State and Territory to compete in up to 15 sports at the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games.

Report highlights new directions for packaging

‘New directions’ in packaging and labelling technology are a strong feature of today’s market – and the latest is digital direct-to-container print. It may, indeed, be a disruptive technology, as the new Direct Digital Printing Technology for Labeling & Product Decoration AWAreness Report 2016 demonstrates.

This latest addition to AWA Alexander Watson Associates’ portfolio of assessments of aspects of global label printing market provides a valuable resource for all interested in, or already committed to, this 21st-century product identification technology.

Eliminating entirely the need for a label on rigid or semi-rigid containers, direct digital print offers brand owners a new palette of opportunities — including economies of scale, shorter route to market, and enhanced levels of brand presentation and promotion, such as personalization.

However, this is a technology in its infancy, and further technical and commercial innovation and a broader supplier source at all levels can be expected.

The report posits that the total potential volume growth of the global label market could be negatively affected, losing market share to direct container print.

Pressure-sensitive and wet glue labels are the leading candidates for replacement, but sleeving and in-mould labels will not be immune.

Substitution of labels in all technologies will, says the report, represent the equivalent of 0.5%-1.0% of the global label market by 2019/2020.

Complete with an industry-wide survey of the technology’s present status and future opportunities, and a directory of equipment, inks, and ancillary manufacturers, Direct Digital Printing Technology for Labeling & Product Decoration AWAreness Report 2016 represents an expert overview of a key packaging market development.

The report may be ordered online via the AWA Alexander Watson Associates website, www.awa-bv.com, along with details of the company’s full range of market research and consultancy services and events.

Hygienic stainless steel air nozzles for food makers

A challenge for many manufacturers is finding flat air blowing nozzles that are durable and appropriate for their application.

Traditionally made of Polyacetalic resin (POM) or nickel-plated aluminium, they are unable to withstand the rigours of caustic cleaning chemicals so need to be replaced regularly.

To solve this problem, Tecpro Australia has just released a Flat Fan Blowing Nozzle in 316L Stainless Steel – ideal for applications requiring strong impact airflows.

Designed and manufactured in Europe, these Flat Fan Blowing Nozzles provide constant, streamlined airflows without turbulence. In fact their superior design induces surrounding air to magnify the air blowing force to create greater efficiency.

When mounted side-by-side, they provide a highly effective air curtain for conveyor belts.

The 316L Stainless Steel Flat Fan Air Nozzle is resistant to corrosive forces in situations where caustic chemical cleaning is required and is suitable for use in hygienic applications. As a result, they are well suited for food, beverage and pharmaceutical manufacturing.

The nickel-plated aluminium model and the POM option are cost effective alternatives suitable for removing moisture, dust, swarf and other waste resulting from machining and woodworking processes or prior to laminating surfaces.

All models of Tecpro’s Flat Fan Blowing Nozzles use compressed air which is blown through 16 orifices to produce a uniform spray of strong impact air jets with low noise. In addition, these Air Blowing Nozzles comply with OSHA Regulations.

Why we regain weight after drastic dieting

A few years ago I proudly lost almost 15% of my weight. However last week I stared with disbelief at my scale as I realised all my efforts were in vain and I had regained all of the previously lost weight.

This got me thinking about the mechanisms that underpin such dramatic fluctuations in weight (sometimes known as yo-yo dieting) and the defences the body uses for weight maintenance.

Even losing as little as 5% of our body weight has a myriad of health benefits, including reduced risk of heart attacks, lower blood pressure, improved glucose control in patients with diabetes, improved mental health and reduced risk of osteoarthritis and certain cancers.

Thus one would imagine the body would generally be supportive of weight loss. If so, why is persistent weight loss and weight maintenance so difficult?

Why the body fights weight loss

The control of weight is based on the balance between calorie consumption and the energy spent during our day to day living. The brain’s weight control centre is in an area called the hypothalamus.

The hypothalamus integrates the incoming signals from the body (such as hormonal signals) and other parts of the brain and then controls weight by affecting hunger and satiety.

It also communicates with other parts of the brain that control metabolism (such as the pituitary gland and sympathetic nervous systems). This complicated and fine-tuned system determines a “weight set-point” which is the weight the body is accustomed to and then works to defend it by fine tuning our metabolism and our calorie consumption.

Energy consumption is divided into the resting metabolic rate (about 70% of all energy used), the energy consumed in processing the food we eat (thermogenic metabolism) and exercise based energy expenditure.

A few studies have outlined the result of moderate weight loss. The body defends against weight loss by drastically reducing the energy expenditure. The body also goes into a sort of “starvation mode” to protect against lean body weight loss by preferentially depleting different energy stores including glycogen, fat and then eventually muscle.

The body spends a large percentage of energy in the maintenance of organ function, even when asleep. In obese people, the resting metabolic rate significantly increases, perhaps to try to prevent further weight gain. Unfortunately, when you lose weight, the opposite happens and the body’s metabolism turns right down.

This may occur through reductions in the active thyroid hormone (T3) and changes in the hormonal messages back to the brain promoting hunger.

A key finding in the above studies is the reduction in resting metabolic rate is disproportionately large, and potentially persists for long periods. This explains why a return to a pre-weight loss lifestyle inevitably results in weight re-gain, and possibly more than was lost.

Only by maintaining a healthy lifestyle with calorie restriction of around 25% and exercise can we avoid the inevitable. The reduction in resting metabolic rate may be particularly problematic in people with severe obesity.

Drastic long-term weight loss

This led me to examine the published data on contestants with severe obesity in The Biggest Loser. I wondered what had become of the contestants who had lost amazing amounts of weight over a relatively short period of time.

Majority of The Biggest Loser contestants regained a significant proportion of their lost weight.
AAP Image/Channel Ten

One study confirmed that despite the rigorous exercise programs, the drop in resting metabolic rate persisted. In a study published this year that followed 14 of the original 16 contestants, the majority had regained a significant proportion of the weight loss. More importantly, their resting metabolic rate was still low, almost six years after the end of the show. This suggests the metabolic adaptation against rapid weight loss may be profound and sustained, possibly explaining why we potentially regain even more weight than we originally lost.

This same phenomenon was found after weight loss following a type of bariatric surgery, where weight loss is achieved by reducing the size of the stomach with a gastric band. The metabolic adaptation in these patients was very similar to that found with similar weight loss in The Biggest Loser.

The long-term data for bariatric surgery in terms of sustainability of weight loss suggests other factors (most likely related to gut hormones such as ghrelin) must be influencing energy balance as there is evidence that weight loss is maintained even after many years.

How to avoid the slowed metabolism

So is there a way to counter nature’s opposition to weight loss?
Certain types of exercise such as strength exercises preserve muscle mass and this assists in preserving the resting metabolic rate. However it doesn’t always work.

Thus it may be that only sustained modest exercise and a permanent reduction in calories are both essential for weight loss and maintenance. Although there is no data on the rate of weight loss at which metabolic adaptation occurs, most guidelines recommend gradual and steady weight loss of between 0.5-1kg per week, as part of a sustainable lifestyle change which includes appropriate exercise activity and a balanced nutritious diet.

The Conversation

Sergio Diez Alvarez, Director Of Medicine, The Maitland and Kurri Kurri Hospital, University of Newcastle

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Crown launches new rider pallet truck range

The new RT 4000 Series rider pallet truck line, which is available in stand-up or sit-down models with load capacities of up to 2000 kilograms, offers flexible control arrangements and configurable seating on sit-down models to provide comfort for operators of all sizes.

Stand-up models can be configured for right-hand or left-hand steering, meeting the needs and preferences of individual operators.

The Crown RT 4020 stand-up rider pallet truck has a load capacity of up to 2,000 kg. It combines rugged, powerful lift-truck technology with innovative safety features to deliver both responsiveness and reliability.

Thanks to a chassis width of just 780mm, its maneuverability and performance is ideal for fast-paced dock work, even in very confined spaces.

Designed and manufactured by Crown, the AC motor is capable of powerful acceleration at speeds of up to 12.5 km/h.

For ride comfort, the RT 4020 features a suspended floorboard plus a wraparound, soft-foam lean pad, and can be configured with right-hand or left-hand steering as required.

Ingredion and Langdon Ingredients form food ingredients partnership

Food ingredients companies Ingredion ANZ and Langdon Ingredients have announced a strategic partnership for distribution of Ingredion ANZ’s products in Australia.

The partnership is expected to grow sales with access to a wider customer base as well as to drive scale and efficiencies in the partners’ respective supply chains.

The partnership is intended to leveraging each companies’ respective strengths, across the following areas:

– Ingredion ANZ’s broad range of specialty starches, nutrition ingredients and sweeteners, giving Langdon Ingredients expanded texture solutions offerings for their customer base.

– Langdon Ingredients’ large customer base which allows for further growth and expansion of the current Ingredion market.

– Langdon Ingredients’ blending capabilities, which will create combined offerings that offer unique solutions to customers.

Ingredion said in a statement the partnership will reinforce Ingredion’s leadership position in specialty food ingredients in the Australian market and Langdon Ingredients broad portfolio offering to service their customer base.

“We carefully chose the right strategic partnership and believe that the Langdon Ingredients team is well placed to drive further growth of the Ingredion portfolio which complements the current Langdon Ingredients product range,” said Joe Emling, general manager, Ingredion ANZ.

“Langdon Ingredients has a solid history of growth and expansion of ingredients, strong customer relationships and supply chain expertise to support the strategic partnership with Ingredion ANZ,” said Chris Langdon, CEO Langdon Ingredients.

Mövenpick expands range with Blueberry Cheesecake flavour

Swiss ice cream brand Mövenpick has launched a new Blueberry Cheesecake flavour into the foodservice category.

Mövenpick Blueberry Cheesecake is a delicious interpretation of the original dessert with a curd ice cream enriched with an intense blueberry ripple and chunky biscuit pieces.

The new flavour is available in 2 x 2.4L cartons and joins the brand’s 24-strong range of ice creams and sorbets purchasable for wholesalers nationwide from Mövenpick distributor, RoyalCDS.

Created by chefs for chefs, the Mövenpick Maîtres Glaciers have crafted their own ice cream version of an iconic dessert made with naturally sourced ingredients with no artificial additives or colours including delicious seasonal blueberries.

Mövenpick ice cream is made so each scoop is consistent in taste thanks to evenly distributed ripples, sauces and pieces, and its low melting point means it will always stand strong on the plate.

The new flavour is available in 2 x 2.4L cartons and joins the brand’s 24-strong range of ice creams and sorbets purchasable for wholesalers nationwide from Mövenpick distributor, RoyalCDS.

Charlie’s Cookies takes to the skies with Qantas

Qantas’ in-flight snack offering has been elevated to new heights since Charlie’s Cookies launched its Proud to Call Australia Home campaign in late March.

Long known for its grass-roots values and innovative approach to business, Australian made and owned Charlie’s has developed a delicious new line of specially curated in-flight snack boxes with heart.

“Through our on-going relationship with Qantas we discovered a shared vision for wanting to get behind great Australian organisations. Charlie’s set about developing this exclusive program of philanthropic support via Qantas’ complimentary in-flight snack menu, which naturally taps into a huge captive audience. It’s a real win-win all round”, says Ken Mahlab, Managing Director of Charlie’s Cookies.

Each Proud To Call Australia Home snack box includes portions of Delre International Black Jack Aged Cheddar Cheese, Tucker’s Natural Rosemary Lavosh, Beerenberg Caramelised Onion Dip and a 2-pack of Charlie’s very own Gingerbread Hearts, making the perfect mid-flight pick-me-up.

Also launched on March 29th, the new Proud To Call Australia Home snack boxes highlight the work of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisation, Bangarra Dance Theatre.

Long known for its grass-roots values and innovative approach to business, Australian made and owned Charlie’s has developed a delicious new line of specially curated in-flight snack boxes with heart.

Bangarra Dance Theatre Executive Director Philippe Magid says, “We’re thrilled to be partnering with Charlie’s Cookies on their innovative new campaign supporting Australian initiatives and organisations. We’ve been fortunate to have a long and meaningful association with Qantas, so this is great opportunity for us to deepen our relationship and grow brand awareness with their customers via the Charlie’s Cookies snack box.”

Charlie’s Cookies Proud To Call Australia Home snack boxes will be a complimentary offering on selected Qantas domestic flights from 29 March 2016 to 30 September 2016.

Busy weekends offer opportunities for premium breakfast products

As the fast-paced nature of twenty-first century life continues to change breakfast from an enjoyable pastime to a chore, consumers are increasingly seeking out convenience foods in the morning. While an established trend during the week, it is increasingly creeping into weekend habits.

According to a Canadean survey of packaging executives worldwide, 77% expect high or moderate demand for on-the-go grocery products during weekday mornings, while 63% forecast high or moderate demand during weekend mornings. While the high demand during weekday mornings is to be expected, this study shows that the industry is preparing to take advantage of a surprising opportunity: convenience breakfasts for those who are time-poor at weekends.

As a result, Canadean said it expects more innovative pack formats to be developed for breakfast drinks and smoothies, including dual packs separating liquid and solid contents, and heat-retaining packs to keep indulgent breakfasts warm while on the go.

“Brands built around convenience should consider brand extensions targeting weekend needs, while those built around enjoyment and indulgence should consider diversifying their product portfolios to offer new, more convenient products that still provide something special for weekend consumers,”

Safwan Kotwal, Analyst at Canadean, says: “Focusing purely on weekday breakfast convenience means brands risk leaving money on the table. While consumers’ timetables are arguably more flexible during the weekend, busier social lives are creating a new market for convenient, but at the same time indulgent, weekend breakfast products.

“Convenience purely targeted at busy office workers or busy parents on the school run means brands could be excluding themselves from a potentially very profitable weekend market.”

While convenience is an important consideration for many consumers, indulging and enjoying breakfast on the weekend is something they look forward to. Although high demand on weekday mornings will remain the most important occasion for convenience products, Canadean said it believes brands must not discount weekends as an opportunity.

“Brands built around convenience should consider brand extensions targeting weekend needs, while those built around enjoyment and indulgence should consider diversifying their product portfolios to offer new, more convenient products that still provide something special for weekend consumers,” Kotwal concluded.

Dairy alternative consumption to reach $19.5 billion in 2020

Dairy alternative consumption is set to rapidly rise globally as Asian-Pacific consumers increasingly turn to products like rice milk, soy milk and almond milk.

According to a MarketsandMarkets report, global consumption of dairy alternatives projected to grow 15.2 per cent over the next five years.

Dairy alternatives are lactose-free, which resemble a milk-like texture and are used to replace dairy-based products. They are produced through various cereals such as oats, rice, wheat, barley, and nuts.

Globally, the health benefits of dairy alternatives have led to its large-scale adoption in numerous applications.

Changing lifestyles, growing health awareness, increasing cases of lactose allergy, and growing application sectors are some of the factors driving the growth of the dairy alternatives market.

The Asia-Pacific region dominated the dairy alternatives market last year, and is set to nearly triple in size over the next five years.

“The growing health awareness, rising preference for vegan diet, and rising cases of lactose intolerance and milk allergy in this region are also driving the market,” the report said.

In order to improve the nutritional value of products whilst increasing sales, dairy alternative manufacturers are presenting new flavours and fortified products, including those with calcium and vitamin D, to the market.

Some companies may use the term ‘dairy-free’ to describe lactose-free or low-lactose products for those consumers with lactose intolerance. Or they may use it on products that are free of traditional dairy ingredients such as milk and cream but not free of milk derivatives such as caseinates or whey.

However, if the products contain milk protein, they are unsafe for individuals with milk allergy. Unfortunately, those with milk allergies cannot rely on "dairy free" claims and will need to scrutinize the ingredient statement for evidence of milk.

While non-dairy is a term that is frequently used on coffee creamers, it is also used similarly on various other products containing caseinates.

Many in the industry are excited to see a natural evolution of businesses that aim to address weight, lifestyle and diabetes concerns. 

Rosella now back on the table with renewed market share

Two years after nearly dropping to less than two per cent of the sauce market, Australia’s oldest sauce brand is on track to increase market share.

2015 marks the 120th anniversary since two men founded the business in a backyard in Carlton, using glass jars to preserve fruits and vegetables throughout its history.

In its 120th year, executive chairman Dan Presser says that Australian families trust and love the brand to ensure that everything is made with the very best quality and the most wholesome ingredients.

Speaking to Food Magazine, Presser said “Australia in the past 40 years has become a far more multicultural country with food and taste influences brought over and integrated into our diets through each wave of new Australians. This has certainly been a large influencer on our tastes.”

Reflecting on the challenges faced as an Australian and family-owned company, Presser believed that Australian consumers had become more discerning in relation to where they spent their money as the range of choices broadens.

Rosella Tomato Sauce or Tomato Soup is essentially timeless: the ingredients put into the products have stayed the same, but the method in which the product is delivered is always set to change –predominantly through supermarkets, petrol stations and convenience stores.’

Returning the brand to its founding mission of using quality local ingredients was one of the first commitments Presser followed through on when family owned company Sabrands purchased Rosella in 2013.

Sabrands is no newcomer to marketing against bigger brands as it already produced Sunraysia and Devondale juice brands before its latest purchase.

Rosella was founded in the late 1800s, with a mission to only use the best of ingredients. It’s about going back to basics, Presser says.

By addressing the key challenge of competing with large multinational companies that have larger financing capabilities with their parent companies in the US, Rosella will attempt to keep up with the current hyper competitive retail environment. 

Clean Label Concepts to Dominate at Fi Europe 2015

Consumers seeking complex foods with a short and simple ingredient list are being encouraged to visit the 2015 Food ingredients Europe & Natural ingredients event.

Approximately 60 per cent of European consumers look at the ingredient list and claims on the back, suggesting that they are demanding shorter and more recognisable ingredient lists on the foods they buy.

Lu Ann Williams, Director of Innovation at Innova Market Insights, said “This demand for clean labels has now brought the need for clear labelling equally to the fore.”

For a product to be marked as “Free from artificial ingredients”, producers tend to incorporate as many natural ingredients as possible –highlighting the naturalness and origin to the customer.

By reformulating products to explore new avenues of communication, Williams believes that the broader industry will be encouraged to move to clearer and simpler claims and packaging designed for maximum transparency.

Although there are no standard labelling applications in place in the industry, ‘a clean label’ that signifies the removal of ingredients from the formulation can ensure that the product ranges meet quality standards without compromising the brand.

Williams claims that customers will soon have the potential to turn to the company for possibilities to replace cost-intensive ingredients such as fat or proteins with starch from the Clean Label Range.

Colouring food naturally works best says Lycored

Lycored, a global leader in carotenoids, says it has overcome the most common technical problems with natural colours to develop a range of vibrant reds, oranges and yellows that make it easy for food and beverage manufacturers to ditch artificial ingredients for good.

Natural colours from Lycored are certified Kosher and Halal, non-GMO, vegetarian and are heat, light and pH stable. They give an authentic appearance to a wide range of products time after time – but not at the expense of a clean label.

Available in the Lycored natural colourings range are two new offerings:

•    Tomat-O-Red – created using tomato-derived lycopene, it offers a more technically sound red colouring alternative to unstable beetroot and anthocyanins, as well as carmine, which is not vegetarian-friendly. It is designed for use in fruit preparations, dairy products, confectionery, meat, baked goods and beverages. Lycored’s lycopene is highly stable under a wide range of pH, ascorbic acid and high-temperature conditions. 

•    Lyc-O-Beta – sourced from Blakeslea trispora, a beta-carotene-rich, allergen-free natural fungus cultivated by Lycored. Natural beta-carotene extracted from Blakeslea Trispora offers a spectrum of yellow to orange shades for use in bakery, fillings, confectionery, dairy and beverages. 

Both ingredients are available in liquid formats in a range of different formulations designed to deliver varying levels of colour intensity and are approved for use as food colourants in Australia. 

Tomat-O-Red and Lyc-O-Beta also offer other application benefits. In beverages, they are light stable and stable alongside added healthy ingredients such as Vitamin C. They are perfect for dairy products because they are stable in pasteurisation and most UHT processes, and when used in fruit yoghurts they will not bleed into the white mass. In confectionery, meanwhile, they offer a safe, natural and visually appealing colour that will delight children.

Tamara Higgins, Lycored’s Global Category Manager for Coloration, said: “There’s huge pressure on food and beverage manufacturers to use natural colours but this can cause a range of technical problems at the point of production. Our natural colours portfolio has been designed to offer the best of everything ¬– naturalness and superb appearance, but not at the expense of performance and functionality. With our colours, your food and beverage products won’t just look fantastic, but they’ll also be natural, safe and stable – everything today’s retailers and consumers want and expect.”

Raw Fermented Paleo Protein

Product Name: Raw Fermented Paleo Protein

Product Manufacturer: Amazonia

Launch date: May

Ingredients:

Vanilla & Lucuma:

Fermented Paleo Wholefood Protein Blend 24.25g (Sprouted, Fermented Whole Golden Pea Husk*, Whole Sacha Inchi*, Fermented Spirulina*, Fermented Spinach*, Fermented Sweet Potato*, Fermented Pumpkin Seed*, Fermented Sunflower seed*, Fermented Flaxseed*, Fermented Alfalfa Seed*, Fermented Millet*, Fermented Quinoa* & Fermented Chia*, <0.05% Molasses added for the fermentation process>), Natural Vanilla Lucuma Blend 575mg (Natural Vanilla Flavour*, Lucuma*, Stevia*) *Certified Organic

Shelf Life: 90 days after opening

Packaging: Airtight cylinder made from recyclable materials

Brand Website: www.amazonia.com.au

What the company says:

Amazonia Raw fermented paleo protein is a delicious wholefood formula that combines a nourishing sprouted base with fermented seeds and greens to create a comprehensive paleo-friendly protein blend.

 

Patent filed for Acrylamide-reducing baker’s yeast

Renaissance Ingredients’ has filed a provisional application for the patent of its non-GMO acrylamide-reducing (AR) baker’s yeast.

The application protects the company’s work over the last two years in developing baker’s yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) that reduces acrylamide by up to 95 per cent in a variety of food products by degrading the precursor compound asparagine.

Acrylamide is a World Health Organization Group IIA carcinogen that has been shown to be mutagenic and neurotoxic in a variety of laboratory animal studies. In 2002, acrylamide was identified in a range of common foods including bread, toast, potato chips, fries, cereals, and coffee. Acrylamide is not added to foods, but forms naturally from the amino acid asparagine when foods are heated above 120 °C (e.g. baking, roasting, or frying). The European Food Safety Association (EFSA) recently announced its latest risk assessment on the continuing widespread presence of acrylamide in these various foods. This report is one of many issued by food regulatory and health agencies worldwide, including the US FDA, Health Canada, and others.

“Our AR yeast is an important step towards solving the global health concerns posed by dietary acrylamide,” said Renaissance Ingredients President Dr. Matthew Dahabieh. “Our testing, both in-house and with commercial partners, demonstrates that AR yeast reduces acrylamide by up to 95 per cent in a variety of foods.”

AR yeast applications: baked goods, potato products, snack foods, and coffee

Renaissance Ingredients’ AR yeast strains are traditional baker’s yeast with an accelerated natural ability to consume asparagine, thereby reducing acrylamide. AR yeast can replace conventional baker’s yeast with no disruption to the baking process. AR yeast also can be used in foods in which yeast is not normally an ingredient. Renaissance Ingredients has conducted numerous successful studies on the feasibility of using AR yeast in novel ways for foods containing yeast extract, chemically leavened foods, or foods exposed to soaking steps during processing. These foods include potato-based products such as potato chips and French fries, savoury snack foods, cereal products, and coffee.

 

New family of Stevia ingredients announced

PureCircle announced a new line of stevia ingredients at the 2015 Institute of Food Technologists Annual Meeting & Food Expo.

The new family of stevia ingredients has been optimized for specific category applications and performs more similarly to sugar.

The PureCircle Matrix Solutions family includes new stevia ingredient Sigma-T, an ingredient with a clean sweetness profile, reduced astringency and bitterness and a sweet aftertaste that performs parity to sugar at mid-level sugar reductions.

"The ingredients significantly outperform first generation Reb A solutions and come from our deep understanding of steviol glycoside research," said John Martin, PureCircle's Global Director for Technical Development and Innovation. "To see them perform similar to sugar on key attributes in our sensory panels is really an accomplishment."

"Understanding the complexity of the leaf and how it works in specific product applications can take up a lot of development resources and time, but these solutions take the guesswork out of stevia development," Martin said. 

 

Ministers to reconsider legalising hemp for food

Australian and New Zealand government ministers will reconsider legalising hemp for food in the first quarter of 2016.

The Australia and New Zealand Ministerial Forum on Food Regulation (the Forum) met in Hobart to discuss a number of food regulation matters.

Before the ban on low THC hemp food may be reconsidered, there are some “knowledge gaps” which the Forum has requested be addressed first.

The FRSC Working Group is addressing the knowledge gaps identified regarding roadside drug testing, cannabidiol levels, legal and treaty issues and concerns that the marketing of hemp in food may send a confused message to consumers about the acceptability and safety of cannabis.

In February, the Forum decided to maintain the ban on low THC hemp as food because of concerns that police drug testing would be compromised by the legalisation of the product.

The Forum has asked officials to progress this work as quickly as possible and has agreed to consider the report on the project outcomes in the first quarter of 2016.

Health Star Rating update

The ministers discussed the progress of the Health Star Rating roll out. The Forum tasked the Food Regulation Standing Committee (FRSC) to provide advice in relation to the clarity that is required on the HSR Terms of Reference to strengthen the governance. This will include advice regarding the process for consultation with and oversight by jurisdictions.

Nut- and seed-based beverages in the Health Star Rating system

The Forum considered a request to classify nut- and seed-based beverages as Category 1D dairy beverages’ for the purpose of the HSR system.

A majority of Forum members agreed that under the HSR system, nut- and seed-based beverages may be classified as Category 1D products, if they meet the calcium requirements for that category.

The Forum also agreed to seek further consideration by the FRSC, with advice from Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) on how dairy alternative beverages should be categorised within the HSR system, and how they should be treated under the relevant food standard. The Forum is also seeking further advice about reconciling recommendations received from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). This will also include the outcome of the current application that is under consideration by FSANZ.

Vitamin D in breakfast cereal

The Forum has asked FSANZ to review a draft standard to permit the voluntary addition of vitamin D to breakfast cereals, to ensure consistency with the ‘Ministerial Policy Guideline for the Fortification of Food with Vitamins and Minerals’. Permitting the addition of vitamin D to breakfast cereals of poorer nutritional quality (e.g., cereals high in fat, sugar or salt) is not consistent with this Policy Guideline. The Forum also agreed that the Policy Guideline will be clarified in conjunction with the FSANZ review.

Country of Origin Labelling

The Forum noted that there was broad community interest in improving the Country of Origin Labelling framework for Australian food. New Zealand didn’t participate in the discussion, as it plans to continue with its current voluntary Country of Origin Labelling scheme.

 

New whole-protein ingredient launched

Hinoman has launched a vegetable whole-protein ingredient made from the Mankai plant.

The vitamin and mineral-rich Mankai plant is a native of Southeast Asia, and has been used in Thailand, Laos and Vietnam for generations. Hinoman’s hydroponic technology enables it to grow the product faster, and in large quantities, without pesticides, while guaranteeing a high protein content of at least 45 per cent by dry weight.

Due to its small particle size, it can be easily incorporated in its natural form into food or beverage applications. “The Mankai plant boasts the closest protein profile to animal protein,” said Udi Alroy, VP of Marketing and Business Development for Hinoman. “The paradox is that this tiny, single-strain microgreen delivers huge health benefits to a wide range of market targets.”

Protein quality depends on digestibility, amino acid profile and content. A high-quality protein contains all the essential amino acids (those the body must source externally), with a high proportion of the branched chain amino acids (BCAA). Mankai is rich in vitamins A and E, the B vitamins, plus minerals and fatty acids.

“All the protein parameters are high in Mankai,” said Ron Salpeter, CEO for Hinoman. “With its high PDCAAS rate of digestibility—0.89—it is more potent than super vegetables, such as spinach, spirulina and kale. Mankai has a light vegetal flavour.”

The Hinoman team invested eight years in research and development to create the sustainable strain and cultivation method for year-round harvest of the ingredient.