Packaging in an age of visual literacy

Over the years the packaging industry has experienced a distinct shift from consumers who wanted quality in the product and were therefore seeking a pack to protect the product, and not much else; to a world that has raised a generation on immersion in visual literacy.

Gaining information about a product is no longer the challenge; this is now merely at the consumer’s fingertips and this access will only grow as people of my generation begin to appreciate how flat the world is and how connected we ought to be if we do not want to be left behind.

How important then is the visual impact of a pack for a generation that has grown up with visual stimulus from the day it was born? This generation’s consumer has its fingertips permanently connected to a button of sorts and at the end of that finger is powerful, all consuming visual information.

The question, therefore, is what ought we to be doing about the visual information on our packaging to ensure our product is the one that visually stimulates the consumer while also offering sufficient, reliable facts for an impatient information seeker?

The past decade has seen a paradoxical shift from consumers relying on brand security and recognition and a dependence on honest information supplied on the pack to a world tormented by mistrust and suspicion owing to the impact of 9/11 on our psyche. The security for the new consumer now lies perhaps far more in the message delivered by the visuals on the pack. The colours, the dimensions, the contrasts, the branding. We need to be preparing faster than ever for a world that has become visually literate and discerning beyond even its own comprehension.

With this emerging connectivity, however, has come the danger of self indulgence where we feel the world has to know our every thought and movement through Facebook or Twitter or podcasts or simply through instant messaging on our mobile phones. My wife reminds me that in such an age where minimum words have the potential for maximum, global coverage, it is the picture that will need to be saying a thousand words.

The need for more information can now be easily satisfied in this world of ours that has become flatter and more connected. Do you have the skills to sell your product to the visually literate? If not, it is highly recommended that you consider using the services of designers who have the expertise to place your product in the hands of consumers who are increasingly greedy about how quickly they want satisfaction. You may think consulting a designer or brand developer is too expensive. Can you afford the long term cost if your product is overlooked?

Pierre Pienaar MSc FAIP
National President
Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP)
 

Jason Fields awarded AIP Fellowship

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) National Board is pleased to advise that they have awarded Jason Fields, Packaging Development Manager, SunRice, a Fellowship.

The grade of Fellow is the highest recognition to AIP members and is designed to recognise the significant and sustained contribution to the technology, science or application to packaging in the industry.

Pierre Pienaar FAIP, National President of the AIP, announced that Jason Fields is a BSc Applied Science graduate who has worked for the past twenty years in the field of packaging technology.
 

Jason’s first job in the packaging industry was as a Packaging Officer with SC Johnson & Son. Since then he has held packaging development roles with Carter Holt Harvey Plastics, Colgate Palmolive and for the last nine years he has been the Packaging Development Manager for SunRice’s global businesses.
 

When asked what he has seen change in the industry over the years Jason indicated that the biggest change to the packaging industry is the power of the retailers.
 

”They are now prescriptive in relation to what packaging formats must be used, the coefficient of friction of shrink film, bar-coding requirements of shippers and pallets, and the move to shelf ready packaging. The continuing growth of private label is also having a major impact on brand owners,” Mr Fields said.
 

The most significant technology that he has seen revolutionise the packaging industry is Digital pre-press and electronic artwork approval.
 

“The world is a truly global market place now, and with advancements in electronic communication, large artwork files can be transferred from a graphic artist in Australia to a printer in Asia in a matter of hours, with pre-press completed and colour separated and trapped PDF’s returned to the client within 24 hours for final electronic approval. It will be interesting to see how long before conventional static printing methods such as gravure, flexo and litho are replaced by digital printing with its options for individualisation of each image for long run work (millions of impressions),” he said.
 

Jason added that receiving the Fellowship is a great and unexpected honour.
“It is humbling to be recognised by ones packaging peers whom understand what our profession actually does.” Mr Fields said.
 

Pierre Pienaar added that “Jason is a person who always strives to maintain and give of his best in the profession of Packaging Technology,”
 

“He has a sound knowledge of the science of packaging and always has the patience and ability to share that knowledge in a way that those around him who may not be in our field, understand and remember it,” Mr Pienaar said.

“Jason’s application to packaging is beyond repute. He is always helping people the rural areas of central and southern NSW where often expertise in this profession is not always in abundance to further their packaging education,” Mr Pienaar said.
 

“Currently Jason is helping with the development of packaging technology in a third world pacific island country. Here away from home, he is giving theoretical lessons, as well as spending many hours on the packaging lines teaching and showing his skills in packaging technology so that they too can benefit from his knowledge,” he said.

The AIP National Board would like to once again congratulate Jason Fields for his significant contribution to the packaging industry in Australia.
 

Glass Is Life, a global campaign

The glass container manufacturer, Owen-Illinois (O-I), has launched a new global marketing campaign called Glass Is Life.

The glassmaking giant has developed the campaign on the understanding that the natural properties of the material – transparency, hygiene, recyclable – means glass packaging helps build successful food and beverage brands.

Through collaboration with top chiefs, environmentalists and CEOs, O-I draws attention to the widespread appeal of glass as a packaging material. 

“O-I’s extensive research shows a strong demand for glass among consumers, but the marketplace does not adequately reflect this interest. We aim to influence the food and beverage industry’s packaging decisions by showing the power of glass,” said Al Stroucken, Chairman and CEO of O-I. “As the leading maker of the purest and most sustainable packaging, O-I is excited to spearhead a movement that demonstrates the unique attributes of glass packaging and brings brands back into glass.”

The campaign includes six speakers from different walks of life, who discuss their thoughts about using glass:

  • Sanpellegrino S.p.A. Chairman and CEO Stefano Agostini, who says glass  showcases the quality of the S. Pellegrino brand.
  • Monini Olive Oil CEO Zefferino Monini, who chooses glass because it best preserves the flavor of the product.
  • Environmentalist Celine Cousteau, granddaughter of Jacques Cousteau, who prefers glass because it is natural, healthy and sustainable.
  • true fruits Co-Founder Nic Lecloux, who says glass demonstrates the quality and sophistication of his premium product.
  • Bundaberg Brewed Drinks CEO John McLean, who bottles his drinks in glass so it stands out on the shelf. 
  • Agua del Nacimiento CEO Juan Gabriel Gonzalez, who says glass is the only packaging that shows the clarity and purity of Colombia’s best water.

Tasmania makes roads from recycled glass

Posted by Rita Mu

Recycled glass containers are being used to build Tasmanian roads.

The new recycling program, which has already been implemented in Western Australia, involves the use of broken glass from households, which are difficult to recycle using conventional methods. The broken glass is crushed into sand-sized fragments and mixed with asphalt, which is then used to reseal, repair or build roads.

The program is part of a partnership between the Australian Food and Grocery Council’s Packaging Stewardship Forum, the Tasmanian Government, Roadways and the Hazell Bros Group.

The Tasmanian Government is currently using recycled crushed glass as a substitute for sand in an $800,000 repair and resealing road project on the East Derwent Highway.

The state’s Minister for Infrastructure, David O’Byrne, said the program was great example of innovative thinking.

“Sand is becoming more difficult to obtain – especially in Southern Tasmania – and recycled crushed glass is seen as an eco-friendly alternative,” O’Byrne said.

“It’s especially fitting to promote this initiative on the eve of World Environment Day, which is celebrated each year on June 5th.”

According to the General Manager of the Packaging Stewardship Forum, Jenny Pickles, more than 13,000 tonnes of glass is recycled in Tasmania annually.

“It’s a win for everyone – less waste to landfill, less extraction of virgin materials, and glass is no longer shipped at high cost to Melbourne for recycling,” she said.

Image: Clarence Council’s Mayor, Jock Campbell, in Hobart with a sample of the recycled glass. Source: themercury.com.au

O-I launches new Vortex beer bottle

Posted by Rita Mu

Glass packaging maker, O-I, has launched a new beer packaging design that features distinctive grooves inside the bottle’s neck.

Designed and made by a unique internal embossing technology in Melbourne, the new Vortex bottle is an Australian first.

O-I Asia Pacific’s General Manager of Marketing and Sales, Jacqueline Moth, said the new bottle was one of the biggest packaging innovations in the beer market in decades.

"It comes at a time when Australian beer brands face stiff competition and are looking for ways to differentiate their products in a crowded marketplace,” she said.

The concept of internal embossing was first revealed by O-I’s US division last year, with the Miller Brewing Co adopting the idea for its Lite range.

According to O-I, Miller Lite sales have increased by six per cent since the product was launched in a new O-I bottle featuring internal embossing.

In Australia, Western Australian Gage Roads Brewing Co will roll out its Wahoo Premium Ale beer in the new Vortex bottle from next month.

Gage Roads’ Chief Executive Nick Hayler said he expected Wahoo beer sales to double in the first 12-months following the re-launch of the product in the new bottle.

“When you consider consumer purchasing behaviours, it’s easy to appreciate the importance of
capturing their attention and standing-out from the retail noise,” Hayler said.

“Our experience in recent years has taught us that packaging which appeals to the consumer
and grabs both their attention and imagination is vital.

“For Gage Roads, O-I’s Vortex bottle provides the opportunity to represent our product in a
way that reflects the unique and subtle qualities of our batch brewed beer.”

O-I’s new Vortex bottles will be produced at the company’s Penrith plant in Sydney.
 

O-I launches new Vortex beer bottle

Posted by Rita Mu

Glass packaging maker, O-I, has launched a new beer packaging design that features distinctive grooves inside the bottle’s neck.

Designed and made by a unique internal embossing technology in Melbourne, the new Vortex bottle is an Australian first.

O-I Asia Pacific’s General Manager of Marketing and Sales, Jacqueline Moth, said the new bottle was one of the biggest packaging innovations in the beer market in decades.

"It comes at a time when Australian beer brands face stiff competition and are looking for ways to differentiate their products in a crowded marketplace,” she said.

The concept of internal embossing was first revealed by O-I’s US division last year, with the Miller Brewing Co adopting the idea for its Lite range.

According to O-I, Miller Lite sales have increased by six per cent since the product was launched in a new O-I bottle featuring internal embossing.

In Australia, Western Australian Gage Roads Brewing Co will roll out its Wahoo Premium Ale beer in the new Vortex bottle from next month.

Gage Roads’ Chief Executive Nick Hayler said he expected Wahoo beer sales to double in the first 12-months following the re-launch of the product in the new bottle.

“When you consider consumer purchasing behaviours, it’s easy to appreciate the importance of
capturing their attention and standing-out from the retail noise,” Hayler said.

“Our experience in recent years has taught us that packaging which appeals to the consumer
and grabs both their attention and imagination is vital.

“For Gage Roads, O-I’s Vortex bottle provides the opportunity to represent our product in a
way that reflects the unique and subtle qualities of our batch brewed beer.”

O-I’s new Vortex bottles will be produced at the company’s Penrith plant in Sydney.
 

Tetra Pak launches Tetra Evero Aseptic

Tetra Pak has launched the Tetra Evero Aseptic 1 litre, the first aseptic carton bottle for milk.

“Tetra Evero Aseptic is a new carton shape that delivers ease of use, high impact branding and cost effectiveness,” said Charles Brand, Tetra Pak Vice President of Marketing and Product Management. “This is a unique packaging concept that brings benefits to producers, retailers and consumers.”

Tetra Evero Aseptic is initially aimed at the ambient white milk market, including non-oxygen sensitive milk enriched with calcium, proteins, fibres (inulin), vitamins A and D and some minerals. This will soon expand to cover a wide range of beverages, including flavoured milk, cream and oxygen sensitive milk, such as Omega 3, Iron, Zinc, and Vitamin C.

“For our most strategic project, we knew we had to have Tetra Evero Aseptic,” said Pedro Astals, President and CEO of Corporación Alimentaria Peñasanta (CAPSA), Spain’s largest dairy. He explained that CAPSA chose the Tetra Evero Aseptic for its move into the value- added ambient dairy segment.

“This package expresses evolution, a very advanced step in comparison with today’s packages. Tetra Evero Aseptic is the perfect match of a high value-added product with a highly developed package. To me this is doubtlessly a winner,” said Astals.

Another European dairy, Weihenstephan, one of Germany’s largest traditional dairies, plans to introduce the Tetra Evero Aseptic from the end of May 2011 to a select number of retail outlets in its first market test of the package. 

Among the new packaging solution’s key attributes are:
Functionality: An ergonomic cylindrical shape with flat side panels means it’s easier for big and small hands to hold. The shape also provides the ideal angle for better pouring than other bottles, according to independent consumer research conducted in several European markets.

The new carton providing maximum branding impact, with printing possible across the whole surface of the package. There are two distribution solutions for Tetra Evero Aseptic — an open cardboard tray and film-shrink with a handle.

Customer system cost: The Tetra Pak® A6 iLine™ for Tetra Evero Aseptic brings dairy producers a cost effective and efficient packaging solution for ambient white milk in a bottle. In fact, Tetra Pak A6 iLine, with a capacity of 10,000 packs/hour, takes up to 50 per cent less space and requires 30 per cent less investment than other aseptic bottling lines. It also offers 25 per cent lower operating costs and requires half the electricity consumption than other aseptic bottling lines.

Environment: The Tetra Evero Aseptic combines the easy handling and pouring of a bottle with the environmental advantages of a carton. It is recyclable andmade from FSC™-certified renewable paperboard.

Innovative technologies: Innovative technologies combined with market insight and processes have driven the creation of this pioneering packaging system. The Tetra Evero Aseptic and the Tetra Pak A6 iLine are covered by 14 design and application patents, with advances that include an industry-first ‘gas phase’ sterilisation technique and advanced injection moulding technologies to fuse the top, carton sleeve and capped neck into a ready-to-fill package.

Michael Grosse, Tetra Pak Executive Vice President, Development and Engineering said: “Tetra Pak has committed its industry leading engineering resources and market insight to develop Tetra Evero Aseptic and the Tetra Pak A6 iLine. It has led to a unique packaging solution that delivers value to our customers and the consumers that buy their products – with functionality, cost and environmental performance never before seen in a bottle form.”

The Tetra Pak A6 iLine will first be available in Europe and South America.
 

Hershey drop lawsuit against Mars

The confectionery maker The Hershey Co. has dropped the lawsuit against rival company Mars Inc.

Hershey had filed a trademark infringement suit last year following allegation that the packaging for Mars Dove bars too closely resembled the orange, brown and yellow of Hershey’s Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups packaging.

Mars had countered the suit with their own concurrent claim ruling that the Dove packaging had not infringed on Hershey’s trademark.

The two companies have filed joint dismissal stipulations.

 Image: https://img.ibtimes.com

Bosch to take part in the Save Food initiative

The Bosch Group is taking part in the international "Save Food" initiative, which was set up by the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), the food and packaging industry and the Düsseldorf Trade Fair Centre.

At present, over a third of all food is wasted globally as it travels from the field to the plate. In emerging countries like India the amount is over three-quarters. The initiative wants to ensure more diligent handling of available foodstuffs and to look for solutions so that less food is wasted. "Only a joint effort will succeed in combating today’s massive waste of food," said Friedbert Klefenz, president of Bosch Packaging Technology.

One reason why food decays prematurely is frequently the lack of appropriate packaging to protect the products from the weather or from pests. This means that transportation and storage is impossible without causing damage to the products. This illustrates the importance of packaging technology in our everyday lives. "Without packaging technology, there would also be much less variety on our dining tables," Klefenz explained.

Because large amounts of harvested food are lost, particularly in poorer countries, resources like arable land, energy and water are not utilized to their maximum potential and are therefore wasted. For example, the production of one kilogram of corn requires 450 litres of water. The figure for one kilogram of rice is 3,000  liters and one kilogram of beef needs no less than 4,500 litres.
Conserving resources and the environment

With new developments, Bosch Packaging Technology will play its part in reducing the use of energy as well as material in the packaging of food products. This will not just lead to lower food processing costs but will also conserve resources and the environment.

One example is aseptic food packaging. Using this technology means that there is no longer a need to heat goods to high temperatures inside the packaging. In turn, much less packaging material is needed and energy use is reduced by up to 70 percent compared to traditional systems. In addition, this gentle way of processing preserves a significantly higher amount of nutrients. Importantly, food packaged in this way does not require a cold chain, which would normally have to be maintained, at a high energy cost, all the way from the processing plant through transportation to the retail outlet.   This type of packaging is therefore especially appropriate in emerging economies where consumers, who do not have access to a supermarket with cooling shelves, can also be supplied.

A further solution developed by Bosch is ultrasonic sealing technology, which uses less energy for the sealing of packages. Unlike heat sealing, the "cold" ultrasonic sealing method does not require pre-heated sealing jaws. Manufacturers are also free to use thinner, and therefore much cheaper, film material. Moreover, ultrasonic sealing produces narrower sealing joints, thus requiring less packaging material.
 

Image courtesy of www.ontheedgeblog.com

NZ winemakers focusing more on label designs

Posted by Rita Mu

New Zealand wineries are demanding more from the designers and printers of their bottle labels as a means of influencing consumer purchasing decisions at the point-of-sale.

Inhouse Design’s Arch MacDonnell said it was critical for winemakers to invest in their labels to remain competitive in the market.

“In what is becoming a saturated field, it is imperative that wine labels stand out from the crowd,” he said. “I think they have a huge influence on point of sale. I think that increasingly people are influenced by the label when buying wine.”

MacDonnell said that while wine label design in New Zealand had been traditionally “relatively conservative”, designers and printers were now increasingly testing new boundaries.

“I think in recent years, we’ve seen some really innovative work coming out of New Zealand, so I think designers and printers are doing a great job,” he said.

Entries to this year’s Pride In Print Awards have shown that designers are pursuing intricate detail and embellishments such as foil, embossing and die-cuts, according to judge Mark Sullivan.

“In fact, it is world class, and something everyone involved in this sector of the industry should be very proud of,” Sullivan said.

“This year’s entries were very diverse, simple spot colour through to complex multi-colour with embellishments, printed with the whole range of processes, flexo, offset, letterpress etcetera.

“It was a pleasure to see and work with such high-quality entries, although it made the judges’ job extremely challenging. The smallest of faults dictated the end results.”

Awards manager Sue Archibald said that wine label entries had grown significantly since they were given their own section.

“We gave them special recognition a few years ago by making them a separate category and the response has been wonderful,” Archibald said.

“The strong design feel has made this a very innovative and colourful area for the judges to adjudicate, and the competition is now the strongest ever.”

This year’s Pride In Print Awards Evening will be held tomorrow, 20 May, at TSB Bank Arena in Wellington, New Zealand.
 

NZ winemakers focusing more on label designs

Posted by Rita Mu

New Zealand wineries are demanding more from the designers and printers of their bottle labels as a means of influencing consumer purchasing decisions at the point-of-sale.

Inhouse Design’s Arch MacDonnell said it was critical for winemakers to invest in their labels to remain competitive in the market.

“In what is becoming a saturated field, it is imperative that wine labels stand out from the crowd,” he said. “I think they have a huge influence on point of sale. I think that increasingly people are influenced by the label when buying wine.”

MacDonnell said that while wine label design in New Zealand had been traditionally “relatively conservative”, designers and printers were now increasingly testing new boundaries.

“I think in recent years, we’ve seen some really innovative work coming out of New Zealand, so I think designers and printers are doing a great job,” he said.

Entries to this year’s Pride In Print Awards have shown that designers are pursuing intricate detail and embellishments such as foil, embossing and die-cuts, according to judge Mark Sullivan.

“In fact, it is world class, and something everyone involved in this sector of the industry should be very proud of,” Sullivan said.

“This year’s entries were very diverse, simple spot colour through to complex multi-colour with embellishments, printed with the whole range of processes, flexo, offset, letterpress etcetera.

“It was a pleasure to see and work with such high-quality entries, although it made the judges’ job extremely challenging. The smallest of faults dictated the end results.”

Awards manager Sue Archibald said that wine label entries had grown significantly since they were given their own section.

“We gave them special recognition a few years ago by making them a separate category and the response has been wonderful,” Archibald said.

“The strong design feel has made this a very innovative and colourful area for the judges to adjudicate, and the competition is now the strongest ever.”

This year’s Pride In Print Awards Evening will be held tomorrow, 20 May, at TSB Bank Arena in Wellington, New Zealand.
 

European aluminium foil sector set to grow

Posted by Rita Mu

Growth in the European aluminium foil sector is expected this year, with first quarter 2011 reports showing an increase in production by 1.3 per cent to 214,400 tonnes compared with the same quarter last year.

Thicker aluminium foil gauges, used mainly for the manufacture of semi-rigid foil trays and technical applications, increased by six per cent, while thinner gauges used mainly in flexible packaging and household foil fell slightly by 0.7 per cent, according to the European Aluminium Foil Association (EAFA). Exports outside the EAFA region remained stable.

In 2010, the European aluminium foil sector grew an overall 10.6 per cent to 850,300 tonnes.

EAFA’s Executive Director, Stefan Glimm, said he was confident that the sector would remain strong in 2011 due to the successful marketing of aluminium foil as a sustainable and cost-effective packaging option.

"Expectations are positive for the rest of 2011 with a number of events providing the aluminium foil sector with the opportunity to show off its packaging and industrial prowess,” he said.

EAFA is currently showcasing the unique properties of aluminium foil at Interpack 2011, which is currently on show in Germany until 18 May.
 

Image: tootoo.com

Former Amcor exec accused of industrial espionage

A former Sales Vice President of Amcor in California has been accused by the packaging giant of plotting to steal hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of confidential data.

Amcor have begun legal proceedings against Charles McHugh after suspecting the former employee of conspiring, with his father, co-defendant William L McHugh, of unlawfully taking trade secrets valued at above US$300,000.

Thomson Reuters News & Insight reported that Mr. McHugh had begun working at Amcor in California in 1994 as a Sales Representative and, having performed well, was made a member of Amcor’s President Club, an exclusive reward for the company’s top 25 sales staff.

Around 2009, McHugh is said to have begun forming his own company called Value Added Packaging & Printing with his father. Thomson Reuter said that Amcor have claim this was taking place while Mr. McHugh was still working for the company and that he “converted, stole, misused and misappropriated” Amcor property, including confidential and proprietary client and marketing files.

Amcor have accused the Mr. McHugh of attempting to drawing clients away from Amcor and into Value Added.

The court papers have said that Mr. McHugh “led Amcor’s customers to believe that Value Added and another company were simply outside manufacturers that Amcor utilized to fulfil orders. Amcor customers were led to believe that their accounts continued to be serviced as Amcor accounts, even though the products were shipped directly from the manufacturer and the invoices were mailed by the manufacturer.”

Image: www.tobacco-facts.net

Baked beans go large

From June, baked beans will be available in a 1kg resealable pack, allowing consumer to get their fill of baked beans from the fridge in portions that suit them.

The 1kg fridge pack has been designed to reduce wastage – those who only want a mouthful of baked beans can have their mouthful, screw the lid back on and put the pack back in fridge.

Alternatively, mums and dads looking for a quick way to feed the family can do so in one economical pack.

The new SPC Baked Beans 1kg fridge pack features a handy see-through portion control panel, so that you can easily see how many beans are left in the pack. Once opened, the baked beans will keep in the fridge for five days allowing for multiple servings for almost a week.

“Each 1kg pack contains 11 serves of vegetables and offers greater flexibility for modern families who are looking for meal options that are easy, taste great and provide value for money,” says SPC Ardmona’s Mary Stafford.

According to leading Australian dietician, Karen Inge, no matter your age, eating baked beans will help you reach the recommended daily intake of important nutrients needed for the body to function efficiently during the day.

“Baked beans are low in fat, contain energy-giving carbohydrates, protein for the body’s growth and repair, plus are an excellent source of dietary fibre,” she says.

SPC Baked Beans contain no preservatives, artificial colours or flavours.

The SPC Baked Beans 1kg fridge pack is available in Rich Tomato flavour.

RRP $3.19
 

Beer PET bottles to reach 7.7 billion by 2015: Study

Posted by Rita Mu

Global PET beer bottle consumption is forecast to grow at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 5.3 per cent to reach 7.7 billion bottles by 2015, according to a new study by market research group Pira International.

The Future of Beer in PET Packaging study, conducted for beer brewers, packaging manufactures and suppliers, provides quantitative market sizes segmented by barrier technology, bottle size, region and country. The study also provides technology and market forecasts to 2015.

One of the main drivers for the increased use of PET bottles for packaging beer will be market penetration into areas not suitable for glass, according to the study.

While Central and Eastern Europe are currently the dominant markets for PET beer bottles, the study also shows good growth for beer in PET bottles going forward, but at rates lower than the 2003-08 pre-recession era. This is a result of higher taxes on beer in Russia and Ukraine, according to the study.

PET beer bottle consumption in Western Europe, North America and South and Central America, is forecast to grow as well in the next five years until 201, but at a relatively low rate.

In Asia-Pacific, China will lead demand for beer in PET bottles.

"PET is showing increased demand from a number of different categories including juices and nectars, ready-to-drink (RTD) teas, functional drinks, flavoured waters and beer. PET bottles are convenient, practical, lightweight and unbreakable," Head of Editorial at Pira, Adam Page, said.

"However many brand owners remain reticent when it comes to using PET packaging for beer. Despite not taking off on a large scale in many traditional beer-drinking countries, there is still a huge amount of interest in the potential for beer in PET due to the perceived advantages. New technologies are helping challenge some negative perceptions and create opportunities for brewers, brand owners, packaging converters and suppliers."

Image: drinkingandyou.com

Coca-Cola, Pepsi settle packaging trademark lawsuit

Posted by Rita Mu

The Coca-Cola Company and PepsiCo have settled a trademark-infringement lawsuit over packaging designs.

In October, Coca-Cola sued PepsiCo, claiming the packaging of the company’s low-calorie Trop50 fruit juice was too similar to its Simply brand juices.

US District Judge Sim Lake signed an order to dismiss the suit late last week. Terms of the settlement have not been disclosed.

Coca-Cola introduced its Simply juice line in 2001 with Simply Orange. The company launched another two flavours in 2007: Simply Grapefruit and Simply Apple.

PepsiCo launched its Trop50 stevia-sweetened orange juice in 2009, and introduced a redesign in August.
 

Image: ajc.com

Australian food packaging declared safe: FSANZ survey

Chemicals used in Australian food packaging do not pose a health risk to consumers, shows a new survey conducted by Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ).

The results of the survey crush previous fears that chemicals in packaging might migrate into foods, contaminating them.

Last year, major retailers and manufactures, including Heinz Australia, began a voluntary phase out of packaged food products containing bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes and liver-enzyme abnormalities. 

A total of 65 foods and beverages packaged in glass, paper or plastic, were analysed in FSANZ’s latest food survey.

Foods tested ranged from instant coffee and honey, to packaged chicken breast and minced beef.

The concentrations of the following chemicals that might migrate from packaging into food were analysed:

• phthalates,
• perfluorinated compounds,
• epoxidised soybean oil (ESBO),
• semicarbazide,
• acrylonitrile and
• vinyl chloride.

Overall, there were no detections of phthalates, semicarbazide, perfluorinated compounds, acrylonitrile or vinyl chloride in any of the foods analysed.

While there were detections of epoxidised soy bean oil (ESBO) in some samples, according to FSANZ, the levels were below international migration limits, including those set by the European Union.

The FSANZ said dietary exposure to ESBO from the contaminated foods does not pose a health and safety risk to consumers.

The survey builds on the 2010 FSANZ survey of BPA.

Image: dailymail.co.uk

Mineral oil barrier breakthrough

Cardboard packaging made of recycled paper often contains mineral oil residues from printing inks. At temperatures as low as room temperature, these residues can evaporate and come into direct contact with dried foods packaged in the box; including pasta, semolina, rice, and breakfast cereals.

Most of the plastic linings in the bag-in-box systems in use today do not provide sufficient protection.

Research conducted by the Food Safety Authority of the Canton of Zurich during 2010, showed that the evaporated mineral oils consist of about 80% paraffin and naphthene hydrocarbons and 15% to 20% aromatic hydrocarbons.

Animal studies carried out by various organisations over the last years show that paraffin and naphthene hydrocarbons are highly likely to damage the liver, lymph nodes and heart valves, and the Joint FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) / WHO (World Health Organization) Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) has implicated aromatic hydrocarbons in causing cancer.

Working to tackle the issue, BASF offers the packaging industry a variety of barrier solutions that demonstrate a high effectiveness in preventing mineral oil residues from migrating from cardboard food packaging into food.

This has been confirmed through a series of studies conducted by the official Food Safety Authority of the Canton of Zurich on the BASF products Ultramid®, Epotal® A 816, Ecovio® FS Paper and specially developed dispersions.

In 2010, a study by Zurich Food Safety Authority scientists using a dedicated measuring method had detected alarming levels of mineral oil residues from cardboard packaging in food. The same method was used in the testing of BASF products.

Four different solutions are available for coating every type of food packaging, including paper, cardboard and film.

Four barrier solutions for virtually every type of packaging
 
  • “During the tests, cardboard, paper and films were coated with materials from BASF and the results show that the migration of mineral oil residues was considerably decelerated. The time measured were far beyond the sell-by dates of the food products normally packaged in such materials,” said Heiko Diehl, member of BASF’s Packaging Network Team. The company offers the packaging industry raw materials for barrier coatings for almost all types of packaging and conventional production processes.
  • Ultramid® , the BASF polyamide, has been used to date for applications including oxygen-barrier, robust multilayer packaging systems to keep meat and cheese fresh. It is suitable for use as a barrier coating both for cardboard packaging and as an inner packaging component in bag-in-box systems. The water-based dispersion Epotal® A 816  is also suitable for film coating and hence for use as a barrier layer in bag-in-box systems.
  • Specially developed water-based acrylate dispersions are also available for paper and cardboard coatings. A variety of paper and cardboard grades coated with these products on a lab and pilot plant scale have exhibited very good barrier properties against mineral oils. The new dispersions are also effective barriers against native fats and oils and flavorings. Preparations for industrial-scale product testing are ongoing. Developed for compatibility with the cardboard production process, these products are designed to provide easily implementable solutions with established technologies .
  • Ecovio ® FS Paper is a biodegradable plastic suitable for manufacturing coatings both for cardboard and biodegradable film packaging systems. Ecovio FS Paper complies with European standard EN 13432 for compostible packaging, offering an alternative disposal pathway for certified paper and cardboard packaging in addition to recycling.
Newspapers as primary source of mineral oil in recycled paper 

The Swiss scientists identified solvent-based ink components used in offset printing as the main source of mineral oils. A smaller percentage comes from the printing inks used to print on food packaging. Most of the mineral oils are from newsprint, which is one of the main components used to manufacture recycled cardboard packaging. 

BASF already offers the printing industry mineral oil-free water-based binders under the Joncryl®brand name which are suitable for flexo printing on packaging, among other applications. The Joncryl® brand also includes binders for wet flexo newspaper printing, a technology already used to print mineral oil-free national dailies in the UK and Italy.
 

 

Image courtesy of https://www.azom.com

Foodpro 2011 update: Innovative glass packaging from O-I

At Foodpro 2011, the Australian international food processing exhibition, Owens-Illinois (O-I), the world’s largest glass container manufacturer, will showcase the latest innovations in safe, pure and sustainable glass packaging solutions for the food and beverage industries.

With expertise in design and production, O-I specialises in supplying high quality glass packaging for the beer, wine, spirit, non-alcoholic beverage, food and ready-to-drink segments.

A highlight at this year’s Foodpro, O-I plans to showcase its new Australian-made Bueno glass food jar range offering 24 options designed to preserve the flavour and freshness of food including fruit, vegetables, dairy and seafood. The versatile Bueno range is available in three designs, two sizes and is designed to be used on existing production lines.
 

The range features four tamper evident closure systems including a plastic cap, foil lid, pop-top metal cap and screw-top metal cap, all suited to a variety of foods and occasions.

In addition, O-I will feature its recently launched 750mL glass bottle for the milk industry.
The new glass bottle, which is also suitable for other non-alcoholic beverages, has been specially designed to fit standard Australian and New Zealand milk crates ensuring convenient storage and transport.

The only Australian manufactured glass olive oil bottles, the Marasca olive oil range, will also be on display. Available in Classic Green 500mL and 750mL bottles, the Marasca olive oil range features a premium European look and includes an olive oil closure friendly finish.

O-I’s glass packaging is made from all-natural materials including sand, limestone and soda ash combined with recycled glass. Each O-I glass container undergoes a rigorous inspection process to ensure the highest quality.
 

Coca-Cola dismiss shareholder calls for bisphenol A disclosure

Around 26 percent of Coca-Cola’s share holders are calling for the company to announce its intentions surrounding the continued use of bisphenol A (BPA) in its packaging.

Despite this mounting pressure, the Coca-Cola remained silent over the issue during the company’s recent annual general meeting.

Shareholders were told by Muhtar Kent, Coca-Cola CEO and Chairman, that there was insufficient scientific evidence that the BPA used in the epoxy linings of its cans posed any health risk to consumers.

Food Production Daily reported Kent as saying "If we had any sliver of doubt about the safety of our packaging, we would not continue to use (BPA). It’s that simple.”

Though scientific evidence has come into conflict with consumer concerns and as such, shareholders are still calling for action against the continued use of BPA.

A resolution, supported by a number of shareholder heavyweights, has been put forward by shareholder advocacy groups, which has asked for “a report to their investors disclosing how it is responding to public concerns about the safety of BPA in products; outline a plan to develop alternatives to BPA in can linings; and address what the company is doing to maintain leadership and public trust on this issue”.
 

 

Image courtesy of https://i.dailymail.co.uk